Top 47 Slang For Marginalization – Meaning & Usage

Marginalization, unfortunately, is a reality for many individuals in our society. Understanding the slang terms related to marginalization can help shed light on these important issues and foster empathy and awareness. We’ve compiled a list of some of the most commonly used terms to help you navigate conversations surrounding this topic with sensitivity and understanding. Let’s dive in and explore the nuances of language in relation to marginalization.

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1. Invisible

This term refers to individuals or groups who are overlooked or not given attention or recognition. It can also describe the feeling of being unnoticed or unimportant.

  • For example, a person might say, “I feel invisible in this company because my ideas are never acknowledged.”
  • In a conversation about social issues, someone might comment, “The struggles of marginalized communities often go invisible in mainstream media.”
  • A person discussing their personal experiences might say, “Growing up, I felt invisible because my voice was constantly dismissed.”

2. Disregarded

This term describes the act of being dismissed or not given proper attention or consideration. It can also refer to feeling undervalued or unimportant.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I feel disregarded by my teacher because they never listen to my opinions.”
  • In a discussion about workplace dynamics, someone might comment, “Employees often feel disregarded when their ideas are not taken seriously by management.”
  • A person sharing their experiences might say, “As a member of a marginalized community, I often feel disregarded by society.”

3. Alienated

This term describes the experience of being pushed away or excluded from a group or community. It can also refer to feeling disconnected or estranged from others.

  • For example, a person might say, “I feel alienated from my family because they don’t understand or accept my identity.”
  • In a conversation about social dynamics, someone might comment, “Certain policies can alienate marginalized communities and perpetuate inequality.”
  • A person sharing their personal story might say, “Growing up, I felt alienated from my peers because I didn’t fit into societal norms.”

4. Marginalized

This term describes individuals or groups who are pushed to the fringes of society or who are treated as unimportant or insignificant. It can also refer to the systemic exclusion or oppression of certain communities.

  • For instance, a person might say, “People of color have been historically marginalized and denied equal opportunities.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might comment, “Recognizing the experiences of marginalized communities is crucial for creating a more inclusive society.”
  • A person sharing their experiences might say, “As a member of a marginalized group, I constantly face discrimination and marginalization in various aspects of my life.”

5. Disempowered

This term describes the state of feeling powerless or lacking control over one’s own life or circumstances. It can also refer to the systematic disempowerment of certain individuals or groups.

  • For example, a person might say, “The marginalized community has been disempowered for generations, and it’s time for change.”
  • In a conversation about social inequality, someone might comment, “Disempowerment is a result of systemic discrimination and unequal power structures.”
  • A person sharing their story might say, “Growing up in a disadvantaged neighborhood, I often felt disempowered and limited in my opportunities.”

6. Devalued

Devalued is a term used to describe individuals or groups who are considered to have less value or importance in society.

  • For example, a marginalized community might feel devalued due to the lack of resources and opportunities available to them.
  • In a workplace, someone might feel devalued if their ideas are consistently ignored or dismissed by their colleagues.
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I feel devalued because my contributions are constantly overlooked.”

7. Overlooked

Overlooked refers to individuals or groups who are not given proper attention or consideration.

  • For instance, a marginalized community might feel overlooked by the government when it comes to receiving necessary services and support.
  • In a meeting, someone might feel overlooked if their ideas are not acknowledged or taken into account.
  • A person might express their disappointment by saying, “I feel overlooked because my achievements are often attributed to others.”

8. Neglected

Neglected is a term used to describe individuals or groups who are not given the care or attention they need or deserve.

  • For example, a marginalized community might feel neglected by the healthcare system, resulting in inadequate access to medical services.
  • In a family, a child might feel neglected if their emotional needs are consistently ignored or disregarded.
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I feel neglected because my concerns are never taken seriously.”

9. Silenced

Silenced refers to individuals or groups who are intentionally or unintentionally prevented from speaking up or sharing their experiences.

  • For instance, a marginalized community might feel silenced when their voices are not represented in decision-making processes.
  • In a conversation, someone might feel silenced if their opinions are constantly interrupted or dismissed.
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I feel silenced because my perspective is constantly invalidated.”

10. Subjugated

Subjugated is a term used to describe individuals or groups who are subjected to control or domination by others.

  • For example, a marginalized community might feel subjugated by oppressive systems and institutions that limit their freedom and opportunities.
  • In a relationship, someone might feel subjugated if their partner constantly exerts power and control over them.
  • A person might express their resentment by saying, “I feel subjugated because my rights and autonomy are constantly violated.”

11. Discriminated against

This term refers to the act of treating someone unfairly or differently based on their race, gender, religion, or other characteristics. It often involves denying someone their rights or opportunities.

  • For example, “She felt discriminated against when she was passed over for a promotion because of her age.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might say, “Many people of color face discrimination on a daily basis.”
  • A news article might report, “The study found that LGBTQ individuals are often discriminated against in the workplace.”

12. Oppressed

This term describes the state of being kept down or controlled by a more powerful group or system. It often involves the denial of basic rights and freedoms.

  • For instance, “The oppressed people rose up against their oppressive government.”
  • In a conversation about historical movements, someone might mention, “The Civil Rights Movement fought against the oppression of Black Americans.”
  • A social media post might declare, “We must stand together to end the oppression of marginalized communities.”

13. Stigmatized

This term refers to the act of attaching a negative association or stereotype to a person or group. It often leads to the marginalization and exclusion of those who are stigmatized.

  • For example, “People with mental illnesses are often stigmatized and face discrimination.”
  • In a discussion about HIV/AIDS, someone might mention, “Stigmatizing those with HIV only perpetuates the spread of the disease.”
  • A news headline might read, “New campaign aims to reduce the stigma surrounding addiction.”

14. Pushed to the fringes

This phrase describes the act of placing individuals or groups on the outskirts or margins of society, often resulting in their exclusion or isolation.

  • For instance, “The homeless population is often pushed to the fringes of society.”
  • In a conversation about poverty, someone might say, “Those living in poverty are frequently pushed to the fringes and ignored.”
  • An article might discuss, “The impact of gentrification on marginalized communities, pushing them to the fringes of society.”

15. Displaced

This term refers to the act of being removed or forced to leave one’s home or community, often due to conflict, natural disasters, or other circumstances beyond one’s control.

  • For example, “The war in the region has displaced thousands of people.”
  • In a discussion about refugees, someone might mention, “Many refugees are displaced from their homes due to violence or persecution.”
  • A news report might state, “The hurricane has left many residents displaced and in need of assistance.”

16. Suppressed

This term refers to the act of deliberately preventing or restraining something or someone from being heard or known. It can also describe the systematic oppression or marginalization of a group or individual.

  • For example, “The government suppressed the protest by using force.”
  • In discussing social issues, one might say, “The voices of marginalized communities are often suppressed.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “My ideas were constantly suppressed in that workplace.”

17. Left out in the cold

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of being left behind or excluded from a group or situation. It can also convey a sense of being neglected or ignored.

  • For instance, “After the breakup, I felt like I was left out in the cold.”
  • In a discussion about team projects, one might say, “Some members were left out in the cold and not given any tasks.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I was always left out in the cold during family gatherings.”

18. Cast aside

This term refers to being ignored, discarded, or treated as unimportant or insignificant. It can also convey a sense of being rejected or abandoned.

  • For example, “After the new management took over, many employees felt cast aside.”
  • In discussing relationships, one might say, “I was cast aside by my partner without any explanation.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “My ideas were constantly cast aside during team meetings.”

19. Put on the fringes

This phrase describes the act of placing someone or something on the outskirts or periphery, often resulting in their exclusion or marginalization. It can also convey a sense of being pushed to the edges or being made to feel insignificant.

  • For instance, “Certain communities have been put on the fringes of society for generations.”
  • In a discussion about politics, one might say, “Progressive policies are often put on the fringes of mainstream debates.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “As a minority, I feel constantly put on the fringes of society.”

20. Ignored

This term refers to being deliberately overlooked or not given attention. It can also convey a sense of being disregarded or not taken seriously.

  • For example, “My suggestions were constantly ignored during the meeting.”
  • In discussing social dynamics, one might say, “Certain voices are often ignored in conversations about privilege.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I feel ignored by my friends when I try to discuss important issues.”

21. Unheard

This term refers to individuals or groups whose voices or opinions are disregarded or overlooked. It signifies a lack of attention or consideration given to their perspectives.

  • For example, “The marginalized communities often feel unheard in discussions about social issues.”
  • A person might say, “I feel unheard in my workplace when I try to voice my concerns.”
  • In a conversation about diversity, someone might mention, “It’s important to create spaces where everyone feels heard and valued.”

22. Shunned

This term describes the act of deliberately excluding or ostracizing someone from a group or community. It implies a social rejection or avoidance due to factors such as race, religion, or other forms of identity.

  • For instance, “She was shunned by her peers because of her unconventional lifestyle.”
  • In a discussion about bullying, one might say, “Many LGBTQ+ youth experience being shunned by their classmates.”
  • A person sharing their experience might mention, “I was shunned by my family when I decided to pursue a career in the arts.”

23. Dispossessed

This term refers to individuals or groups who have been stripped of their belongings, property, or fundamental rights. It signifies a state of being without resources or power.

  • For example, “The dispossessed refugees had to leave their homes and belongings behind.”
  • In a conversation about social inequality, one might say, “The dispossessed are often trapped in a cycle of poverty.”
  • A person discussing historical injustices might mention, “The dispossessed indigenous communities continue to fight for their land rights.”

24. Underrepresented

This term describes a lack of proportional or fair representation of a particular group or community. It signifies an imbalance or disparity in the visibility and inclusion of diverse perspectives.

  • For instance, “Women are often underrepresented in leadership positions.”
  • In a discussion about media representation, someone might say, “People of color are underrepresented in mainstream movies and TV shows.”
  • A person advocating for diversity might mention, “We need to ensure that marginalized groups are not underrepresented in decision-making processes.”

25. Exclusion

This term refers to the deliberate act of preventing someone or something from being included or participating in a particular group or activity. It signifies a form of marginalization and denies equal opportunities.

  • For example, “The exclusion of certain students from extracurricular activities perpetuates inequality.”
  • In a conversation about workplace diversity, one might say, “Exclusion based on race or gender is a systemic issue.”
  • A person discussing social dynamics might mention, “Cliques in high school often rely on exclusion to maintain their popularity.”

26. Alienation

Alienation refers to the feeling of being isolated or excluded from a group or society. It can occur when someone feels different or disconnected from others.

  • For instance, a teenager might experience alienation if they don’t fit in with their peers.
  • In a workplace, an employee might feel alienation if they are constantly left out of team activities.
  • A person might express their feelings of alienation by saying, “I always feel like I’m on the outside looking in.”

27. Disenfranchisement

Disenfranchisement refers to the deprivation or denial of certain rights, particularly the right to vote or participate in the political process. It often occurs as a result of discrimination or marginalization.

  • For example, historically, marginalized groups such as women and African Americans have faced disenfranchisement in the United States.
  • A person might discuss the issue of voter disenfranchisement by saying, “It’s important to fight against any attempts to disenfranchise certain communities.”
  • A news article might highlight a case of disenfranchisement with the headline, “New Voter ID Laws Lead to Disenfranchisement of Minority Voters.”

28. Segregation

Segregation refers to the enforced separation of different racial, ethnic, or social groups, often by law or social norms. It involves the restriction or denial of access to resources, opportunities, or public spaces based on one’s identity.

  • For instance, the Jim Crow laws in the United States enforced racial segregation.
  • A person might discuss the impact of segregation by saying, “Segregation perpetuates inequality and limits opportunities for marginalized communities.”
  • A news article might report on efforts to combat segregation with the headline, “Community Leaders Call for an End to School Segregation.”

29. Discrimination

Discrimination refers to the unjust or prejudicial treatment of individuals or groups based on their perceived differences, such as race, gender, religion, or sexual orientation. It involves the denial of equal rights and opportunities.

  • For example, a person might face discrimination when applying for a job due to their ethnicity.
  • A person might share their personal experience of discrimination by saying, “I’ve faced discrimination throughout my life simply because of who I am.”
  • A news article might discuss a recent case of discrimination with the headline, “Lawsuit Alleges Workplace Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation.”

30. Ostracism

Ostracism refers to the act of excluding or ignoring someone, often as a form of punishment or rejection. It involves intentionally isolating an individual or group from social interactions or relationships.

  • For instance, a student might experience ostracism if they are consistently ignored or excluded by their classmates.
  • A person might express their feelings of ostracism by saying, “I feel like I’m invisible to everyone around me.”
  • A news article might highlight the negative effects of ostracism with the headline, “Study Finds Ostracism Leads to Increased Mental Health Issues.”

31. Stigmatization

Stigmatization refers to the act of labeling and discriminating against individuals or groups based on certain characteristics or traits. It involves attaching negative stereotypes and treating them as outcasts.

  • For example, a person might be stigmatized for their mental health condition, leading to discrimination and isolation.
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “Stigmatization of certain communities prevents them from accessing proper healthcare.”
  • A person might share their personal experience by saying, “I faced stigmatization when I came out as transgender, but I found a supportive community that accepted me for who I am.”

32. Marginalization

Marginalization refers to the process of excluding individuals or groups from mainstream society, often resulting in their oppression and lack of access to resources and opportunities.

  • For instance, marginalized communities might have limited access to education or healthcare.
  • In a conversation about social justice, someone might argue, “Marginalization perpetuates inequality and hinders progress.”
  • A person might share their perspective by saying, “As a member of a marginalized group, I constantly face barriers and discrimination.”

33. Social exclusion

Social exclusion refers to the act of isolating individuals or groups from participating fully in social and community life. It involves denying them access to resources, services, and opportunities.

  • For example, someone experiencing social exclusion might be denied employment or housing.
  • In a discussion about poverty, someone might say, “Social exclusion traps individuals in a cycle of disadvantage.”
  • A person might share their personal story by saying, “I grew up in social exclusion, and it took years to break free from the cycle.”

34. Cast out

To cast out means to be ostracized and rejected by a community or group, often resulting in isolation and exclusion from social interactions and support systems.

  • For instance, someone might be cast out from their family for marrying outside their religion.
  • In a conversation about bullying, someone might say, “No one deserves to be cast out and left feeling alone.”
  • A person might share their experience by saying, “I felt cast out when my friends turned against me for expressing my true self.”

35. Shut out

Shut out refers to the act of excluding and denying someone access to a group or opportunity, often resulting in feelings of isolation and being left out.

  • For example, a person might be shut out from a job opportunity due to discrimination.
  • In a discussion about inclusivity, someone might argue, “We need to ensure that no one is shut out based on their background or identity.”
  • A person might share their perspective by saying, “Being shut out from social events made me realize the importance of creating inclusive spaces.”

36. Pushed aside

This term refers to being overlooked or excluded in a situation or group. It implies that someone or something is not given the attention or consideration they deserve.

  • For example, a person might feel pushed aside in a meeting when their ideas are not acknowledged.
  • In a group project, a team member might complain, “I feel like my contributions are always pushed aside.”
  • A marginalized community might express their frustration by saying, “Our voices are constantly pushed aside in discussions about policy.”

37. Overpowered

This term describes a situation where someone or something is overwhelmed or dominated by a stronger force. It can refer to individuals, groups, or even ideas.

  • For instance, a person might feel overpowered by their workload, stating, “I’m completely overpowered by all these tasks.”
  • In a sports game, a team might feel overpowered by their opponents, saying, “We were completely overpowered on the field.”
  • A marginalized group might express their struggle by saying, “Our community is constantly overpowered by systemic discrimination.”

38. Oppression

Oppression refers to the systemic mistreatment or control of a group of people based on their race, gender, class, or other characteristics. It involves the use of power and authority to deny certain rights and privileges to marginalized individuals.

  • For example, a person might speak out against oppression, saying, “We need to fight against the oppression of marginalized communities.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might say, “Oppression is deeply rooted in our society and needs to be dismantled.”
  • A marginalized individual might share their experiences, stating, “I have personally faced oppression throughout my life.”

39. Subjugation

Subjugation refers to the act of forcing someone or a group of people into submission or control. It involves the use of power and authority to oppress and dominate others.

  • For instance, a person might discuss historical subjugation, saying, “The colonization of indigenous peoples involved the subjugation of their cultures.”
  • In a conversation about power dynamics, someone might argue, “Subjugation is a tool used by those in power to maintain control.”
  • A marginalized community might express their resistance to subjugation by saying, “We will not tolerate further subjugation. We demand equality and justice.”

40. Disadvantage

Disadvantage refers to being in an unfavorable or unequal position compared to others. It implies a lack of opportunities, resources, or privileges that others may have.

  • For example, a person might discuss the disadvantages of growing up in poverty, stating, “Children from low-income families face multiple disadvantages.”
  • In a conversation about systemic barriers, someone might say, “Marginalized communities are often at a significant disadvantage in accessing healthcare.”
  • A marginalized individual might share their experiences, stating, “I have faced numerous disadvantages throughout my life due to my identity.”

41. Prejudice

Prejudice refers to preconceived opinions or attitudes towards a person or group, usually based on stereotypes or limited information. It involves making judgments without proper knowledge or understanding.

  • For example, someone might say, “His prejudice against immigrants is evident in his discriminatory comments.”
  • In a discussion about racism, one might argue, “Prejudice is a result of ignorance and fear.”
  • A person might reflect, “It’s important to challenge our own prejudices and strive for empathy and understanding.”

42. Inequality

Inequality refers to a lack of fairness or equal opportunities in society. It involves the unequal distribution of resources, power, and privileges based on factors such as race, gender, or socioeconomic status.

  • For instance, one might say, “The growing income inequality is a pressing issue in our society.”
  • In a discussion about gender inequality, someone might argue, “Gender inequality persists in many industries, with women facing lower pay and limited leadership positions.”
  • A person might reflect, “Addressing inequality requires systemic changes and a commitment to social justice.”

43. Injustice

Injustice refers to a lack of fairness or violation of rights. It involves actions or situations that are morally or ethically wrong, often resulting in harm or disadvantage for individuals or groups.

  • For example, someone might say, “The wrongful conviction of an innocent person is a grave injustice.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, one might argue, “We must work towards a society that is free from injustice and discrimination.”
  • A person might reflect, “Recognizing and addressing injustice is essential for creating a more equitable world.”

44. Dehumanization

Dehumanization refers to the process of treating individuals or groups as less than human. It involves denying their rights, dignity, and humanity, often leading to marginalization and abuse.

  • For instance, one might say, “The dehumanization of refugees is a tragic consequence of xenophobia.”
  • In a discussion about historical atrocities, someone might argue, “Dehumanization played a central role in the Holocaust, enabling mass violence and genocide.”
  • A person might reflect, “We must actively challenge dehumanizing language and attitudes to promote empathy and equality.”

45. Misrepresentation

Misrepresentation refers to presenting something or someone in a misleading or inaccurate way. It involves distorting information or omitting crucial details, often leading to misunderstandings or negative perceptions.

  • For example, someone might say, “The media’s misrepresentation of marginalized communities perpetuates stereotypes.”
  • In a discussion about identity, one might argue, “Misrepresentation erases the experiences and diversity within marginalized groups.”
  • A person might reflect, “We must strive for accurate representation and challenge misrepresentations that perpetuate discrimination and exclusion.”

46. Underprivileged

This term refers to individuals or groups who lack the social, economic, or educational advantages enjoyed by others in society. It often implies a lack of access to resources and opportunities.

  • For example, a social worker might say, “We need to address the needs of underprivileged communities.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might argue, “Equal access to quality education is crucial for leveling the playing field for underprivileged students.”
  • A news article might highlight, “The underprivileged population is disproportionately affected by poverty and unemployment.”

47. Devaluation

This term refers to the act of reducing the value or worth of something or someone. In the context of marginalization, it often refers to the devaluing of certain individuals or groups based on their race, gender, socioeconomic status, or other factors.

  • For instance, a sociologist might study the devaluation of unpaid domestic labor, noting, “The devaluation of housework perpetuates gender inequality.”
  • In a discussion about systemic racism, someone might argue, “The devaluation of Black lives is evident in the disparities in healthcare, education, and criminal justice.”
  • A news article might report, “The devaluation of immigrant workers leads to exploitation and unfair labor practices.”
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