Top 50 Slang For Making Money – Meaning & Usage

Making money is a universal goal, and there are countless ways to achieve it. However, the world of finance and business can often seem like a foreign language with its own set of terms and slang. That’s where we come in. At FluentSlang, we’ve tapped into our extensive knowledge of the financial world to bring you a list of the top slang for making money. Whether you’re an aspiring entrepreneur or simply curious about the language of wealth, this listicle is sure to provide you with some valuable insights and maybe even a few laughs along the way.

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1. Stackin’ paper

This slang phrase refers to the act of making or saving a significant amount of money. It implies building up a large stack of paper currency.

  • For example, “I’ve been working overtime, stackin’ paper like crazy.”
  • A person might boast, “I’m stackin’ paper and living the good life.”
  • Another might say, “I’m focused on stackin’ paper and securing my future.”

2. Rolling in dough

This phrase suggests that someone is extremely wealthy or financially well-off. The term “dough” is a colloquial term for money.

  • For instance, “After winning the lottery, he’s been rolling in dough.”
  • A person might say, “I wish I could be rolling in dough like the celebrities.”
  • Another might comment, “If I had a million dollars, I’d be rolling in dough.”

3. Raking it in

This slang phrase means to make a significant amount of money, often in a short period of time. It implies the action of collecting money as if one were raking leaves.

  • For example, “Ever since he started his own business, he’s been raking it in.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been raking it in with my freelance gigs.”
  • Another might comment, “The company is raking it in with their new product launch.”

4. Cashing in

This phrase refers to the act of making money or benefiting from a situation. It can also imply cashing in on an investment or cashing in on one’s skills or talents.

  • For instance, “She’s cashing in on her popularity by launching her own line of products.”
  • A person might say, “I’m cashing in on my coding skills by freelancing.”
  • Another might comment, “The company is cashing in on the latest technology trend.”

5. Making bank

This slang phrase means to make a significant amount of money, often in a consistent or regular manner. It implies the action of accumulating a substantial sum of money.

  • For example, “He’s been making bank with his successful business venture.”
  • A person might boast, “I’m making bank and living the high life.”
  • Another might comment, “If I get this promotion, I’ll be making bank.”

6. Cheddar

This term is slang for money, specifically referring to a large sum of cash. It is often used to describe a significant amount of wealth or income.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s rolling in cheddar after winning the lottery.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I need to save up some cheddar for a down payment on a house.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m making cheddar with my latest album release.”

7. Cash

This is a common slang term for money in general. It is a straightforward and widely understood term for currency or funds.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to withdraw some cash from the ATM.”
  • In a discussion about paying for something, a person might ask, “Do you have enough cash to cover the bill?”
  • A friend might lend money and say, “Here’s some cash to help you out.”

8. Moolah

This slang term is used to refer to money or cash. It is a playful and lighthearted way to talk about finances.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to earn some moolah to afford that vacation.”
  • In a conversation about a job opportunity, a person might ask, “How much moolah does it pay?”
  • A friend might joke, “Hey, can you lend me some moolah until payday?”

9. Loot

This term is slang for money, often used to refer to a large sum of cash or valuable items. It can also refer to the act of acquiring wealth or possessions.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He made a ton of loot from his successful business.”
  • In a discussion about a successful heist movie, a person might comment, “They got away with a lot of loot in that film.”
  • A person might talk about their financial goals and say, “I’m working hard to accumulate some serious loot.”

10. Bread

This slang term is used to refer to money, specifically cash. It is a casual way to talk about finances or funds.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to earn some bread to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about a job offer, a person might ask, “How much bread does it pay?”
  • A friend might borrow money and say, “Can you lend me some bread until I get paid?”

11. Stacks

“After winning the lottery, he had stacks of cash.”

  • “The rapper showed off his stacks of hundred-dollar bills on social media.”
  • “She’s always hustling and stacking her money.”

12. Paper

“He’s always chasing after that paper.”

  • “I need to find a way to make more paper.”
  • “She’s got a lot of paper saved up.”
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13. Greenbacks

“He pulled out a wad of greenbacks to pay for the meal.”

  • “She counted her greenbacks and realized she had enough to buy a new car.”
  • “He’s got a wallet full of greenbacks.”

14. Scratch

“I need to find a way to make some scratch.”

  • “He’s always trying to hustle and make scratch.”
  • “She’s got a job that brings in a lot of scratch.”

15. Cabbage

“He’s rolling in cabbage after his business took off.”

  • “She’s got a lot of cabbage saved up for a rainy day.”
  • “He’s got a wallet full of cabbage.”

16. Coin

This term is a slang for money, often referring to physical currency in the form of coins. It can also be used to refer to money in general.

  • For example, “I need some coins to do laundry.”
  • A person might say, “I found a coin on the ground.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “Do you have any spare coins?”

17. Bucks

“Bucks” is a slang term for dollars or money in general. It is often used colloquially to refer to a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, “I need to save up a few bucks before I can buy that new video game.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m willing to pay big bucks for that rare collectible.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “How many bucks do you have?”

18. Wad

A “wad” is a slang term for a bundle of money, usually referring to a thick stack of bills.

  • For example, “He pulled out a wad of cash to pay for the expensive meal.”
  • A person might say, “I need to withdraw a wad of money from the bank.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “I saw a guy with a wad of hundred-dollar bills at the casino.”

19. Bank

In slang terms, “bank” refers to a large amount of money or wealth. It can also be used to mean a financial institution.

  • For instance, “He made bank on that business deal.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to go to the bank to deposit my paycheck.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “How much bank do you have?”

20. Cheese

This term is a slang for money, often used to refer to paper currency. It can also be used to mean money in general.

  • For example, “I need some cheese to buy groceries.”
  • A person might say, “I found a stack of cheese in my jacket pocket.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might mention, “I’m saving up some cheese for a vacation.”

21. Breadwinner

This term refers to the person in a household who earns the majority of the income and supports the family financially. The breadwinner is responsible for providing for the needs of the family.

  • For example, “My dad is the breadwinner in our family.”
  • In a discussion about gender roles, someone might say, “Traditionally, the husband was expected to be the breadwinner.”
  • A financial advisor might give advice on managing money for the breadwinner, saying, “It’s important for the breadwinner to have a solid financial plan in place.”

22. Gravy train

This slang term refers to a situation or opportunity that allows someone to make a lot of money with minimal effort. It implies that the money comes easily and without much work.

  • For instance, “Investing in real estate during a housing boom can be a gravy train.”
  • In a conversation about job opportunities, someone might say, “Working in tech can be a gravy train if you have the right skills.”
  • A person might comment on a successful business venture, saying, “They’re riding the gravy train with their new startup.”

23. Jackpot

This term is often used to describe a large sum of money won through gambling or a lucky windfall. It signifies a significant financial success or stroke of luck.

  • For example, “She hit the jackpot at the casino and won a million dollars.”
  • In a discussion about investing, someone might say, “Finding the next big tech stock is like hitting the jackpot.”
  • A person might comment on a fortunate turn of events, saying, “I found a rare collectible in my attic. It’s like hitting the jackpot!”

24. Mint

This slang term describes a large amount of money or wealth. It implies that someone has a substantial financial worth or assets.

  • For instance, “He inherited a mint from his wealthy grandparents.”
  • In a conversation about successful entrepreneurs, someone might say, “They built a successful company and made a mint.”
  • A person might comment on a luxurious lifestyle, saying, “Living in that mansion must have cost a mint.”

25. Payday

This term refers to the day when someone receives their salary or wages. It signifies the day when one gets paid for their work.

  • For example, “I can’t wait for payday so I can go shopping.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, someone might say, “Make sure to budget your expenses until the next payday.”
  • A person might comment on the joy of payday, saying, “It’s always a great feeling to see that direct deposit hit your bank account on payday.”

26. Big bucks

This slang term is used to describe a significant sum of money. It emphasizes the idea of a substantial financial gain.

  • For example, “He made big bucks from his successful business venture.”
  • In a conversation about job opportunities, someone might say, “That job pays big bucks.”
  • A person discussing a lottery win might exclaim, “I just won big bucks!”

27. Fat cat

This term refers to someone who is rich, powerful, and often associated with corporate or political success. It conveys the idea of someone who has amassed a significant amount of wealth and wields influence.

  • For instance, “He’s a fat cat in the banking industry.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might say, “Fat cats at the top continue to get richer.”
  • A person might describe a successful entrepreneur as a “fat cat.”
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28. Sugar daddy

This slang term is used to describe a man who provides financial assistance or gifts to a younger person, often in a romantic or companionship context. It implies a mutually beneficial relationship where the younger person receives financial support in exchange for their company.

  • For example, “She’s dating a sugar daddy who spoils her with expensive gifts.”
  • In a conversation about unconventional relationships, someone might mention, “There are websites where you can find a sugar daddy.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I need to find myself a sugar daddy to fund my shopping addiction.”

29. Goldmine

This term refers to something that is highly valuable or profitable. It conveys the idea of a rich source of income or a lucrative opportunity.

  • For instance, “The real estate market in that area is a goldmine.”
  • In a discussion about investments, someone might say, “I struck gold with that stock pick – it’s been a goldmine.”
  • A person might describe a successful business as a “goldmine.”

30. Bankroll

This term is used to describe the act of providing financial support or funding for a venture or activity. It implies having enough money to back or finance a particular endeavor.

  • For example, “He bankrolled the production of the independent film.”
  • In a conversation about starting a business, someone might say, “I need someone to bankroll my idea.”
  • A person might discuss a wealthy investor who is willing to bankroll a project.

31. Coinage

This term refers to the actual physical money, whether in the form of coins or paper bills. It can also be used metaphorically to mean money in general.

  • For example, “I need to go to the bank and get some coinage for the parking meter.”
  • In a discussion about the economy, someone might say, “The government is responsible for regulating the coinage.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I have so much coinage, I could swim in it.”

32. C-Note

This slang term is used to refer to a one hundred dollar bill. It comes from the Roman numeral “C” for one hundred.

  • For instance, “I had to pay my rent with a C-note.”
  • In a conversation about tipping, someone might say, “I always leave a C-note for exceptional service.”
  • A person discussing their expenses might say, “I spent a couple of C-notes on concert tickets.”

33. Stash

This term refers to a secret or hidden supply of money, typically kept for emergencies or future use. It can also be used to describe a large amount of money in general.

  • For example, “I keep a stash of cash in case of emergencies.”
  • In a discussion about savings, someone might say, “I’m trying to build up my stash for a down payment on a house.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I have a stash of cash hidden away.”

34. Grind

In the context of making money, “grind” refers to putting in consistent and persistent effort to earn a living or achieve financial success.

  • For instance, “I have to grind every day to make ends meet.”
  • In a conversation about entrepreneurship, someone might say, “Starting a business requires a lot of grind.”
  • A person discussing their work ethic might say, “I’m not afraid of the grind; I’m willing to put in the effort.”

35. Hustle

Similar to “grind,” “hustle” refers to working hard and putting in a lot of effort to achieve financial success. It can also imply a sense of resourcefulness and finding creative ways to make money.

  • For example, “I hustle every day to make a living.”
  • In a discussion about side hustles, someone might say, “I have multiple hustles to supplement my income.”
  • A person describing their work ethic might say, “I’m always hustling and looking for opportunities to make money.”

36. Racks

This term refers to a significant sum of money, often in the form of cash. It is typically used to describe a substantial amount of wealth or earnings.

  • For example, “After winning the lottery, he was rolling in racks.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s financial success, one might say, “She’s got racks on racks.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I make racks every time I drop a new album.”

37. Moola

This slang term is used as a synonym for money. It is a playful and lighthearted way to refer to cash or wealth.

  • For instance, “I need to save up some moola for my vacation.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me some moola until payday?”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might say, “I’m trying to earn more moola this year.”

38. Jack

“Jack” is a slang term for money. It is a casual way to refer to cash or earnings.

  • For example, “I need to make some jack before the end of the month.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s financial success, one might say, “He’s got a lot of jack in his bank account.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you spare some jack for gas?”

39. Bread and butter

This phrase refers to one’s primary or main source of income. It represents the essential earnings that sustain a person’s livelihood.

  • For instance, “His job as a software engineer is his bread and butter.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might say, “I’m looking for a stable job that can be my bread and butter.”
  • A person might ask, “What’s your bread and butter? What do you do for a living?”

40. Filthy rich

This term describes someone who is extremely wealthy or has an abundance of money. It implies that the person’s wealth is excessive or even morally questionable.

  • For example, “The CEO of that company is filthy rich.”
  • In a discussion about billionaires, someone might say, “They’re all filthy rich.”
  • A person might comment, “I wish I could be filthy rich and never have to worry about money again.”

41. Loaded

To be “loaded” means to have a lot of money or wealth. It implies being financially well-off or having an abundance of resources.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s loaded, he can afford to buy anything he wants.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s financial status, one might ask, “Is he loaded?”
  • A person might boast, “I just got a promotion, now I’m loaded!”

42. Rolling in it

To be “rolling in it” means to have a significant amount of money or wealth. It suggests that someone is extremely affluent and may even have an excess of resources.

  • For instance, a person might say, “After winning the lottery, she’s rolling in it.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s financial success, one might comment, “He’s really rolling in it now.”
  • A person might envy someone else’s wealth and say, “I wish I were rolling in it like him.”

43. Living the high life

To be “living the high life” means to enjoy a luxurious lifestyle, often associated with being wealthy and having access to extravagant experiences and possessions.

  • For example, someone might say, “Ever since he became a successful entrepreneur, he’s been living the high life.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s lavish vacations and expensive purchases, one might comment, “She’s definitely living the high life.”
  • A person might aspire to live the high life and say, “Someday, I’m going to be living the high life too.”

44. Money talks

The phrase “money talks” means that wealth and financial power have influence and can communicate or assert itself. It suggests that money can have a significant impact on decisions, actions, and opportunities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “In this industry, money talks and determines who gets ahead.”
  • In a discussion about the influence of wealth, one might comment, “Unfortunately, in our society, money talks.”
  • A person might emphasize the importance of financial resources and say, “Don’t underestimate the power of money talks.”

45. Big spender

A “big spender” is someone who spends a significant amount of money, often on luxurious or extravagant items or experiences. It implies a willingness to spend freely and without restraint.

  • For example, one might say, “She’s always the big spender when we go shopping.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s extravagant lifestyle, one might comment, “He’s definitely a big spender.”
  • A person might admire someone’s ability to spend freely and say, “I wish I could be a big spender like him.”

46. Money spinner

This term refers to a business or investment that generates a significant amount of money or profit.

  • For example, “His new tech startup is a real money spinner.”
  • A person discussing investment opportunities might say, “Real estate has always been a money spinner.”
  • In a conversation about successful entrepreneurs, someone might mention, “She turned her small business into a money spinner.”

47. Cash cow

A cash cow is a business, product, or investment that consistently generates a large amount of profit with minimal effort or investment.

  • For instance, “Their flagship product has become a real cash cow.”
  • In a discussion about passive income, someone might mention, “Real estate investments can be a cash cow.”
  • A person might say, “Investing in dividend stocks can create a cash cow for your portfolio.”

48. Money tree

This term refers to a situation or investment that is believed to generate money easily and effortlessly.

  • For example, “Many people believe that the stock market is a money tree.”
  • In a conversation about get-rich-quick schemes, someone might say, “Be careful of anyone promising a money tree.”
  • A person discussing a successful business might mention, “They’ve built a real money tree with their online store.”

49. Money pit

A money pit refers to a situation or investment that consistently requires a large amount of money or resources without providing a significant return.

  • For instance, “Their failing business has become a real money pit.”
  • In a discussion about home renovations, someone might say, “Be careful not to turn your house into a money pit.”
  • A person might mention, “Investing in a failing company can quickly become a money pit.”

50. Money magnet

A money magnet is a person, investment, or opportunity that is believed to attract wealth or money.

  • For example, “He’s known as a money magnet, always finding lucrative opportunities.”
  • In a conversation about successful entrepreneurs, someone might mention, “She has a natural talent for becoming a money magnet.”
  • A person discussing investment strategies might say, “Real estate can be a money magnet if you choose the right properties.”