Top 36 Slang For Must – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the utmost importance or necessity, having the right slang at your fingertips can make all the difference. Join us as we unveil a collection of the coolest and most essential slang for “must” that will level up your communication game. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to stay in the loop, this list is a must-read for anyone wanting to spice up their vocabulary and sound effortlessly hip.

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1. Gotta

A shortened form of “got to” or “have got to.” It is used to express a strong need or obligation to do something.

  • For example, “I gotta finish this report before the deadline.”
  • A friend might say, “We gotta catch up soon!”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I gotta go grocery shopping later.”

2. Need to

A phrase used to indicate a requirement or obligation to do something.

  • For instance, “I need to study for my exam tomorrow.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “You need to clean your room.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “We need to submit the project proposal by Friday.”

3. Have to

A phrase that expresses a necessity or obligation to do something.

  • For example, “I have to attend the meeting this afternoon.”
  • A teacher might say, “You have to complete the homework assignment by tomorrow.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might mention, “We have to book our flights soon.”

4. Must-do

Refers to something that is considered essential or highly recommended.

  • For instance, “Visiting the Eiffel Tower is a must-do when in Paris.”
  • A travel blogger might write, “Here are the top must-do activities in New York City.”
  • In a conversation about bucket lists, someone might mention, “Skydiving is definitely a must-do for me.”

5. Required

Indicates that something is necessary or mandatory.

  • For example, “A valid ID is required to enter the club.”
  • A job listing might state, “Bachelor’s degree required.”
  • In a discussion about school policies, someone might say, “Attendance is required for all students.”

6. Obliged to

This phrase is often used to express a sense of obligation or duty to do something.

  • For example, “I am obliged to attend the meeting tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I feel obliged to help my friend move.”
  • In a formal setting, someone might state, “We are obliged to follow the rules and regulations.”

7. Got to

This phrase is a casual way of saying that something is necessary or required.

  • For instance, “I’ve got to finish this report by tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “We’ve got to be at the airport by 7 am.”
  • In a conversation about responsibilities, someone might mention, “I’ve got to take care of my family.”

8. Mandatory

This term is often used to describe something that is obligatory or necessary.

  • For example, “Wearing a seatbelt is mandatory while driving.”
  • A person might say, “Attendance is mandatory for all employees.”
  • In a discussion about laws, someone might mention, “It is mandatory to pay taxes.”

9. Essential

This word is used to describe something that is absolutely necessary or vital.

  • For instance, “Sleep is essential for good health.”
  • A person might say, “Communication is essential in a healthy relationship.”
  • In a conversation about job qualifications, someone might mention, “Experience is essential for this position.”

10. Indispensable

This term is used to emphasize that something is absolutely necessary and cannot be done without.

  • For example, “Water is indispensable for survival.”
  • A person might say, “Technology has become indispensable in our daily lives.”
  • In a discussion about team members, someone might mention, “Her expertise is indispensable to the project.”

11. Compulsory

Something that is required or mandatory. It refers to something that must be done or followed.

  • For example, “Wearing a seatbelt is compulsory while driving.”
  • In a school setting, a student might say, “Attendance is compulsory for all classes.”
  • A company policy might state, “Completing the safety training is compulsory for all employees.”

12. Vital

Something that is extremely important or necessary. It refers to something that is crucial or indispensable.

  • For instance, “Proper hydration is vital for good health.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “Effective communication is vital for the success of the team.”
  • A doctor might stress, “Regular exercise is vital for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.”

13. Imperative

Something that is of utmost importance or urgency. It refers to something that is essential or necessary.

  • For example, “It is imperative to follow safety protocols in a laboratory.”
  • In a military context, a commander might say, “Following orders is imperative for the success of the mission.”
  • A teacher might emphasize, “Understanding the basics is imperative for building advanced knowledge.”

14. Prerequisite

Something that must be achieved or fulfilled before something else can happen. It refers to a necessary condition or qualification.

  • For instance, “Completing the prerequisite courses is necessary before enrolling in advanced classes.”
  • In a job application, a requirement might be listed as, “A bachelor’s degree in a related field is a prerequisite for this position.”
  • A university might state, “Meeting the minimum GPA requirement is a prerequisite for graduation.”

15. Inevitable

Something that is certain to happen or occur. It refers to something that cannot be avoided or prevented.

  • For example, “Death is an inevitable part of life.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “The rise of artificial intelligence is inevitable.”
  • A person might reflect, “Change is inevitable, so it’s important to adapt and embrace it.”

16. Requisite

Something that is necessary or required in a particular situation or for a specific purpose.

  • For example, “A good education is a requisite for success in today’s job market.”
  • In a job description, it might state, “Experience in customer service is a requisite for this position.”
  • A college student might say, “Coffee is a requisite for pulling an all-nighter.”

17. Needful

Something that is necessary or required in a particular situation or for a specific purpose.

  • For instance, “The needful documents must be submitted before the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “Passport and visa are the needful for international trips.”
  • A person preparing for a party might ask, “Have you done the needful preparations for the event?”

18. Crucial

Something that is extremely important or necessary for the success or outcome of a situation.

  • For example, “Effective communication is crucial for building strong relationships.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might say, “This play is crucial for us to score a goal.”
  • A business owner might emphasize, “Customer satisfaction is crucial for the success of our company.”

19. Must-have

Something that is highly desired or considered necessary to have.

  • For instance, “The latest smartphone is a must-have for tech enthusiasts.”
  • In a fashion discussion, someone might say, “A little black dress is a must-have in every woman’s wardrobe.”
  • A person might recommend, “This book is a must-have for anyone interested in learning about history.”

20. Must-see

Something that is highly recommended or considered essential to watch or visit.

  • For example, “The Eiffel Tower is a must-see attraction when visiting Paris.”
  • In a movie review, a critic might say, “This film is a must-see for all fans of the genre.”
  • A person might suggest, “The sunset at the beach is a must-see experience.”

21. Must-read

This term is used to describe a book, article, or other written work that is highly recommended or considered essential for everyone to read. It implies that the content is valuable or important in some way.

  • For example, “This novel is a must-read for any fan of science fiction.”
  • A book review might say, “This memoir is a must-read for anyone interested in understanding the immigrant experience.”
  • A friend might recommend, “You have to read this article, it’s a must-read for anyone interested in politics.”

22. Must-watch

This phrase is used to describe a movie or TV show that is highly recommended or considered essential viewing. It suggests that the content is so good or important that it should not be missed.

  • For instance, “This new documentary is a must-watch for nature lovers.”
  • A film critic might say, “The performances in this movie are outstanding, it’s a must-watch for any cinephile.”
  • A friend might suggest, “You have to watch this show, it’s a must-watch for fans of crime dramas.”

23. Must-listen

This expression is used to describe a podcast, song, album, or other audio content that is highly recommended or considered essential listening. It implies that the content is worth hearing or is of particular significance.

  • For example, “This podcast episode is a must-listen for anyone interested in true crime.”
  • A music review might say, “This album is a must-listen for fans of alternative rock.”
  • A friend might recommend, “You need to listen to this song, it’s a must-listen for anyone going through a breakup.”

24. Required to

This phrase is used to indicate that something is necessary or mandatory. It implies that there is an obligation or expectation to fulfill a certain action.

  • For instance, “You are required to wear a helmet while riding a motorcycle.”
  • A sign might say, “ID is required to enter this establishment.”
  • A teacher might say, “It is required to complete the assignment by the due date.”

25. Compelled to

This expression is used to describe a strong feeling of being driven or obligated to do something. It implies a sense of duty or a powerful internal motivation.

  • For example, “I felt compelled to help the homeless man I saw on the street.”
  • A person might say, “I feel compelled to speak out against injustice.”
  • A writer might explain, “I am compelled to tell this story because it needs to be heard.”

26. Essential to

This term is used to describe something that is absolutely necessary or vital to a situation or outcome. It emphasizes the importance and indispensability of the item or action.

  • For example, “Sleep is essential to maintaining good health.”
  • In a recipe, a step might be described as “essential to achieving the desired flavor.”
  • A teacher might say, “Regular practice is essential to improving your skills in any subject.”

27. Pressing

This slang term refers to something that requires immediate attention or action. It implies a sense of urgency or importance that cannot be ignored.

  • For instance, “We have a pressing deadline and need to finish the project by tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation about priorities, someone might say, “This issue is pressing and should be addressed first.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “We have a pressing matter to discuss in the meeting today.”

28. Non-negotiable

When something is described as non-negotiable, it means that it cannot be changed or altered. It emphasizes that there is no room for negotiation or discussion on the matter.

  • For example, “Punctuality is non-negotiable for this job.”
  • In a contract, a clause might be labeled as “non-negotiable.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Doing homework is non-negotiable. It must be completed before any other activities.”

29. Unavoidable

This term is used to describe something that cannot be avoided or escaped. It emphasizes that the situation or outcome is certain and cannot be changed.

  • For instance, “Death is an unavoidable part of life.”
  • In a discussion about consequences, someone might say, “If you break the rules, punishment is unavoidable.”
  • A traveler might say, “Delays are unavoidable when flying during peak travel season.”

30. Key

When something is described as key, it means that it is essential or crucial to the success or functioning of a system or situation. It emphasizes the importance and significance of the item or action.

  • For example, “Communication is key in building strong relationships.”
  • In a team project, a member might say, “Collaboration is key to completing the task successfully.”
  • A coach might tell their players, “Focus and discipline are key to winning the game.”

31. Should

This term is used to indicate a recommendation or advice for a particular action or behavior. It implies that something is desirable or advisable to do, but not necessarily mandatory.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “You should eat your vegetables to stay healthy.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might suggest, “You should visit Paris if you get the chance.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “You should study for the exam to improve your chances of success.”

32. Necessary

This word implies that something is absolutely required or indispensable. It emphasizes the importance of a particular action or item.

  • For example, in a recipe, it might say, “Salt is necessary to enhance the flavor.”
  • During a safety briefing, someone might emphasize, “Wearing a seatbelt is necessary for your protection.”
  • In a job description, it might state, “A college degree is necessary for this position.”

33. Critical

This term signifies that something is of utmost importance or significance. It emphasizes the essential nature of a particular action or decision.

  • For instance, in a medical emergency, someone might say, “Time is critical, we need to act quickly.”
  • In a business meeting, a manager might stress, “Meeting the deadline is critical for the success of the project.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Teamwork is critical to achieving our goals.”

34. Obligatory

This word suggests that something is required or compulsory. It implies that there is a legal or moral obligation to do a particular action.

  • For example, in a classroom, a teacher might say, “Attendance is obligatory for all students.”
  • In a workplace, an employee might be informed, “Wearing a safety helmet is obligatory in the construction site.”
  • A government might pass a law stating, “Paying taxes is obligatory for all citizens.”

35. Inescapable

This term conveys the idea that something cannot be avoided or escaped. It implies that a particular action or situation is inevitable.

  • For instance, in a difficult situation, someone might say, “Confronting the issue is inescapable, we have to address it.”
  • In a conversation about aging, a person might remark, “Death is an inescapable part of life.”
  • A character in a book might reflect, “The consequences of his actions were inescapable, he had to face the music.”

36. Intrinsic

Something that is inherent, natural, or essential to a person or thing. It refers to qualities or characteristics that are fundamental and cannot be separated from the entity.

  • For example, “Hard work is intrinsic to success.”
  • In a discussion about art, one might say, “The artist’s creativity is intrinsic to their work.”
  • A teacher might emphasize to their students, “Understanding the concept is intrinsic to solving the problem.”
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