Top 46 Slang For Making Money – Meaning & Usage

In the world of finance and entrepreneurship, there’s a whole language of slang and jargon that’s used to talk about making money. Whether you’re a seasoned investor or just starting out on your entrepreneurial journey, it’s important to understand the lingo. That’s where we come in. We’ve compiled a list of the top slang for making money that will not only help you navigate the world of finance, but also impress your friends and colleagues with your financial savvy. Get ready to level up your money game!

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1. Dough

This term is used to refer to money, particularly in the form of cash. It is a common slang word for currency.

  • For example, “I need to make some extra dough to pay my bills.”
  • A person might say, “I’m rolling in dough after winning the lottery.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “Do you have enough dough to cover the expenses?”

2. Benjamins

This slang term specifically refers to one-hundred dollar bills. It is derived from the portrait of Benjamin Franklin, which is featured on the front of the bill.

  • For instance, “He made it rain with Benjamins at the strip club.”
  • A person might say, “I need to save up some Benjamins for a down payment on a car.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, someone might comment, “He’s got stacks of Benjamins in his safe.”

3. Cheddar

This slang term is used to refer to money, similar to “dough.” It is often associated with the color of cheese, which is yellow like some forms of currency.

  • For example, “He’s making some serious cheddar with his new business venture.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find a side hustle to earn some extra cheddar.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, someone might comment, “She’s rolling in cheddar with her high-paying job.”

4. Stacks

This term is used to describe a large amount of money, typically in the form of cash. It refers to a stack of bills, similar to how money is often depicted in movies.

  • For instance, “He’s got stacks of cash hidden in his mattress.”
  • A person might say, “I need to hustle and make some stacks to pay off my debts.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might comment, “I want to save up enough to have stacks of money in my bank account.”

5. Bread

This slang term is used to refer to money, similar to “dough” and “cheddar.” It is thought to come from the phrase “earning bread,” which means earning a living.

  • For example, “He’s always looking for ways to earn more bread.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find a job that pays better bread.”
  • In a conversation about financial stability, someone might comment, “I finally have enough bread to start saving for retirement.”

6. Loot

Loot is a slang term for money or valuable items that have been acquired, usually through illegal means or as a result of a successful endeavor.

  • For example, a thief might say, “I made off with a lot of loot from that heist.”
  • In a video game, a player might exclaim, “I just found a chest full of loot!”
  • A successful entrepreneur might boast, “I built my business from scratch and now I’m swimming in loot!”

7. Cashola

Cashola is a slang term used to refer to money in a casual or playful manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need some cashola to pay my bills.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some cashola until payday?”
  • A person might joke, “I’m not made of cashola, you know!”

8. Greenbacks

Greenbacks is a slang term used to refer to US paper currency, particularly the color of the bills.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need some greenbacks to buy groceries.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I found a stack of greenbacks hidden in an old shoe!”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you spare some greenbacks for a concert ticket?”

9. Scratch

Scratch is a slang term used to refer to money, often in a casual or informal context.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to earn some scratch to pay my rent.”
  • A person might ask, “How much scratch did you make from that side gig?”
  • A friend might joke, “I’m always broke, I never have any scratch!”

10. Cabbage

Cabbage is a slang term used to refer to money, often in a lighthearted or humorous manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to earn some cabbage to go on vacation.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I just won a ton of cabbage in the lottery!”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some cabbage until payday?”

11. Cheese

This slang term refers to money, particularly in the form of cash. It is often used informally to talk about large amounts of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made some serious cheese from that business deal.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “How much cheese do you have saved up?”
  • A friend might joke, “I need to find a way to make some easy cheese.”

12. Paper

This term is used to refer to money, specifically in the form of bills or banknotes. It is commonly used in casual conversation and can be used interchangeably with the word “money”.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to go to the ATM and get some paper.”
  • In a discussion about finances, a person might ask, “Do you have enough paper to cover the expenses?”
  • A friend might say, “I’m short on paper right now, can you lend me some?”

13. Coinage

This slang term refers to money, specifically in the form of coins. It is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found some spare change in my pocket, looks like I have some coinage.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “Do you have any spare coinage for the parking meter?”
  • A friend might joke, “I need to start collecting more coinage, I’m running low on funds.”

14. Moola

This term is used to refer to money in a casual or slangy way. It is often used informally and can be used interchangeably with the word “money”.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a lot of moola from that side gig.”
  • In a discussion about finances, a person might ask, “How much moola do you have saved up?”
  • A friend might joke, “I need to find a way to make some quick moola.”

15. Bucks

This slang term refers to money, specifically in the form of dollars. It is commonly used in casual conversation and can be used interchangeably with the word “money”.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just earned a few bucks for doing that job.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “How many bucks do you need to borrow?”
  • A friend might say, “I need to start saving more bucks for that vacation.”

16. Wad

A “wad” refers to a thick stack or bundle of cash, usually consisting of large bills. It is slang for a significant amount of money.

  • For example, a person might say, “He pulled out a wad of cash to pay for the car.”
  • In a discussion about extravagant spending, someone might mention, “She dropped a wad of money on designer clothes.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a wad until I get my paycheck?”

17. Loots

In slang terms, “loots” refers to money that has been acquired through illegal or dishonest means. It often implies that the money was obtained through criminal activities.

  • For instance, a character in a movie might say, “He’s been living large off his loots.”
  • In a discussion about corrupt politicians, someone might comment, “They’re just in it for the loots.”
  • A person might warn, “Stay away from that guy, he’s involved in some shady loots.”

18. Bank

When someone says they have “bank,” it means they have a significant amount of money. It can refer to personal wealth or a large sum of money in general.

  • For example, a person might say, “I just made bank from my latest business venture.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, someone might mention, “He’s been banking ever since he started his own company.”
  • A friend might ask, “How did you make so much bank in such a short time?”

19. Payday

“Payday” refers to the specific day when an individual receives their salary or wages. It is often associated with a sense of excitement and anticipation for the arrival of money.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I can’t wait for payday to treat myself to something nice.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I always save a portion of my paycheck on payday.”
  • A friend might ask, “What are your plans for payday? Going out or saving up?”

20. Jackpot

In slang terms, hitting the “jackpot” means experiencing a significant or unexpected financial gain. It is often used to describe winning a large sum of money, often through gambling or a stroke of luck.

  • For example, a person might say, “I hit the jackpot with this investment.”
  • In a conversation about lottery winners, someone might mention, “They really hit the jackpot with that ticket.”
  • A friend might exclaim, “You won the jackpot? That’s incredible!”

21. Stash

This term refers to a hidden or secret place where someone keeps their money or other valuable items. It can also be used to describe a large amount of money that someone has saved or accumulated.

  • For example, “I have a stash of cash hidden under my mattress.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, someone might say, “It’s important to have a stash of emergency funds.”
  • A person boasting about their wealth might say, “I’ve got a stash of diamonds worth millions.”

22. Gravy

This term is used to describe money that is earned with little effort or difficulty. It implies that the money comes easily and without much work.

  • For instance, “Winning the lottery was like gravy for him.”
  • In a conversation about a well-paying job, someone might say, “Working in tech is gravy.”
  • A person talking about a profitable investment might say, “I made some gravy on that stock.”

23. Scratchings

This term is used to refer to money or cash. It is often used in a casual or colloquial context.

  • For example, “I need some scratchings to pay my bills.”
  • In a discussion about financial struggles, someone might say, “I’m running low on scratchings.”
  • A person talking about a successful business might say, “That store is bringing in the scratchings.”

24. Filthy rich

This term is used to describe someone who is incredibly wealthy or rich. It emphasizes the abundance of wealth and implies that the person’s riches are excessive or extravagant.

  • For instance, “He inherited his father’s fortune and became filthy rich.”
  • In a conversation about luxury lifestyles, someone might say, “Only the filthy rich can afford yachts.”
  • A person talking about a billionaire might say, “They’re not just rich, they’re filthy rich.”

25. Fat stacks

This term is used to describe a significant amount of money, usually in the form of cash. It implies that the money is stacked or piled up, emphasizing its quantity.

  • For example, “He made it rain with fat stacks of cash at the club.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business venture, someone might say, “We’re making fat stacks of money.”
  • A person showing off their wealth might say, “Check out my fat stacks of hundred-dollar bills.”

26. Cash

Cash refers to physical currency, typically in the form of bills or coins. It can also be used more broadly to mean any form of money, including digital transactions.

  • For example, “I need to withdraw some cash from the ATM.”
  • A person might say, “I paid for the concert tickets in cash.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “It’s always good to have some cash on hand for emergencies.”

27. Dosh

Dosh is a slang term for money, commonly used in British English. It can be used to refer to any form of currency.

  • For instance, “I need to save up some dosh for my vacation.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one might say, “I spent all my dosh on new clothes.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a wealthy individual, saying, “He’s got plenty of dosh to spare.”

28. Cake

Cake is a slang term for money, often used to refer to a significant amount of cash.

  • For example, “He made a lot of cake from his business venture.”
  • In a discussion about earning income, someone might say, “I need to find a job that pays cake.”
  • A person might describe a wealthy individual as “rolling in cake.”
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29. Moolah

Moolah is a slang term for money, typically used in American English. It can be used to refer to any form of currency.

  • For instance, “I need to save up some moolah for a new car.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might say, “I spent all my moolah on vacation.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a wealthy individual, saying, “She’s got plenty of moolah to spare.”

30. Jack

Jack is a slang term for money, commonly used in American English. It can be used to refer to any form of currency.

  • For example, “I need to earn some jack to pay my bills.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might say, “I want to save up a lot of jack for retirement.”
  • A person might describe a lucrative opportunity as a “chance to make some serious jack.”

31. Benjis

This term refers to hundred-dollar bills, which feature a portrait of Benjamin Franklin. “Benjis” is a slang term often used to refer to money in general, but specifically to hundred-dollar bills.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a stack of Benjis from my side hustle.”
  • In a song about wealth, a rapper might boast, “I’m swimming in Benjis, making it rain.”
  • A person discussing a large purchase might say, “I had to drop a few Benjis on that new TV.”

32. Skrilla

This term is a slang word for money, specifically referring to cash. It can be used to describe any amount of money, from a small sum to a large fortune.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to make some skrilla to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, one might say, “He’s rolling in skrilla after starting his own business.”
  • A person discussing a financial windfall might exclaim, “I just came into some serious skrilla!”

33. Wampum

This term originates from Native American culture, specifically referring to small cylindrical beads made from shells, which were used as currency by certain tribes. Today, “wampum” is a slang term for money or wealth in general.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m trying to save up some wampum for a vacation.”
  • In a discussion about financial success, one might say, “He’s got plenty of wampum after investing in the stock market.”
  • A person discussing a luxurious lifestyle might say, “Living in a mansion and driving a sports car takes a lot of wampum.”

34. Scrilla

This term is a slang word for money, specifically referring to cash. It can be used to describe any amount of money, from a small sum to a large fortune.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to make some scrilla to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, one might say, “He’s rolling in scrilla after starting his own business.”
  • A person discussing a financial windfall might exclaim, “I just came into some serious scrilla!”

35. C-note

This term refers to a one hundred dollar bill, which features the image of Benjamin Franklin. The “C” in “C-note” represents the Roman numeral for one hundred. It is a slang term often used to refer to a hundred dollar bill specifically.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a C-note on the ground today, lucky me!”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, one might say, “That jacket cost me a whole C-note.”
  • A person discussing saving money might say, “I’m putting away a C-note every week to reach my savings goal.”

36. Rainmaker

This term refers to someone who has the ability to bring in a large amount of money or business to a company or organization. A rainmaker is often seen as a highly skilled and influential individual in the field of finance or sales.

  • For example, a business executive might say, “John is a rainmaker for our company. He always manages to close the big deals.”
  • In a discussion about successful entrepreneurs, someone might mention, “Steve Jobs was a true rainmaker in the tech industry.”
  • A financial consultant might advise, “To become a rainmaker, you need to build strong relationships and have a knack for identifying lucrative opportunities.”

37. Sugar mama

This term refers to an older woman who provides financial support to a younger person, often in exchange for companionship or romantic involvement. The term “sugar mama” is typically used in the context of a romantic relationship where there is an imbalance of financial power.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s dating a sugar mama who pays for all his expenses.”
  • In a discussion about unconventional relationships, a person might mention, “Sugar mamas and sugar daddies are becoming increasingly common in today’s society.”
  • A friend might jokingly ask, “Do you think I can find myself a sugar mama to fund my lifestyle?”

38. Tycoon

This term refers to a person who has achieved great wealth and success in the business world. A tycoon is often seen as a powerful and influential figure, with significant control over their industry or market.

  • For example, a news article might describe Elon Musk as a “tech tycoon” due to his success with companies like Tesla and SpaceX.
  • In a discussion about historical figures, someone might mention, “Andrew Carnegie was a tycoon in the steel industry.”
  • A business student might aspire to become a tycoon and say, “I want to build my own empire and become a successful tycoon in the future.”

39. Whales

This term refers to individuals who have significant financial resources and are known for spending large amounts of money, often in the context of luxury goods, entertainment, or gambling. The term “whales” is commonly used in industries such as casinos and high-end retail.

  • For instance, a casino might offer special perks and incentives to attract whales to their establishment.
  • In a discussion about luxury brands, someone might mention, “Whales are the target customers for high-end fashion houses.”
  • A financial advisor might caution against trying to cater exclusively to whales and say, “It’s important to diversify your customer base instead of relying solely on whales.”

40. Deep pockets

This term refers to someone who has a significant amount of money or financial resources at their disposal. The term “deep pockets” implies that the person is capable of spending large sums of money without experiencing financial strain.

  • For example, a real estate agent might describe a potential buyer as having “deep pockets” and say, “They can afford any property they want.”
  • In a discussion about fundraising, someone might mention, “We need to find donors with deep pockets to support our cause.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “I wish I had deep pockets so I could buy all the things I want without worrying about money.”

41. Fat cat

This term is used to describe someone who is extremely rich or powerful, especially in a business or political context.

  • For example, “The fat cats in the banking industry continue to profit while ordinary people suffer.”
  • In a discussion about corporate greed, one might say, “The fat cats at the top are only interested in their own wealth.”
  • A person might aspire to become a fat cat and say, “I’m working hard to join the ranks of the fat cats in the industry.”

42. Loaded

This slang term is used to describe someone who is financially well-off or has a lot of money.

  • For instance, “He’s loaded with cash, he can buy whatever he wants.”
  • In a conversation about luxury lifestyles, one might say, “She lives in a mansion and drives a sports car, she’s definitely loaded.”
  • A person might comment on someone’s extravagant purchase and say, “Wow, he must be loaded to afford that.”

43. Money-spinner

This term refers to something that generates a lot of money or is very profitable.

  • For example, “Investing in real estate can be a money-spinner if you make the right choices.”
  • In a discussion about business opportunities, one might say, “Starting a tech company can be a real money-spinner if you hit the market at the right time.”
  • A person might share their success story and say, “I turned my hobby into a money-spinner by selling my handmade crafts online.”

44. Sugar baby

This term is used to describe a young person, typically a woman, who is in a relationship with an older, wealthier individual in exchange for financial support or gifts.

  • For instance, “She’s his sugar baby, he pays for her expenses and takes her on luxurious vacations.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, one might say, “Some people choose to become sugar babies to enjoy a more lavish lifestyle.”
  • A person might share their perspective and say, “Being a sugar baby is a personal choice, and it’s important to set boundaries and prioritize your own well-being.”

45. Well-heeled

This term is used to describe someone who is financially well-off or has a lot of money.

  • For example, “He comes from a well-heeled family and has never had to worry about money.”
  • In a conversation about luxury brands, one might say, “Only the well-heeled can afford to shop at that high-end boutique.”
  • A person might comment on someone’s extravagant lifestyle and say, “She’s living the well-heeled life with her luxury vacations and designer wardrobe.”

46. Bill

A common term for the United States dollar, which is the official currency of the country. “Bill” is often used as a slang term for money in general, but it specifically refers to the dollar bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to pay my bills,” meaning they need to pay their expenses.
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “Do you have any bills on you?” meaning if they have any cash.
  • A person might exclaim, “I found a 100-dollar bill on the street!” indicating they found a valuable banknote.
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