Top 56 Slang For Mouth – Meaning & Usage

The mouth, an essential part of our everyday lives, has a language all its own. From slang terms to playful expressions, we’ve rounded up the top slang words for the mouth that are sure to leave you grinning from ear to ear. Whether you’re looking to expand your vocabulary or simply curious about the latest linguistic trends, this listicle is a must-read for anyone who wants to stay in the know. So, get ready to pucker up and dive into this lip-smacking collection of mouth slang.

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1. Bazoo

Bazoo is a slang term for mouth. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Shut your bazoo and listen to what I have to say!”
  • In a comedy routine, a comedian might make a joke like, “I had to pick my bazoo up off the floor after that punchline.”
  • A person might use the term when describing a loud or talkative individual, saying, “He never stops running his bazoo.”

2. Cakehole

Cakehole is a slang term for mouth. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Shut your cakehole and let me finish my story!”
  • In a conversation about eating, someone might comment, “I can’t wait to stuff my cakehole with that delicious dessert.”
  • A person might use the term to express frustration or annoyance, saying, “Why can’t you keep your cakehole shut for once?”

3. Chops

Chops can refer to either the mouth or someone’s skill or talent in a particular area.

  • For example, someone might say, “Watch your chops!” to warn someone to be careful with their words.
  • In a discussion about music, a person might comment, “He’s got some serious guitar chops.”
  • A chef might use the term when describing their cooking abilities, saying, “I’ve been working on my culinary chops for years.”

4. Clam

Clam is a slang term for mouth. It is often used in a humorous or light-hearted way.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Close your clam and listen to what I’m saying!”
  • In a playful argument, one person might retort, “Why don’t you open your clam and speak up?”
  • A person might use the term to describe someone who is being secretive or not sharing information, saying, “She’s as tight-lipped as a clam.”

5. Clamshell

Clamshell is a slang term for mouth. It is a less common term compared to others on this list.

  • For example, someone might say, “Keep your clamshell shut and let me finish my sentence!”
  • In a conversation about eating, a person might comment, “I can’t wait to stuff my clamshell with that delicious food.”
  • A person might use the term to express frustration or annoyance, saying, “Why can’t you keep your clamshell closed for once?”

6. Gob

Gob is a slang term for mouth. It is often used in British English.

  • For example, “Shut your gob!” is a common phrase used to tell someone to be quiet.
  • Another example is, “He’s got a big gob on him,” which means someone talks a lot.

7. Hash-trap

Hash-trap is a slang term for teeth. It is often used to refer to someone’s smile or dental health.

  • For instance, “She has a beautiful hash-trap,” means she has nice teeth.
  • Another example is, “I need to brush my hash-trap,” which means someone needs to brush their teeth.

8. Kisser

Kisser is a slang term for mouth. It is often used to refer to someone’s face or the act of kissing.

  • For example, “Get your hands off my kisser!” is a phrase used to tell someone to stop touching your face.
  • Another example is, “He’s got a big kisser on him,” which means someone has a large mouth.

9. Laughing gear

Laughing gear is a slang term for mouth. It is often used to refer to someone’s ability to laugh or speak.

  • For instance, “Put a sock in your laughing gear!” is a phrase used to tell someone to be quiet.
  • Another example is, “He’s got a big laughing gear,” which means someone has a loud or boisterous laugh.

10. Maw

Maw is a slang term for mouth. It is often used to refer to someone’s appetite or ability to eat.

  • For example, “He’s got a big maw on him,” means someone has a big appetite.
  • Another example is, “Feed your maw,” which means someone needs to eat.

11. Mush

This term is slang for food or a meal. It can also refer to something that is soft or easily chewed.

  • For example, “Let’s grab some mush at the diner.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not in the mood for anything heavy, just some mush.”
  • Another might comment, “That soup looks like a bowl of mush.”

12. Neb

This slang term refers to the nose. It is often used in British slang.

  • For instance, “I’ve got a cold and my neb won’t stop running.”
  • A person might say, “She’s always sticking her neb in other people’s business.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s got a big red neb from all that sneezing.”

13. Ned

In Scottish slang, this term is used to describe a person who is foolish or stupid. It is often used as an insult.

  • For example, “Don’t listen to him, he’s a total ned.”
  • A person might say, “Those neds are causing trouble again.”
  • Another might comment, “I can’t believe I used to hang out with a bunch of neds.”

14. North and south

This Cockney rhyming slang term is used to refer to the mouth. “North and south” rhymes with “mouth”.

  • For instance, “Shut your north and south!”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got a sore north and south from talking all day.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s got a big grin on his north and south.”

15. Oral cavity

This term is the medical or scientific way to refer to the mouth. It specifically refers to the space inside the mouth where food is chewed and swallowed.

  • For example, “The dentist examined my oral cavity.”
  • A person might say, “I have a sore in my oral cavity.”
  • Another might comment, “The oral cavity plays a crucial role in digestion.”

16. Os

“Os” is a slang term for the mouth, specifically referring to the oral cavity. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Shut your os and listen to what I have to say.”
  • In a conversation about eating, someone might comment, “This food is so good, it’s making my os water.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I can’t keep my os shut, I always have something to say.”

17. Piehole

The term “piehole” is a slang word for the mouth. It is often used in a playful or humorous way.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Shut your piehole and let me finish my story.”
  • In a conversation about eating, a person might comment, “I’m so hungry, I could eat a whole pie in one bite. Open up your piehole!”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Watch out, or I’ll stick a pie in your piehole!”

18. Potato trap

The term “potato trap” is a slang phrase for the mouth. It is a playful and creative way to refer to the oral cavity.

  • For example, someone might say, “Quit running your potato trap and just eat your food.”
  • In a conversation about talking too much, a person might comment, “You have such a big potato trap, you never stop talking!”
  • A friend might playfully say, “Hey, close your potato trap and listen to what I have to say!”

19. Puss

The term “puss” is a slang word for the mouth. It is a more informal way to refer to the oral cavity.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Shut your puss and let me speak.”
  • In a conversation about eating, a person might comment, “This food is so spicy, it’s burning my puss!”
  • A friend might playfully say, “You have a big puss, you never stop talking!”

20. Sucker

The term “sucker” is a slang word for the mouth. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Shut your sucker and listen to me.”
  • In a conversation about eating, a person might comment, “This candy is so good, it’s sticking to my sucker!”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “You talk too much, you’re such a sucker!”

21. Trap

This term is used to refer to the mouth, especially in a casual or slangy way.

  • For example, “Shut your trap!” is a common phrase used to tell someone to stop talking.
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “What’s that coming out of your trap?”
  • A person might say, “I have a sore trap from talking too much.”

22. Yap

This slang term is used to refer to the mouth, often in a playful or derogatory manner.

  • For instance, “Shut your yap!” is a phrase used to tell someone to be quiet.
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I can’t believe what came out of your yap.”
  • A person might comment, “He’s always flapping his yap about something.”

23. Pie-hole

This slang term is used to refer to the mouth, usually in a lighthearted or humorous way.

  • For example, “Shut your pie-hole!” is a playful phrase used to tell someone to stop talking.
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “What’s that in your pie-hole?”
  • A person might say, “I need to fill my pie-hole with some delicious food.”

24. Chompers

This slang term is used to refer to the teeth, often in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For instance, “Brush your chompers!” is a phrase used to remind someone to clean their teeth.
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I need to get my chompers checked by the dentist.”
  • A person might comment, “She has a beautiful smile with shiny chompers.”

25. Smacker

This slang term is used to refer to the mouth, often in a playful or affectionate way.

  • For example, “Give me a smacker!” is a phrase used to ask for a kiss.
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I burned my smacker on hot pizza.”
  • A person might comment, “She has a pouty smacker that’s hard to resist.”

26. Mug

In slang terms, “mug” refers to the face, specifically the mouth area. It is often used to describe someone’s facial expression or the way they use their mouth while speaking or eating.

  • For example, “He had a big smile on his mug.”
  • A person might say, “Wipe that smirk off your mug.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s appearance, one might comment, “She has a pretty mug.”

27. Yapper

“Yapper” is a slang term for the mouth. It is often used to refer to someone who talks a lot or has a loud and active mouth.

  • For instance, “He can’t keep his yapper shut.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to hear any more nonsense from your yapper.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s ability to argue, one might comment, “She’s got a sharp yapper on her.”

28. Gab

In slang terms, “gab” is used to refer to talking or having a conversation. It can also imply idle or meaningless chatter.

  • For example, “We had a good gab about the latest gossip.”
  • A person might say, “Stop gabbing and get to the point.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s communication style, one might comment, “He’s got a gift for gab.”

29. Grill

When referring to the mouth, “grill” is used to specifically talk about the teeth. It is often used to describe someone’s dental appearance or to refer to dental work.

  • For instance, “He’s got a gold grill.”
  • A person might say, “Take care of your grill by brushing and flossing regularly.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s smile, one might comment, “She’s got a perfect grill.”

30. Lip

In slang terms, “lip” is used to refer to the mouth in general. It can also imply talking back or being disrespectful.

  • For example, “Don’t give me any lip.”
  • A person might say, “Watch your lip or you’ll get in trouble.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s ability to persuade, one might comment, “He’s got a silver tongue and knows how to use his lip.”

31. Snout

In slang, “snout” can refer to either the nose or the mouth. It is often used in a derogatory or humorous way.

  • For example, someone might say, “Keep your snout out of my business!” meaning “Stay out of my affairs.”
  • In a playful context, a person might tease, “Close your snout and finish your food!”
  • In a comedic setting, a character might say, “I couldn’t help but laugh when he shoved a whole cake into his snout!”

32. Hatch

In slang, “hatch” is another term used to refer to the mouth. It is often used informally and can have a playful or lighthearted connotation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Put a sock in it, will ya? Close your hatch!” meaning “Be quiet.”
  • In a joking manner, a person might tease, “You’ve got a big hatch! Stop talking so much.”
  • In a comedic scenario, a character might exclaim, “Open your hatch and say ‘ahhh’!” as part of a funny scene.
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33. Pie hole

In slang, “pie hole” is a humorous and sometimes derogatory term for the mouth. It is often used to express annoyance or frustration.

  • For example, someone might say, “Shut your pie hole!” meaning “Be quiet” or “Stop talking.”
  • In a humorous context, a person might say, “I could eat a whole pie with this big pie hole of mine!”
  • In a comedic scenario, a character might exclaim, “Watch out, the pie hole is about to unleash some sarcasm!”

34. Pout

In slang, “pout” refers to the act of sulking or making a sad or displeased facial expression. It is often used to describe someone’s reaction or behavior.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Stop pouting and cheer up!” meaning “Stop being sad and try to be happy.”
  • In a playful manner, a person might tease, “Don’t pout just because you didn’t get your way.”
  • In a comedic setting, a character might exaggerate their pout and say, “Look at this pout! I should be in a magazine!”

35. Muncher

In slang, “muncher” refers to someone who eats or chews food. It is often used informally and can have a lighthearted or playful connotation.

  • For example, someone might say, “You’re a big muncher!” meaning “You eat a lot.”
  • In a joking manner, a person might tease, “Watch out, the muncher is coming for your snacks!”
  • In a comedic scenario, a character might exaggerate their munching sounds and say, “Listen to this muncher! I can eat anything!”

36. Chatterbox

A chatterbox is someone who talks a lot or speaks quickly and incessantly. It is often used to describe someone who is overly talkative or has a tendency to babble.

  • For example, “She’s such a chatterbox, she never stops talking.”
  • In a group conversation, someone might say, “Okay, enough from the chatterbox. Let someone else speak.”
  • A parent might affectionately refer to their child as a chatterbox, saying, “My little one has turned into quite the chatterbox lately.”

37. Clapper

This term refers to the mouth, particularly when it is used to speak or make noise. It is derived from the action of clapping, which involves the movement of hands coming together, similar to the movement of the mouth when speaking.

  • For instance, “Shut your clapper and listen!”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe what came out of his clapper.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might yell, “Watch what you say or I’ll shut your clapper for good!”

38. Jabber

Jabber is used to describe fast and incoherent speech. It implies that someone is talking nonsense or speaking without much thought or clarity.

  • For example, “Stop jabbering and get to the point.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Sorry for jabbering on, I tend to ramble.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t stand listening to his constant jabber.”

39. Blabber

Blabber refers to the act of revealing secrets or confidential information. It implies that someone cannot keep information to themselves and has a tendency to gossip or talk indiscreetly.

  • For instance, “Don’t blabber about what I told you.”
  • A person might say, “She’s such a blabber, you can’t trust her with anything.”
  • In a situation where someone accidentally reveals something, another person might say, “Nice blabber, now the surprise is ruined!”

40. Mumble

To mumble is to speak in a low, unclear, or indistinct manner. It implies that someone is not speaking clearly or enunciating their words properly.

  • For example, “Speak up, don’t mumble.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I couldn’t understand a word he mumbled.”
  • A parent might scold their child, saying, “Stop mumbling and speak clearly.”

41. Gullet

The gullet is another word for the throat, specifically the part that connects the mouth to the stomach. It is often used to refer to the passage through which food and drink travel when swallowed.

  • For example, someone might say, “That piece of steak got stuck in my gullet.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might ask, “Are you experiencing any pain or discomfort in your gullet?”
  • A person describing a big meal might say, “I stuffed so much food down my gullet, I thought I might burst!”

42. Munching machine

The term “munching machine” is a playful way to refer to the mouth. It emphasizes the act of eating or chewing and suggests an insatiable appetite.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My munching machine is always ready for a snack.”
  • In a conversation about food, a person might exclaim, “I’ve got a serious craving, time to fire up the munching machine!”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Close your munching machine while you chew, please.”

43. Flapper

The term “flapper” is slang for the lips. It refers to the movement of the lips when speaking or making certain sounds.

  • For example, someone might say, “She has beautiful flappers.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s speech, a person might comment, “I love the way she moves her flappers when she talks.”
  • A person describing a passionate kiss might say, “Our flappers were locked in a deep embrace.”

44. Face hole

The term “face hole” is a humorous way to refer to the mouth. It highlights the location of the mouth on the face and can be used in a lighthearted or silly context.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Put some food in your face hole!”
  • In a joking manner, a person might ask, “What’s going on in that face hole of yours?”
  • A parent might playfully tell their child, “Keep your face hole closed while I count to three!”

45. Gnashers

The term “gnashers” is slang for teeth. It emphasizes the action of grinding or clenching the teeth together.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to brush my gnashers before bed.”
  • In a conversation about dental hygiene, a person might ask, “How often do you floss your gnashers?”
  • A person describing a toothache might say, “My gnashers are killing me!”

46. Lip service

This term refers to saying something supportive or complimentary without actually meaning it. It implies that the person is just paying “lip service” to the idea or person.

  • For example, “She gave me nothing but lip service when I asked for her help.”
  • In a political context, someone might accuse a politician of just giving “lip service” to a certain issue.
  • A person might say, “Don’t just give me lip service, show me that you actually care.”

47. Chomper

This term is used to refer to a person’s teeth. It can also be used to describe someone who eats enthusiastically or with gusto.

  • For instance, “He flashed his chompers in a big smile.”
  • In a discussion about dental hygiene, someone might say, “Take care of your chompers by brushing and flossing regularly.”
  • A person might comment, “She’s got a great smile, thanks to her chompers.”

48. Talkbox

This term is used to refer to a person’s mouth, especially when it comes to speaking or expressing oneself.

  • For example, “Put a sock in it, I don’t want to hear any more from your talkbox.”
  • In a conversation about public speaking, someone might say, “It’s important to use your talkbox effectively to get your message across.”
  • A person might comment, “Her talkbox never seems to stop, she’s always talking.”

49. Munch trap

This term is used to refer to a person’s mouth, especially when it comes to eating or consuming food.

  • For instance, “Shut your munch trap and finish your dinner.”
  • In a discussion about table manners, someone might say, “Don’t talk with your mouth full, it’s rude.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t resist a delicious meal, my munch trap is always ready.”

50. Food hole

This term is used to refer to a person’s mouth, especially when it comes to eating or consuming food.

  • For example, “Put some food in your food hole, you must be hungry.”
  • In a conversation about different eating habits, someone might say, “He’s a picky eater, he only likes certain things in his food hole.”
  • A person might comment, “I love trying new dishes, my food hole is always ready for an adventure.”

51. Mumble hole

This term is used to refer to the mouth in a playful or lighthearted manner. It suggests that someone is mumbling or speaking incoherently.

  • For example, “Close your mumble hole and speak clearly!”
  • In a joking conversation, someone might say, “I can’t understand a word you’re saying with your mumble hole.”
  • A person might comment, “I need to shut my mumble hole before I say something I regret.”

52. Bite hole

This slang term is used to refer to the mouth, specifically when eating or biting into something.

  • For instance, “Open wide and take a bite with your bite hole!”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might say, “I can’t wait to try that delicious dish with my bite hole.”
  • A person might exclaim, “My bite hole is watering just thinking about that pizza!”

53. Snack hole

This term is used to refer to the mouth, particularly when eating snacks or small bites of food.

  • For example, “I need to satisfy my cravings with some snacks for my snack hole.”
  • In a conversation about favorite snacks, someone might say, “I can’t resist putting everything in my snack hole.”
  • A person might comment, “My snack hole is always ready for some tasty treats!”

54. Munch hole

This slang term is used to refer to the mouth, especially when eating or munching on food.

  • For instance, “I can’t stop stuffing my face with food using my munch hole.”
  • In a conversation about eating habits, someone might say, “I have a big appetite and a powerful munch hole.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I’m so hungry, I could eat a whole pizza with my munch hole!”

55. Yum-yum hole

This playful term is used to refer to the mouth, particularly when enjoying or savoring delicious food.

  • For example, “I can’t wait to taste that dessert with my yum-yum hole!”
  • In a conversation about favorite flavors, someone might say, “I love trying new dishes that make my yum-yum hole happy.”
  • A person might comment, “My yum-yum hole is ready for some mouthwatering treats!”

56. Beak

In slang, “beak” is a term used to refer to the mouth. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Shut your beak and listen!” when telling someone to be quiet.
  • A person jokingly commenting on someone’s eating habits might say, “Wow, you really know how to stuff your beak.”
  • In a conversation about talking too much, someone might say, “I can’t believe how much she can flap her beak.”