Top 68 Slang For Unfortunate – Meaning & Usage

Life can throw us some curveballs, and when things take a turn for the unfortunate, it’s good to have the right words to describe it. Whether it’s a minor mishap or a major setback, our team at Fluentslang has got you covered with a list of slang terms for unfortunate situations that will have you nodding in agreement and maybe even chuckling at the relatability. So, buckle up and get ready to dive into this listicle that’s sure to hit close to home for many of us.

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1. Bummer

This term is used to describe a situation that is disappointing or unfortunate.

  • For example, “It’s such a bummer that the concert got canceled.”
  • Someone might say, “I had a bummer of a day, everything went wrong.”
  • Another might comment, “It’s a real bummer that I didn’t get the job I wanted.”

2. Tough break

This phrase is used to express sympathy or empathy for someone who has experienced an unfortunate circumstance.

  • For instance, “That’s a tough break, losing your wallet right before your trip.”
  • Someone might say, “I heard you didn’t get the promotion, tough break.”
  • Another might comment, “You had a tough break with that car accident, hope you’re okay.”

3. Sucks

This word is used to describe something that is unfortunate or disappointing.

  • For example, “It sucks that we have to work late tonight.”
  • Someone might say, “My car broke down, it really sucks.”
  • Another might comment, “It sucks that I missed the train and now I’m late for my meeting.”

4. Rough

This word is used to describe a situation that is difficult or unpleasant.

  • For instance, “It was a rough day at work, nothing went right.”
  • Someone might say, “He’s going through a rough patch in his life right now.”
  • Another might comment, “Getting caught in the rain without an umbrella was a rough experience.”

5. Hard luck

This phrase is used to describe a series of unfortunate circumstances or bad luck.

  • For example, “He’s had a string of hard luck lately, everything seems to go wrong for him.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve had some hard luck with finding a job, it’s been tough.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s had a lot of hard luck in her relationships, it’s been a rough journey.”

6. That’s rough

This phrase is used to express sympathy or understanding towards someone who is going through a tough or unlucky situation.

  • For example, if someone tells you they just lost their job, you might respond, “Oh, man. That’s rough.”
  • If a friend shares that they failed an important exam, you could say, “I’m sorry to hear that. That’s rough.”
  • When someone describes a challenging experience, you might reply, “Wow, that sounds really rough.”

7. Unlucky

This term is used to describe someone who frequently experiences unfortunate events or outcomes.

  • For instance, if a person misses their bus and then spills coffee on themselves, you might say, “You’re so unlucky.”
  • If someone tells you they lost their wallet for the third time this month, you could respond, “You’re definitely having an unlucky streak.”
  • When a friend shares a story of their car breaking down on the way to an important meeting, you might comment, “That’s really unlucky.”

8. Unfortunate

This word is used to describe events or situations that are not favorable or bring negative consequences.

  • For example, if someone tells you they couldn’t attend a party due to a family emergency, you might respond, “That’s unfortunate.”
  • If a friend shares that they were unable to secure a job offer after multiple interviews, you could say, “That’s really unfortunate.”
  • When someone describes a series of unfortunate events, you might comment, “It sounds like you’ve had a string of unfortunate occurrences.”

9. Bad break

This phrase is used to describe a situation where someone experiences a stroke of bad luck or an unfortunate outcome.

  • For instance, if a person injures themselves right before a big sports competition, you might say, “That’s a bad break.”
  • If someone tells you they missed out on a job opportunity due to a misunderstanding, you could respond, “That’s definitely a bad break.”
  • When a friend shares a story of losing their phone just before an important business call, you might comment, “That’s such a bad break.”

10. Not cool

This phrase is used to express disapproval or disappointment towards a situation or action.

  • For example, if someone cancels plans last minute, you might say, “Not cool, man.”
  • If a friend shares that they were cheated on by their partner, you could respond, “That’s really not cool.”
  • When someone describes being treated unfairly by a colleague, you might comment, “That’s not cool at all.”

11. Womp womp

This phrase is used to express disappointment or sympathy for an unfortunate situation or outcome.

  • For example, if someone fails a test, you might say, “Womp womp, better luck next time.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might respond, “Womp womp, that’s a bummer.”
  • If someone tells a story about a failed attempt at something, you could say, “Womp womp, tough break.”

12. That’s unfortunate

This phrase is a straightforward expression of sympathy or acknowledgement of an unfortunate event or circumstance.

  • For instance, if someone shares bad news, you might respond, “That’s unfortunate, I’m sorry to hear that.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing outcome, someone might say, “That’s unfortunate, but we’ll learn from it.”
  • If someone tells a story of a mishap, you could comment, “That’s unfortunate, hope things get better.”

13. That stinks

This phrase is used to express disappointment or frustration about an unfortunate situation or outcome.

  • For example, if someone cancels plans at the last minute, you might say, “That stinks, I was looking forward to it.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might respond, “That stinks, but there will be other chances.”
  • If someone tells a story about a series of unfortunate events, you could say, “That stinks, hope things turn around.”

14. Oh, shoot

This phrase is a mild exclamation of disappointment or frustration in response to an unfortunate event or mistake.

  • For instance, if someone drops something and it breaks, you might say, “Oh, shoot, that was expensive.”
  • In a discussion about a missed opportunity, someone might say, “Oh, shoot, I wish I had known about it sooner.”
  • If someone tells a story about a minor mishap, you could respond, “Oh, shoot, that’s too bad.”

15. Cursed

This term refers to being jinxed or consistently experiencing bad luck or unfortunate events.

  • For example, if someone always seems to have car trouble, you might say, “They’re cursed when it comes to vehicles.”
  • In a conversation about a string of unfortunate incidents, someone might comment, “I feel cursed lately, nothing seems to go right.”
  • If someone tells a story about a series of unlucky events, you could say, “That sounds like a cursed situation.”

16. Jinxed

To be jinxed means to be under a spell of bad luck or misfortune. It is often used to describe someone who seems to have a streak of bad luck.

  • For example, “I must be jinxed, every time I go on vacation it rains.”
  • If someone spills their coffee and then drops their phone, they might say, “I’m so jinxed today.”
  • A person might comment on a friend’s bad luck by saying, “You’re jinxed, everything always goes wrong for you.”

17. Murphy’s Law

Murphy’s Law is a humorous adage that states that if something has the potential to go wrong, it will inevitably go wrong at the worst possible time.

  • For instance, if someone is running late and encounters every red light on their way, they might say, “It’s Murphy’s Law.”
  • If a person’s computer crashes right before a deadline, they might exclaim, “Of course, Murphy’s Law strikes again!”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Be prepared for Murphy’s Law to kick in during your road trip.”

18. Rough luck

To have rough luck means to experience a series of unfortunate events or circumstances. It implies a string of bad luck or unfavorable outcomes.

  • For example, if someone loses their job and then their car breaks down, they might say, “I’ve had rough luck lately.”
  • If a person is consistently unsuccessful in their endeavors, they might attribute it to rough luck.
  • A person might sympathize with a friend’s misfortune by saying, “Sorry to hear about your rough luck, things will get better.”

19. Hard cheese

Hard cheese is a slang term used to express sympathy towards someone’s misfortune or bad luck. It is often used in a lighthearted or sarcastic manner.

  • For instance, if someone misses out on a promotion, a coworker might say, “Hard cheese, better luck next time.”
  • If a person’s favorite sports team loses, their friend might tease them by saying, “Hard cheese, your team couldn’t catch a break.”
  • A person might respond to their own bad luck by saying, “Well, hard cheese for me, I guess.”

20. Misfortune

Misfortune refers to a series of unlucky or unfortunate events that happen to someone. It can range from minor inconveniences to major setbacks.

  • For example, if someone’s flight gets canceled and their luggage gets lost, they might say, “I’ve had a string of misfortune.”
  • If a person consistently encounters problems or obstacles, they might attribute it to misfortune.
  • A person might sympathize with a friend’s bad luck by saying, “I’m sorry to hear about your misfortune, things will turn around.”

21. Hard times

This phrase refers to a period of adversity or hardship that someone is going through.

  • For example, “I lost my job and my car broke down. I’m going through some hard times right now.”
  • A person might say, “He’s been going through hard times since his divorce.”
  • In a conversation about financial struggles, someone might say, “Many people are experiencing hard times due to the current economic situation.”

22. Down on your luck

This expression describes a situation where someone is experiencing a streak of bad luck or unfortunate events.

  • For instance, “I’ve been down on my luck lately. Everything seems to be going wrong.”
  • A person might say, “He’s been down on his luck ever since he lost his job.”
  • In a discussion about gambling, someone might say, “I’ve been down on my luck at the casino lately. I can’t seem to win anything.”

23. Unlucky break

This phrase is used to describe an unfortunate or unlucky situation or event that occurs.

  • For example, “She had an unlucky break when her car broke down on the way to the job interview.”
  • A person might say, “I had an unlucky break when I missed the last train home.”
  • In a conversation about sports, someone might say, “The team had an unlucky break when their star player got injured.”

24. Crummy

This word is used to describe something that is of poor quality, unpleasant, or unfortunate.

  • For instance, “I had a crummy day at work. Everything went wrong.”
  • A person might say, “He’s stuck in a crummy job that he hates.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing experience, someone might say, “The movie was crummy. I wouldn’t recommend it.”

25. Rotten luck

This phrase is used to describe a situation where someone has extremely bad luck or is consistently experiencing unfortunate events.

  • For example, “He has been having rotten luck with his investments. Everything he touches seems to fail.”
  • A person might say, “I had rotten luck with my flights. They were all delayed or canceled.”
  • In a conversation about a series of unfortunate events, someone might say, “She’s had rotten luck with relationships. Every guy she dates turns out to be a jerk.”

26. Hard knock

This term refers to a challenging or unfortunate situation that someone has experienced.

  • For example, “He grew up in a tough neighborhood and had a lot of hard knocks.”
  • In a discussion about overcoming adversity, someone might say, “Life has dealt me some hard knocks, but I’ve learned to keep pushing forward.”
  • Another person might comment, “Getting laid off was a hard knock, but it ended up leading me to a better job.”

27. Dismal

This word describes something that is extremely unfortunate or bleak.

  • For instance, “The team’s performance was dismal, and they lost the game by a landslide.”
  • In a conversation about the weather, someone might say, “The forecast for the weekend looks dismal with non-stop rain.”
  • A person discussing a disappointing event might say, “The turnout for the event was dismal, and we didn’t meet our fundraising goal.”

28. Grim

Grim is used to describe a situation that is unfortunate, serious, and often with a sense of impending doom.

  • For example, “The news of the accident was grim, with multiple fatalities.”
  • In a discussion about the economy, someone might say, “The job market looks grim with rising unemployment rates.”
  • A person describing a difficult decision might say, “It was a grim choice, but I had to prioritize my family’s well-being.”

29. Woeful

Woeful describes something that is deeply unfortunate and causes sadness or distress.

  • For instance, “The team’s performance was woeful, and their fans were disappointed.”
  • In a conversation about personal experiences, someone might say, “I had a woeful time during my vacation due to constant rain.”
  • A person discussing a tragic event might comment, “The news of the accident was woeful, and it affected the entire community.”

30. Hexed

This slang term refers to someone or something that is believed to be under a curse or experiencing a string of bad luck.

  • For example, “Ever since she broke that mirror, she’s been hexed with one misfortune after another.”
  • In a discussion about superstitions, someone might say, “Walking under a ladder is believed to bring bad luck and make you hexed.”
  • A person describing a streak of unfortunate events might say, “I feel like I’m hexed lately, nothing seems to go right for me.”

31. Snakebit

This term is used to describe someone or something that seems to have a streak of bad luck. It can refer to a person who constantly experiences unfortunate events or a situation that is doomed to fail.

  • For example, “Ever since he lost his job, he’s been snakebit and can’t seem to catch a break.”
  • A sports fan might say, “Our team is snakebit this season with all the injuries.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’m feeling snakebit today – everything that could go wrong has gone wrong.”

32. Star-crossed

This phrase is often used to describe a couple or individuals whose relationship or circumstances are doomed from the start due to external forces or circumstances beyond their control.

  • For instance, “Romeo and Juliet are a classic example of star-crossed lovers.”
  • In a discussion about tragic love stories, one might say, “Their love was star-crossed, destined for heartbreak.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe their own situation, saying, “I feel like I’m in a star-crossed relationship – we can never seem to make it work.”

33. Ill-fated

This term describes something or someone that is destined to have an unfortunate or unsuccessful outcome. It implies a sense of inevitability and bad luck.

  • For example, “Their ill-fated business venture ended in bankruptcy.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, one might say, “The ill-fated expedition resulted in the loss of many lives.”
  • A person reflecting on their own life might comment, “I seem to have a string of ill-fated relationships.”

34. Doomed

This word indicates that something or someone is bound to experience a negative outcome or failure. It suggests a lack of hope or possibility for success.

  • For instance, “Their relationship was doomed from the start.”
  • In a discussion about a failing project, one might say, “It’s clear that the project is doomed.”
  • A person might express their pessimism by saying, “I feel like I’m doomed to be single forever.”

35. Fated

This term suggests that something is predetermined or destined to happen in a particular way. It implies that events or outcomes are beyond one’s control.

  • For example, “Their fated meeting changed the course of their lives.”
  • In a discussion about coincidences, one might say, “It was fated that they would cross paths.”
  • A person reflecting on their own life might comment, “I believe in fate – everything happens for a reason.”

36. Ill-starred

This term refers to someone or something that is destined for bad luck or unfortunate circumstances. It implies that the person or situation is marked by bad omens or a lack of luck.

  • For example, “He had an ill-starred career in the music industry, with multiple failed albums.”
  • In a discussion about unlucky events, someone might say, “It seems like every decision I make is ill-starred.”
  • A person describing a series of unfortunate events might say, “I feel like I’m living an ill-starred life.”

37. Damned

This slang term refers to being in a state of extreme misfortune or being doomed to a negative outcome. It implies a sense of hopelessness or inevitability.

  • For instance, “He was damned from the start, with no chance of success.”
  • In a discussion about bad luck, someone might say, “I feel like I’m damned no matter what I do.”
  • A person describing a string of unfortunate events might say, “It’s like I’m cursed or damned to have bad luck.”

38. Unlucky in love

This phrase is used to describe someone who has a history of bad luck or unfortunate experiences in their love life. It implies a lack of success or happiness in romantic relationships.

  • For example, “She’s always been unlucky in love, with a string of failed relationships.”
  • In a discussion about dating, someone might say, “I feel like I’m always unlucky in love.”
  • A person describing their romantic history might say, “I’ve had a long streak of being unlucky in love.”

39. Unlucky at cards

This saying refers to someone who consistently has bad luck or unfortunate outcomes when playing card games or participating in gambling activities. It implies a lack of skill or success in these endeavors.

  • For instance, “He’s always been unlucky at cards, constantly losing in poker games.”
  • In a discussion about gambling, someone might say, “I’m always unlucky at cards, no matter how hard I try.”
  • A person describing their experiences with card games might say, “I’ve come to accept that I’m just unlucky at cards.”

40. Unlucky at life

This phrase is used to describe someone who seems to have a constant streak of bad luck or unfortunate events in their life overall. It implies a lack of success or happiness in various aspects of life.

  • For example, “He’s always been unlucky at life, facing one setback after another.”
  • In a discussion about personal experiences, someone might say, “I feel like I’m always unlucky at life.”
  • A person describing their general circumstances might say, “I’ve had a string of unfortunate events and consider myself unlucky at life.”

41. Unlucky day

Refers to a day that is filled with misfortune or bad luck. It is often used to describe a day where everything seems to go wrong.

  • For example, “Today is such an unlucky day. I missed my bus, spilled coffee on my shirt, and lost my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I had the most unlucky day yesterday. I got a flat tire, lost my phone, and got a parking ticket.”
  • Another might complain, “I can’t catch a break. Every day feels like an unlucky day.”

42. Unlucky year

Refers to a year that is marked by a series of unfortunate events or bad luck. It is often used to describe a year where nothing seems to go right.

  • For instance, “2020 was such an unlucky year. It was filled with natural disasters, a pandemic, and economic downturn.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t wait for this unlucky year to be over. It feels like everything is going wrong.”
  • Another might comment, “I’ve had such an unlucky year. I lost my job, went through a breakup, and had multiple health issues.”

43. Unlucky star

Refers to a person who seems to attract bad luck or misfortune. It is often used to describe someone who always finds themselves in unfortunate situations.

  • For example, “I’m such an unlucky star. I always end up in the wrong place at the wrong time.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t invite him to the party. He’s an unlucky star and something bad always happens when he’s around.”
  • Another might comment, “I feel like I have an unlucky star following me. I can’t seem to catch a break.”

44. Unlucky charm

Refers to an object or item that is believed to bring bad luck or misfortune to its owner. It is often used to describe something that is supposed to bring luck but instead brings the opposite.

  • For instance, “That rabbit’s foot keychain turned out to be an unlucky charm. I lost my keys the day I started using it.”
  • Someone might say, “I don’t want that necklace. It’s an unlucky charm and I don’t need any more bad luck.”
  • Another might comment, “I threw away that lucky penny. It turned into an unlucky charm and everything went wrong after I found it.”

45. Unlucky number

Refers to a number that is believed to bring bad luck or misfortune. It is often used to describe a number that is considered unlucky or associated with negative events.

  • For example, “I always avoid the number 13. It’s an unlucky number and I don’t want anything bad to happen.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe I got assigned the unlucky number in the lottery. I never win with that number.”
  • Another might comment, “I had an unlucky number on my exam. I knew it was a bad sign and ended up failing.”

46. Unlucky accident

This refers to an unfortunate event or incident that occurs by chance or without intention. It implies that the accident was unlucky or unlucky in nature.

  • For example, “He slipped and fell on the ice, it was an unlucky accident.”
  • In a conversation about car crashes, someone might say, “It was just an unlucky accident, no one could have predicted it.”
  • A person might describe a series of unfortunate events by saying, “It seems like I’ve been having one unlucky accident after another.”

47. Unlucky incident

This is a term used to describe an unfortunate or unlucky incident or event. It implies that the incident was unexpected or undesired.

  • For instance, “The fire at the factory was an unlucky incident.”
  • In a discussion about workplace accidents, someone might say, “We need to take measures to prevent such unlucky incidents.”
  • A person might recount a series of unfortunate events by saying, “First, there was the car accident, then the unlucky incident at work.”

48. Unlucky situation

This refers to a situation or circumstance that is unfortunate or unlucky. It implies that the situation is difficult or challenging.

  • For example, “Losing my job was an unlucky situation.”
  • In a conversation about financial struggles, someone might say, “I’m going through a period of hard luck.”
  • A person might describe a series of unfortunate events by saying, “I seem to be stuck in one unlucky situation after another.”

49. Unlucky outcome

This is a term used to describe a result or consequence that is unlucky or unfortunate. It implies that the outcome was not what was desired or expected.

  • For instance, “The team’s loss was an unlucky outcome.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might say, “The unlucky outcome was a disappointment for everyone.”
  • A person might recount a series of unfortunate events by saying, “Each decision led to an unlucky outcome.”

50. Unlucky event

This refers to an event or occurrence that is unlucky or unfortunate. It implies that the event was unexpected or not desired.

  • For example, “The storm was an unlucky event.”
  • In a conversation about travel mishaps, someone might say, “Getting stranded at the airport was a misadventure.”
  • A person might describe a series of unfortunate events by saying, “It feels like every trip is filled with one unlucky event after another.”

51. Wretched

This word is used to describe something that is extremely unfortunate or unpleasant. It can refer to a person, a situation, or an event.

  • For example, “I had a wretched day at work, everything went wrong.”
  • Another usage could be, “The weather was wretched, it rained all day.”
  • Someone might say, “I felt wretched after hearing the news of the accident.”

52. Tough situation

This phrase is used to describe a situation that is hard to deal with or navigate. It implies that there are obstacles or complications involved.

  • For instance, “I’m in a tough situation right now, I don’t know what to do.”
  • A person might say, “She’s going through a tough situation, let’s offer her support.”
  • Another example could be, “Finding a job in this economy is a tough situation.”

53. Regrettable

This word is used to express disappointment or sadness about a situation. It implies that something could have been different or better.

  • For example, “It’s regrettable that we couldn’t attend the wedding.”
  • Someone might say, “The cancellation of the event was regrettable for all the participants.”
  • Another usage could be, “The outcome of the game was regrettable, we lost in the last minute.”

54. Gloomy

This word is used to describe a situation or atmosphere that is dark, depressing, or without hope. It can refer to the weather, a person’s mood, or a general feeling of sadness.

  • For instance, “The gloomy weather matched my mood.”
  • A person might say, “The news of the layoffs cast a gloomy shadow over the office.”
  • Another example could be, “He had a gloomy outlook on life after the breakup.”

55. Desolate

This word is used to describe a place or situation that is empty, deserted, or without signs of life. It can convey a sense of loneliness or sadness.

  • For example, “The desolate street gave me an eerie feeling.”
  • Someone might say, “The desolate landscape stretched for miles, there was no sign of civilization.”
  • Another usage could be, “The abandoned house looked desolate, with broken windows and overgrown weeds.”

56. Miserable

This term is used to describe a state of extreme unhappiness or discomfort.

  • For example, “I had a miserable day at work.”
  • Someone might say, “I feel miserable after the breakup.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing event, a person might comment, “That movie was absolutely miserable.”

57. Rough patch

This phrase is used to describe a period of time when things are not going well or when there are many challenges.

  • For instance, “I’m going through a rough patch in my relationship.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been having a rough patch at work lately.”
  • In a discussion about a struggling business, someone might comment, “The company is going through a rough patch.”

58. Gutted

This term is used to describe a feeling of being devastated or deeply disappointed.

  • For example, “I was absolutely gutted when I didn’t get the job.”
  • A person might say, “I feel gutted after losing the game.”
  • In a conversation about a failed opportunity, someone might comment, “I’m gutted that I missed out on that chance.”

59. Doom and gloom

This phrase is used to describe a feeling of pessimism or negativity, often associated with a belief that things will not turn out well.

  • For instance, “There’s a lot of doom and gloom in the news lately.”
  • A person might say, “I try to stay positive, but sometimes the doom and gloom gets to me.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult situation, someone might comment, “It’s hard to stay optimistic when it’s all doom and gloom.”

60. Sorrowful

This term is used to describe a feeling or expression of sadness.

  • For example, “She had a sorrowful look on her face.”
  • A person might say, “I feel sorrowful for their loss.”
  • In a conversation about a tragic event, someone might comment, “It’s a sorrowful situation.”

61. Adverse

This term refers to something that is unfavorable or harmful. It is often used to describe a situation or condition that is unfortunate or undesirable.

  • For example, “The adverse weather conditions caused the event to be canceled.”
  • In a discussion about the effects of a medication, someone might say, “Some patients experienced adverse reactions.”
  • A person might describe a difficult situation as, “I faced some adverse circumstances that made it hard to succeed.”

62. Woebegone

This term describes someone who is sorrowful or sad, often due to unfortunate circumstances. It can also be used to describe something that looks or appears sad or pitiful.

  • For instance, “She had a woebegone expression after receiving the bad news.”
  • In a discussion about a dilapidated building, someone might say, “The old house had a woebegone appearance.”
  • A person might describe their feelings as, “I felt woebegone after the breakup.”

63. Hard-luck story

This phrase refers to a story or account of someone’s misfortunes or bad luck. It is often used to describe a person who has faced a series of unfortunate events or circumstances.

  • For example, “He shared his hard-luck story of growing up in poverty.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s difficult life, a person might say, “She has quite a hard-luck story.”
  • A person might describe a movie or book as, “It’s a hard-luck story that tugs at your heartstrings.”

64. Tragic

This term describes something that is heartbreaking, disastrous, or causing great sadness. It is often used to describe events, situations, or outcomes that are extremely unfortunate.

  • For instance, “The car accident was a tragic event that claimed several lives.”
  • In a discussion about a failed mission, someone might say, “It was a tragic outcome.”
  • A person might describe a loss or death as, “It’s a tragic loss for the community.”

65. Pitiful

This term describes something or someone that is sad, pathetic, or deserving of pity. It is often used to express sympathy or disdain for someone’s unfortunate circumstances.

  • For example, “His pitiful attempt at singing made everyone cringe.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s behavior, a person might say, “It’s pitiful how they treat others.”
  • A person might describe a situation as, “It’s a pitiful state of affairs.”

66. Plagued

To be plagued means to be constantly troubled or affected by something negative. It implies a sense of being cursed or burdened by unfortunate circumstances.

  • For example, “He has been plagued by bad luck his whole life.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team’s struggles, someone might say, “The team has been plagued by injuries this season.”
  • A person might describe their ongoing health issues by saying, “I’ve been plagued by chronic migraines for years.”

67. Hoodooed

To be hoodooed means to be under the influence of bad luck or a curse. It suggests that someone or something has been jinxed or hexed, resulting in a string of unfortunate events.

  • For instance, “Ever since he broke that mirror, he’s been hoodooed.”
  • In a conversation about a series of mishaps, someone might say, “I feel like I’ve been hoodooed lately.”
  • A person might describe a streak of bad luck by saying, “I must be hoodooed because everything seems to go wrong for me.”

68. Unfortunate twist

An unfortunate twist refers to an unexpected turn of events that brings about negative consequences or outcomes. It implies a sudden change in circumstances that leads to an unfortunate outcome.

  • For example, “The story took an unfortunate twist when the protagonist lost everything.”
  • In a discussion about a movie plot, someone might say, “The film had a lot of unexpected twists and turns, but the most unfortunate twist was the death of the main character.”
  • A person might describe a series of unfortunate events by saying, “It started with a small mistake, and then there was one unfortunate twist after another.”
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