Top 60 Slang For Mental Health – Meaning & Usage

Mental health is an important topic that affects us all, yet discussing it can sometimes feel daunting. But fear not, we’ve got your back! Our team has put together a list of slang terms related to mental health that not only sheds light on the subject but also adds a touch of humor and relatability. So sit back, relax, and get ready to explore a new side of mental health through the lens of modern language.

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1. Cuckoo

This term is often used to describe someone who is mentally unstable or exhibiting strange behavior. It is derived from the sound of a cuckoo bird, which is associated with madness or insanity.

  • For example, “She went completely cuckoo after her breakup.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s erratic actions, one might say, “He’s gone cuckoo, I tell you.”
  • A person jokingly describing their own forgetfulness might say, “I must be going cuckoo because I can’t remember where I put my keys.”

2. Bonkers

This slang term is used to describe someone who is acting in a wild, irrational, or nonsensical manner. It is often used in a lighthearted or humorous way.

  • For instance, “That party last night was bonkers!”
  • In a discussion about a chaotic situation, one might say, “Things went bonkers at work today.”
  • A person expressing disbelief or astonishment might exclaim, “You’re telling me he jumped off a cliff? That’s bonkers!”

3. Off their rocker

This phrase is used to describe someone who is behaving in a mentally unstable or irrational way. It suggests that the person has lost their grip on reality or is not thinking clearly.

  • For example, “She’s completely off her rocker if she thinks she can fly.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s irrational decision, one might say, “He’s really off his rocker to quit his stable job.”
  • A person expressing their concern for someone’s mental state might say, “I think he’s off his rocker lately. He’s been acting really strange.”

4. Loopy

This term is used to describe someone who is acting in a strange, eccentric, or unpredictable manner. It suggests that the person’s thoughts or behavior may be disconnected from reality.

  • For instance, “She’s been acting really loopy lately, talking about aliens and conspiracy theories.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s erratic actions, one might say, “He went completely loopy after losing his job.”
  • A person jokingly describing their own forgetfulness might say, “I must be getting loopy in my old age because I keep forgetting things.”

5. Cray-cray

This term is a playful way of saying “crazy.” It is an exaggerated version of the word and is often used in a lighthearted or joking manner.

  • For example, “That roller coaster was cray-cray!”
  • In a discussion about a chaotic situation, one might say, “Things got cray-cray at the party last night.”
  • A person expressing their disbelief or astonishment might exclaim, “You’re telling me she climbed Mount Everest? That’s cray-cray!”

6. Psycho

This term is often used in a derogatory manner to describe someone who is mentally unstable or exhibits violent or erratic behavior. It is important to note that using this term to label someone with a mental illness is stigmatizing and incorrect.

  • For example, “He went psycho and started attacking everyone in the room.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “You’re acting like a total psycho right now.”
  • A person might jokingly refer to themselves as a psycho when they make a mistake, saying, “I can’t believe I forgot my keys again, I’m such a psycho.”

7. Schizo

This term is a derogatory slang for someone with schizophrenia, a serious mental disorder that affects a person’s thoughts, feelings, and behavior. It is important to use respectful language when discussing mental health conditions.

  • For instance, “He’s always talking to himself, he must be schizo.”
  • In a conversation about mental illnesses, someone might say, “Schizo is a term that should never be used to describe someone with schizophrenia.”
  • A person might mistakenly use the term schizo to describe someone who is exhibiting unusual behavior, saying, “I thought he was schizo because he was acting so strangely.”

8. Bipolar bear

This term is a play on words, combining the term “bipolar” with the animal “polar bear.” It is important to note that using this term to describe someone with bipolar disorder is stigmatizing and trivializes the condition.

  • For example, “She’s a real bipolar bear, you never know what mood she’ll be in.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “Using terms like bipolar bear only perpetuates stereotypes and misunderstandings.”
  • A person might use the term bipolar bear in a lighthearted manner to describe their own mood swings, saying, “I feel like a bipolar bear today, I can’t make up my mind.”

9. Depressed AF

This term is an abbreviation for “depressed as f**k” and is used to describe feeling extremely sad or down. It is important to recognize that depression is a serious mental health condition and using this term casually can trivialize the experiences of those who are truly struggling.

  • For instance, “I failed my exam and now I’m depressed AF.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “Using phrases like depressed AF minimizes the real struggles of those with clinical depression.”
  • A person might use the term depressed AF to express their current emotional state, saying, “I’m feeling so overwhelmed and sad, I’m depressed AF right now.”

10. Anxious AF

This term is an abbreviation for “anxious as f**k” and is used to describe feeling extremely worried or anxious. It is important to note that anxiety is a legitimate mental health condition and using this term casually can diminish the experiences of those who are truly suffering.

  • For example, “I have a presentation tomorrow and I’m anxious AF.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “Using phrases like anxious AF can undermine the severity of anxiety disorders.”
  • A person might use the term anxious AF to express their heightened state of worry, saying, “I can’t stop thinking about what could go wrong, I’m anxious AF.”

11. OCD AF

This slang term is used to describe someone who exhibits extreme or excessive behaviors related to Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). It emphasizes the intensity or severity of their OCD tendencies.

  • For example, “She’s always organizing her desk and cleaning everything. She’s OCD AF.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s meticulous attention to detail, one might say, “He’s OCD AF when it comes to his work.”
  • A person might self-reflect and say, “I know it’s a bit OCD AF, but I have to have everything in its proper place.”

12. PTSD

This refers to a mental health condition that can develop after experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event. It is characterized by symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, and severe anxiety.

  • For instance, “He served in the military and has been diagnosed with PTSD.”
  • In a discussion about the impact of trauma, someone might say, “PTSD can greatly affect a person’s daily life and relationships.”
  • A person might share their personal experience by saying, “I have PTSD from a car accident, and certain triggers can set off panic attacks.”

13. Triggered

This slang term is used to describe someone who has experienced a strong emotional reaction or has been reminded of a traumatic event or unpleasant memory. It implies that the person is easily upset or disturbed by certain triggers.

  • For example, “I saw a picture of my ex and got triggered.”
  • In a conversation about sensitive topics, someone might say, “Let’s avoid discussing that, it could trigger some people.”
  • A person might acknowledge their own triggers and say, “I get triggered by loud noises, so I always wear noise-canceling headphones.”

14. Freaking out

This slang term is used to describe someone who is experiencing extreme anxiety or panic. It emphasizes the intensity of their emotional state and suggests a loss of control.

  • For instance, “I have a big presentation tomorrow, and I’m freaking out.”
  • In a discussion about stressful situations, someone might say, “I was freaking out when I lost my keys.”
  • A person might share their experience by saying, “I was freaking out during the roller coaster ride, but I managed to stay calm.”

15. Losing it

This slang term is used to describe someone who is on the verge of losing emotional or mental control. It suggests that the person is struggling to maintain composure or cope with a situation.

  • For example, “After a long day at work, I feel like I’m losing it.”
  • In a conversation about stress, someone might say, “I’m so overwhelmed, I feel like I’m losing it.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I can’t find my phone anywhere, and I’m losing it.”

16. Unhinged

This term is used to describe someone who is mentally unstable or emotionally volatile. It suggests a lack of control or stability in one’s mental state.

  • For example, “After the stressful week, she felt completely unhinged.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s erratic behavior, one might say, “He’s become completely unhinged lately.”
  • A person describing their own emotional state might say, “I feel like I’m on the verge of becoming unhinged.”

17. Meltdown

A meltdown refers to a sudden and intense emotional breakdown or outburst, often characterized by a loss of control or composure. It can be triggered by stress, frustration, or overwhelming emotions.

  • For instance, “After a long day at work, she had a meltdown and started crying.”
  • In a parenting discussion, someone might share, “My toddler had a meltdown in the grocery store today.”
  • A person describing their own emotional experience might say, “I had a meltdown and couldn’t stop yelling.”

18. Nervous wreck

This phrase is used to describe someone who is extremely anxious or worried, often to the point of being unable to function or make decisions. It suggests a state of constant nervousness or unease.

  • For example, “Before a big presentation, she’s always a nervous wreck.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s anxiety, one might say, “He’s a nervous wreck whenever he has to speak in public.”
  • A person describing their own anxiety might say, “I’m a nervous wreck before exams.”

19. Mental breakdown

A mental breakdown refers to a severe and sudden onset of mental distress or instability, often resulting in the inability to function normally. It can be triggered by intense stress, trauma, or other psychological factors.

  • For instance, “After months of pressure, he had a mental breakdown and had to take a leave of absence.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might share, “I’ve experienced multiple mental breakdowns in my life.”
  • A person describing their own experience might say, “I felt like I was on the verge of a mental breakdown.”

20. Burnout

Burnout refers to a state of emotional, mental, and physical exhaustion caused by prolonged stress, overwork, or lack of balance. It often leads to a decreased sense of accomplishment and motivation.

  • For example, “After working long hours for months, she experienced burnout and needed a break.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, one might say, “Burnout is a common problem in high-pressure jobs.”
  • A person describing their own experience might say, “I’ve been feeling burnout lately and need to prioritize self-care.”

21. Frayed

This term is used to describe someone who is feeling overwhelmed or mentally exhausted. It can also refer to a person who is experiencing heightened emotions or anxiety.

  • For example, “I’ve been working long hours and I’m feeling frayed.”
  • A person might say, “I feel so frayed after dealing with all the deadlines.”
  • Someone experiencing emotional distress might say, “I’m feeling really frayed right now.”

22. Snapping

This term is used to describe someone who is on the verge of losing control or becoming overwhelmed by their emotions or stress. It can also refer to a person who is experiencing a mental or emotional breakdown.

  • For instance, “I’ve been under so much pressure, I feel like I’m snapping.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t handle any more stress, I’m going to snap.”
  • Someone experiencing extreme emotional distress might say, “I feel like I’m snapping, I can’t hold it together anymore.”

23. On edge

This term is used to describe someone who is feeling tense, anxious, or on high alert. It can also refer to a person who is easily irritable or quick to react.

  • For example, “I’ve been on edge all day, I can’t relax.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really on edge lately, everything seems to bother me.”
  • Someone experiencing heightened anxiety might say, “I’m constantly on edge, I can’t shake this feeling of unease.”

24. Struggling

This term is used to describe someone who is having a hard time dealing with their emotions, thoughts, or daily tasks. It can also refer to a person who is facing challenges or obstacles in their mental health journey.

  • For instance, “I’m struggling to keep up with my workload.”
  • A person might say, “I’m struggling with my mental health, it’s been a tough road.”
  • Someone experiencing difficulties in their personal life might say, “I’m really struggling right now, everything feels overwhelming.”

25. Cracked up

This term is used to describe someone who is emotionally or mentally unstable. It can also refer to a person who is on the verge of a breakdown or experiencing extreme distress.

  • For example, “I feel like I’m cracked up, I can’t hold it together.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been through so much, I’m starting to feel cracked up.”
  • Someone experiencing emotional turmoil might say, “I’m completely cracked up, I don’t know how much more I can handle.”

26. Spaced out

This term is often used to describe someone who is mentally or emotionally disconnected from their surroundings. It can also refer to feeling disoriented or in a dream-like state.

  • For instance, “I’ve been so stressed lately that I’ve been feeling really spaced out.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t concentrate on my work today, I was totally spaced out.”
  • Someone might describe a friend as “always appearing spaced out,“always appearing spaced out, like they’re in another world.”

27. Zonked

This slang term is used to describe someone who is extremely tired or worn out, often to the point of feeling mentally drained.

  • For example, “I pulled an all-nighter studying for the exam and now I’m completely zonked.”
  • A person might say, “I worked a double shift today and I’m zonked.”
  • Someone might describe themselves as “feeling zonked after a long day of running errands.”
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28. Fried

This term is used to describe someone who is mentally exhausted or overwhelmed, often as a result of excessive stress or overstimulation.

  • For instance, “I’ve been working non-stop for days, my brain feels completely fried.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t handle any more work right now, I’m fried.”
  • Someone might describe a friend as “looking fried after pulling an all-nighter.”

29. Batty

This slang term is used to describe someone who is acting in an eccentric or irrational manner, often suggesting mental instability or craziness.

  • For example, “She’s been acting really batty lately, talking to herself and wearing mismatched clothes.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t mind my grandma, she’s a little batty.”
  • Someone might describe a coworker as “going batty from the stress of the job.”

30. Demented

This term is used to describe someone who is mentally deranged or exhibiting irrational behavior. It implies a severe disturbance in mental functioning.

  • For instance, “The killer’s demented actions shocked the community.”
  • A person might say, “He’s always had a demented sense of humor.”
  • Someone might describe a movie as “a dark and demented thriller.”

31. Loon

This term is used to describe someone who is considered to be mentally unstable or insane. It is often used derogatorily.

  • For example, “He’s a total loon, always talking to himself.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s erratic behavior, one might say, “I think he’s got a few screws loose, he’s a real loon.”
  • A person might express concern by saying, “I’m worried about her, she’s been acting like a loon lately.”

32. Screw loose

This phrase is used to describe someone who is mentally unstable or has some kind of mental health issue. It implies that there is something not quite right with the person.

  • For instance, “He’s got a screw loose, he’s always saying weird things.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s odd behavior, one might say, “I think she’s got a screw loose, she’s just not normal.”
  • A person might express frustration by saying, “I can’t deal with him anymore, he’s got too many screws loose.”

33. Manic

This term is used to describe someone who is experiencing an episode of mania, which is a symptom of bipolar disorder. It refers to a state of high energy, excitement, and impulsiveness.

  • For example, “She’s in a manic phase right now, she hasn’t slept in days.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s erratic behavior, one might say, “He’s acting manic, he can’t sit still.”
  • A person might express concern by saying, “I’m worried about her, she’s been acting really manic lately.”

34. Depressed

This term is used to describe a state of emotional and mental low mood. It is often associated with feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and lack of interest or pleasure in activities.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling really depressed lately, I can’t seem to find joy in anything.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, one might say, “Depression is a serious condition that requires professional help.”
  • A person might express empathy by saying, “I’m sorry to hear you’re feeling depressed, is there anything I can do to help?”

35. Anxious

This term is used to describe a state of excessive worry, fear, or unease. It is often associated with physical symptoms such as restlessness, rapid heartbeat, and sweating.

  • For example, “I’m feeling really anxious about the upcoming presentation.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s nervousness, one might say, “She’s always anxious, it’s hard for her to relax.”
  • A person might express understanding by saying, “I know how it feels to be anxious, it can be overwhelming.”

36. Bipolar

A mental health condition characterized by extreme mood swings, ranging from depressive episodes to manic episodes. The term “bipolar” is often used colloquially to describe someone who experiences intense mood changes.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s acting so bipolar today, she was happy just a minute ago.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “Bipolar disorder affects approximately 2.8% of the U.S. population.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “Living with bipolar can be challenging, but with the right treatment, it’s manageable.”

37. OCD

A mental health condition characterized by recurring, unwanted thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors (compulsions). The term “OCD” is often used colloquially to describe someone who is very particular or has a need for order.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m so OCD about keeping my books organized.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might mention, “OCD affects approximately 2.3% of the global population.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “Living with OCD can be exhausting, but therapy and medication have helped me manage my symptoms.”

38. Panic attack

A sudden and overwhelming surge of anxiety or fear, often accompanied by physical symptoms such as a rapid heartbeat, shortness of breath, and sweating. The term “panic attack” is used to describe a specific episode of intense anxiety.

  • For example, someone might say, “I had a panic attack in the middle of the grocery store.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “Panic attacks can be triggered by certain situations or can occur seemingly out of nowhere.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “During a panic attack, I feel like I’m losing control and can’t breathe. It’s terrifying.”

39. Therapy sesh

A colloquial term used to refer to a session with a mental health professional, such as a therapist or counselor. “Therapy sesh” is often used informally to describe a scheduled appointment for therapy.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a therapy sesh later today to work through some issues.”
  • In a conversation about self-care, a person might mention, “I make sure to prioritize my therapy seshes to take care of my mental health.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “My therapy seshes have been instrumental in helping me navigate my emotions and develop coping strategies.”

40. Mind games

A colloquial term used to describe tactics or behaviors that manipulate or confuse someone’s thoughts or emotions. “Mind games” often refers to actions that are intended to control or deceive others.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always playing mind games with me, making me doubt myself.”
  • In a discussion about toxic relationships, a person might mention, “Mind games can be emotionally abusive and damaging.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I had to end the relationship because they were constantly playing mind games with me, making me question my own sanity.”

41. Nuts

This slang term is often used to describe someone who is mentally unstable or irrational. It can also be used to refer to something that is strange or bizarre.

  • For example, “He went nuts and started screaming at everyone.”
  • Someone might say, “That idea is nuts, it’ll never work.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might ask, “Do you think he’s going nuts?”

42. Whacko

This derogatory term is used to describe someone who is mentally unstable or eccentric. It is considered offensive and should be avoided in respectful conversations.

  • For instance, “He’s a complete whacko, always talking to himself.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t listen to her, she’s just a whacko.”
  • In a discussion about mental health stigma, someone might mention, “Using terms like whacko perpetuates negative stereotypes about people with mental illnesses.”

43. Mad

This slang term is often used to describe someone who is mentally unstable or irrational. It can also mean angry or upset.

  • For example, “He went mad and started throwing things.”
  • A person might say, “She’s mad, don’t bother trying to reason with her.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might ask, “Do you think he’s going mad?”

44. Nutter

This derogatory term is used to describe someone who is mentally unstable or eccentric. It is considered offensive and should be avoided in respectful conversations.

  • For instance, “He’s a complete nutter, always saying strange things.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t pay attention to her, she’s just a nutter.”
  • In a discussion about mental health stigma, someone might mention, “Using terms like nutter contributes to the negative perception of people with mental illnesses.”

45. Loony tunes

This slang term is often used to describe someone who is mentally unstable or irrational. It is derived from the cartoon series “Looney Tunes,” which features characters with exaggerated and unpredictable behavior.

  • For example, “He’s acting totally loony tunes, laughing for no reason.”
  • A person might say, “She’s gone loony tunes, talking to imaginary friends.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might ask, “Do you think he’s becoming loony tunes?”

46. Cracked

This term is often used to describe someone who is mentally unstable or has lost touch with reality. It is a derogatory term that can be offensive to those with mental health conditions.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s completely cracked, talking to imaginary people.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might comment, “Using terms like ‘cracked’ only perpetuates stigma and discrimination.”
  • Another might express concern, “I think she’s cracked, we should encourage her to seek help.”

47. Unbalanced

This term refers to someone who is emotionally or mentally unstable. It suggests a lack of stability and control over one’s emotions or thoughts.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s acting so unbalanced lately, I’m worried about his mental health.”
  • In a discussion about mental health awareness, someone might mention, “Using terms like ‘unbalanced’ can further stigmatize individuals struggling with mental health.”
  • Another might express empathy, “I’ve felt unbalanced before, it’s important to seek support and understanding.”

48. Disturbed

This term describes someone who is emotionally troubled or experiencing distress. It implies a disruption in one’s emotional well-being or mental state.

  • For example, someone might say, “She seems really disturbed lately, I hope she’s okay.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might comment, “Using terms like ‘disturbed’ can perpetuate negative stereotypes and hinder open discussions.”
  • Another might show concern, “If you notice someone acting disturbed, it’s important to offer support and encourage them to seek help.”

49. Unwell

This term is used to describe someone who is not feeling well mentally or emotionally. It implies a state of being mentally or emotionally sick or unhealthy.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m feeling unwell today, I need some time to take care of my mental health.”
  • In a discussion about self-care, someone might mention, “Recognizing when you’re feeling unwell and taking steps to prioritize your mental health is crucial.”
  • Another might express empathy, “If you’re feeling unwell mentally, remember that it’s okay to reach out for support and seek professional help.”

50. Deranged

This term is used to describe someone who is mentally disturbed or insane. It suggests a severe disruption in one’s mental state or behavior.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s acting deranged, we should be careful around him.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might comment, “Using terms like ‘deranged’ perpetuates harmful stereotypes and prevents open discussions.”
  • Another might express concern, “If you suspect someone is deranged, it’s important to approach the situation with empathy and encourage them to seek professional help.”

51. Fractured

This term refers to a state of mental instability or emotional distress. It suggests that a person’s mental health is broken or fragmented.

  • For example, someone might say, “After the accident, he seemed a bit fractured.”
  • In a therapy session, a person might describe their emotions as, “I feel fractured, like I’m falling apart.”
  • A friend might express concern, “I’ve noticed you’ve been acting a little fractured lately. Is everything okay?”

52. Unsound

This term describes a person’s mental state as being unsound or not in a healthy condition. It implies that their mental health is compromised or impaired.

  • For instance, someone might say, “His behavior is becoming increasingly unsound.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a professional might explain, “Unsound refers to a range of mental illnesses and disorders.”
  • A person might express concern for a loved one, “I’m worried about her. Her mental state seems unsound.”

53. Touched

This term suggests that a person’s mental health has been affected or altered in some way. It can imply a mild level of mental instability or eccentricity.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a bit touched in the head.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might ask, “Have you noticed any signs that he’s touched?”
  • A friend might describe someone’s behavior as, “She’s always been a little touched, but she means well.”

54. Daft

This term is used to describe someone as being crazy or mentally unstable. It suggests a lack of rationality or sound judgment.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s gone completely daft.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might explain, “Daft is a derogatory term used to stigmatize those with mental illness.”
  • A friend might express concern, “I think she’s going daft. Her behavior has been really erratic lately.”

55. Gaga

This term is used to describe someone as being crazy or mentally unstable. It implies a state of irrationality or confusion.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s gone gaga.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might ask, “Have you noticed any signs that he’s going gaga?”
  • A friend might express concern, “I’m worried about him. He’s been acting really gaga lately.”

56. Barmy

This term is used to describe someone who is considered mentally unstable or irrational. It is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner.

  • For example, “He’s acting barmy again, talking to imaginary friends.”
  • In a joking manner, someone might say, “I must be barmy to have signed up for this marathon.”
  • A person might describe a chaotic situation as “absolute barmy madness.”
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57. Mental

“Mental” is a slang term used to describe someone or something that is perceived as crazy or irrational. It can also be used to express frustration or disbelief.

  • For instance, “She’s mental if she thinks she can pull off that stunt.”
  • In a joking manner, someone might say, “I’m going mental trying to find my keys.”
  • A person might exclaim, “That party last night was mental!”

58. Nutjob

This term is derogatory and used to describe someone who is considered mentally unstable or crazy. It is often used in a negative or insulting manner.

  • For example, “Stay away from him, he’s a total nutjob.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “You’re a nutjob if you believe that conspiracy theory.”
  • A person might express frustration by exclaiming, “Dealing with her is like dealing with a bunch of nutjobs!”

59. Down in the dumps

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling down, sad, or depressed. It conveys a sense of low mood or emotional distress.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling down in the dumps ever since I lost my job.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s been down in the dumps lately due to a breakup.”
  • A person might express empathy by saying, “I’m sorry to hear you’re feeling down in the dumps. Is there anything I can do to help?”

60. Mental health warrior

This term is used to describe someone who actively advocates for mental health awareness, support, and destigmatization. It conveys a sense of strength, resilience, and dedication to promoting mental well-being.

  • For example, “She’s a mental health warrior, always fighting for better access to resources.”
  • In a supportive context, someone might say, “You’re a mental health warrior for sharing your story and helping others.”
  • A person might express admiration by saying, “I look up to mental health warriors like you who are making a difference.”