Top 33 Slang For Reap – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to the latest slang, staying in the loop can be a real challenge. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered with a curated list of the top slang for “reap” that will have you speaking like a pro in no time. So, get ready to up your slang game and impress your friends with these trendy expressions!

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1. Cash in

To “cash in” means to collect money or rewards that you have earned or are entitled to.

  • For example, “After years of hard work, he finally cashed in on his investment.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business venture, someone might say, “They really cashed in on that opportunity.”
  • A person talking about a promotion might say, “I’m excited to cash in on the benefits and higher salary.”

2. Rake in

To “rake in” means to make a large amount of money or profits, often quickly or easily.

  • For instance, “The company raked in millions of dollars in sales.”
  • In a conversation about a successful product launch, someone might say, “They really raked in the profits.”
  • A person discussing a lucrative business might say, “They’re raking in the cash with their new venture.”

3. Harvest

To “harvest” means to gather or collect resources or rewards, often in a metaphorical sense.

  • For example, “They harvested a bumper crop of apples this year.”
  • In a discussion about reaping the benefits of hard work, someone might say, “It’s time to harvest the rewards.”
  • A person talking about a successful project might say, “We’re ready to harvest the results of our efforts.”

4. Gather

To “gather” means to accumulate or collect something, often in a gradual or deliberate manner.

  • For instance, “They gathered a large audience for their presentation.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, someone might say, “I’m trying to gather enough for a down payment.”
  • A person discussing the benefits of networking might say, “It’s important to gather contacts and connections.”

5. Profit

To “profit” means to make a financial gain or benefit from something.

  • For example, “They profited greatly from their investment in the stock market.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business, someone might say, “They’re profiting from their innovative products.”
  • A person talking about a successful sale might say, “I was able to profit from the transaction.”

6. Score

In the context of “reap,” “score” means to achieve or obtain something. It can refer to achieving success, gaining a point in a game, or getting something desired.

  • For example, someone might say, “I scored a job interview with my dream company.”
  • In a sports context, a fan might shout, “We scored a touchdown!”
  • A person discussing their shopping experience might say, “I scored a great deal on this dress.”

7. Bag

To “bag” something means to obtain or acquire it. It can refer to getting something desired or achieving a goal.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I finally bagged that promotion I’ve been working towards.”
  • In a hunting context, a person might say, “I bagged a deer on my hunting trip.”
  • A person discussing their shopping haul might say, “I bagged some great deals during the Black Friday sale.”

8. Net

In the context of “reap,” “net” means to gain or acquire something. It can refer to gaining profit, achieving a result, or obtaining a desired outcome.

  • For example, someone might say, “I netted a huge profit from my business venture.”
  • In a sports context, a fan might say, “Our team netted a win in the championship.”
  • A person discussing their investments might say, “I netted a significant return on my stocks.”

9. Win

To “win” in the context of “reap” means to succeed or achieve a desired outcome. It can refer to winning a competition, achieving a goal, or obtaining a favorable result.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I won first place in the swimming competition.”
  • In a game context, a player might say, “I won the match with a checkmate.”
  • A person discussing their career might say, “I won the promotion I’ve been working towards.”

10. Obtain

To “obtain” in the context of “reap” means to acquire or get hold of something. It can refer to obtaining an object, achieving a result, or gaining possession of something desired.

  • For example, someone might say, “I obtained a copy of the rare book I’ve been searching for.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might say, “We obtained the necessary evidence to support our case.”
  • A person discussing their goals might say, “I obtained my dream job after years of hard work.”

11. Acquire

To obtain or get possession of something. “Acquire” is often used to emphasize the act of obtaining something, especially in a deliberate or intentional manner.

  • For example, a business might say, “We need to acquire more customers to expand our market.”
  • A person discussing their collection might say, “I’ve been able to acquire some rare and valuable items over the years.”
  • In a discussion about personal development, someone might mention, “Acquiring new skills is essential for career growth.”

12. Secure

To obtain, achieve, or protect something. “Secure” can refer to obtaining something that is desired or protecting something that is valuable or important.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to secure a loan to buy a new car.”
  • A business might focus on securing their data and say, “We have implemented multiple layers of security to protect our customers’ information.”
  • In a discussion about personal safety, someone might advise, “Always secure your belongings and be aware of your surroundings.”

13. Collect

To gather or accumulate things, often as a hobby or for a specific purpose. “Collect” is commonly used to refer to the act of gathering items of a similar type or theme.

  • For example, a person might say, “I collect stamps from around the world.”
  • A fan of a particular artist might say, “I’ve been collecting their albums since I was a teenager.”
  • In a discussion about antiques, someone might mention, “Collecting rare and valuable items can be a lucrative investment.”

14. Snag

To catch or obtain something, often unexpectedly or with difficulty. “Snag” is commonly used to describe the act of obtaining something that is desired or needed, but may require effort or luck.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I was able to snag tickets to the sold-out concert.”
  • A shopper might say, “I snagged a great deal on this designer handbag during the sale.”
  • In a discussion about fishing, someone might say, “I managed to snag a big trout on my last trip.”

15. Seize

To take hold of or obtain something, often forcefully or abruptly. “Seize” is often used to describe the act of taking control or possession of something, either physically or metaphorically.

  • For example, a government might say, “We will seize the smuggled goods and prosecute those responsible.”
  • A person discussing opportunities might say, “You have to seize the moment when it presents itself.”
  • In a discussion about power, someone might mention, “Those in authority often seek to seize more control and influence.”

16. Procure

To obtain or acquire something, often through effort or negotiation. “Procure” is a more formal term for obtaining something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to procure some supplies for the project.”
  • In a business context, someone might discuss, “The company’s ability to procure new clients.”
  • A character in a heist movie might say, “We need to procure the necessary tools for the job.”

17. Realize

To become aware of something or to understand a situation or fact. “Realize” can also mean to achieve or fulfill something.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I didn’t realize how much work this project would be.”
  • A person might have a moment of realization and exclaim, “I just realized what I’ve been doing wrong all along!”
  • In a conversation about goals, someone might say, “I hope to realize my dreams of becoming a successful entrepreneur.”

18. Attain

To succeed in reaching a goal or obtaining something through effort and determination. “Attain” often implies a sense of accomplishment.

  • For example, a person might say, “I have finally attained my dream job.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “Attaining inner peace is a lifelong journey.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience to “set ambitious goals and work hard to attain them.”
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19. Gain

To acquire or get possession of something, often through effort, skill, or luck. “Gain” can also refer to an increase in something, such as knowledge or wealth.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I want to gain more experience in my field.”
  • In a conversation about fitness, a person might discuss, “The importance of gaining strength and endurance.”
  • A character in a book might say, “He worked hard to gain the trust of his teammates.”

20. Reclaim

To retrieve or recover something that was lost, taken away, or forgotten. “Reclaim” often implies a sense of taking back or restoring something to its rightful owner or state.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to reclaim my personal space.”
  • A person might discuss the importance of reclaiming one’s identity after a difficult experience.
  • In a conversation about the environment, someone might advocate for efforts to reclaim and restore polluted land.

21. Pocket

When someone “pockets” something, they are taking or acquiring it, often in a sly or discreet way.

  • For example, “He pocketed some extra cash from the tip jar when no one was looking.”
  • In a discussion about stealing, someone might say, “She’s known for pocketing small items from stores.”
  • A person might brag, “I pocketed a few free samples from the event.”

22. Fetch

When someone “fetches” something, they are obtaining or bringing it in, often with some degree of effort or skill.

  • For instance, “He fetched a high price for his artwork at the auction.”
  • In a conversation about finding rare items, someone might say, “I was able to fetch a vintage vinyl record from a thrift store.”
  • A person might boast, “I can fetch the best deals at yard sales.”

23. Hoard

When someone “hoards” something, they are accumulating or gathering a large quantity of it, often to the point of excess.

  • For example, “She hoarded so many books that her shelves were overflowing.”
  • In a discussion about collecting, someone might say, “He hoards comic books and has thousands in his collection.”
  • A person might admit, “I tend to hoard craft supplies because I always think I’ll use them someday.”

24. Snatch

When someone “snatches” something, they are taking or grabbing it quickly and forcefully.

  • For instance, “He snatched the last slice of pizza before anyone else could reach it.”
  • In a conversation about theft, someone might say, “She snatched a purse from a distracted tourist.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I finally managed to snatch tickets to the sold-out concert!”

25. Garner

When someone “garners” something, they are gathering or collecting it, often through their own effort or hard work.

  • For example, “She garnered praise for her performance in the play.”
  • In a discussion about awards, someone might say, “The film managed to garner several prestigious nominations.”
  • A person might proudly state, “I’ve been able to garner a large following on social media.”

26. Hit

To successfully complete a task or achieve a goal. “Hit” is often used to describe achieving success or making progress.

  • For example, someone might say, “I hit my sales target for the month.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “He hit a home run to win the game.”
  • A student might say, “I hit the books all night to prepare for the exam.”

27. Succeed

To accomplish a desired outcome or reach a goal. “Succeed” is a more formal term for achieving success or attaining a desired result.

  • For instance, a motivational speaker might say, “Believe in yourself and you will succeed.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “Our team’s hard work paid off and we succeeded in securing the contract.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students by saying, “If you study hard, you will succeed academically.”

28. Emerge

To come into view or become noticeable. “Emerge” is often used to describe a situation where something or someone becomes visible or known.

  • For example, a new artist might emerge in the music industry and gain popularity.
  • In a political context, a new leader might emerge as a frontrunner in an election.
  • A problem might emerge during a project, requiring a solution to be found.
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29. Reel in

To attract or capture someone’s attention or interest. “Reel in” is often used to describe the act of drawing someone in or getting them hooked on something.

  • For instance, a catchy advertising slogan might reel in customers and make them interested in a product.
  • In a dating context, someone might say, “He really knows how to reel in a crowd with his charm.”
  • A writer might aim to reel in readers with a captivating opening sentence.

30. Draw in

To attract or entice someone or something. “Draw in” is often used to describe the act of pulling someone or something closer or getting them involved.

  • For example, a captivating story might draw in readers and keep them engaged.
  • In a social context, a person’s charisma might draw in a large crowd of followers.
  • A teacher might use interactive activities to draw in students and make the lesson more engaging.

31. Come by

To obtain or get something, often through effort or by chance.

  • For example, “I need to come by some extra cash for the weekend.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll come by your place later to pick up that book.”
  • In a conversation about finding a rare item, someone might ask, “Do you know where I can come by a vintage record player?”

32. Pull in

To make or receive money, often through work or a specific activity.

  • For instance, “He pulls in a decent salary at his job.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been pulling in some extra cash by freelancing.”
  • In a discussion about side hustles, someone might suggest, “You can pull in some extra income by renting out a spare room.”

33. Take home

To earn or receive a specific amount of money, often as income or profit.

  • For example, “She takes home a good paycheck every month.”
  • A person might say, “After taxes, I usually take home around $500.”
  • In a conversation about business success, someone might mention, “Their company takes home millions in revenue each year.”