Top 36 Slang For Save – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to saving, we all want to be in the know with the latest lingo. From online shopping to budgeting apps, knowing the slang for save can make you feel like a money-saving pro. Get ready to level up your money game with our curated list of trendy terms that will have you feeling savvy and in-the-know!

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1. Stash

When you stash something, you are keeping it hidden or saving it for later.

  • For example, “I always stash some extra cash in case of emergencies.”
  • A person might say, “I stash my favorite snacks in my desk at work.”
  • Another person might ask, “Where did you stash the extra blankets?”

2. Hoard

When you hoard something, you are collecting and saving a large amount of it.

  • For instance, “She hoards books and has a huge library.”
  • A person might say, “I hoard office supplies. I have a drawer full of pens and paper.”
  • Another person might admit, “I hoard makeup. I can’t resist buying new products.”

3. Squirrel away

When you squirrel something away, you are saving or hiding it in a secretive or cautious manner.

  • For example, “He squirrels away money in a secret bank account.”
  • A person might say, “I squirrel away my favorite snacks so no one else can eat them.”
  • Another person might reveal, “I squirrel away my personal journals in a locked drawer.”

4. Tuck away

When you tuck something away, you are putting it in a safe or hidden place to save it for later.

  • For instance, “She tucked away her grandmother’s necklace in a jewelry box.”
  • A person might say, “I tuck away extra batteries in a drawer in case I need them.”
  • Another person might mention, “I tuck away my summer clothes during the winter months.”

5. Stockpile

When you stockpile something, you are gathering and saving a large amount of it for use in the future.

  • For example, “People stockpile food and supplies in case of a natural disaster.”
  • A person might say, “I stockpile beauty products when they go on sale.”
  • Another person might discuss, “I stockpile books and have a whole shelf dedicated to my collection.”

6. Reserve

To set something aside for future use or to keep it in a safe place. “Reserve” is often used when referring to saving money or resources for a specific purpose.

  • For example, “I need to reserve some money for my vacation next month.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to reserve this seat for my friend who’s running late.”
  • In a discussion about conservation, someone might mention, “We need to reserve these natural resources for future generations.”

7. Bank

To put money aside for future use or to accumulate savings. “Bank” can also refer to saving or storing something valuable or important.

  • For instance, “I need to bank some cash so I can buy a new car.”
  • A person might say, “I’m banking my vacation days for a big trip next year.”
  • In a discussion about data storage, someone might mention, “I always bank my important files on an external hard drive.”

8. Put aside

To save or reserve something for a later time or purpose. “Put aside” implies intentionally setting something aside and not using it immediately.

  • For example, “I need to put aside some time to study for my exams.”
  • A person might say, “I’m putting aside some money each month for emergencies.”
  • In a discussion about prioritizing tasks, someone might mention, “I always put aside the most important tasks for first thing in the morning.”

9. Set aside

To save or reserve something for a specific purpose or to separate it from other things. “Set aside” often implies a deliberate action of keeping something separate or distinct.

  • For instance, “I need to set aside some time for self-care.”
  • A person might say, “I’m setting aside a portion of my paycheck for retirement.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “It’s important to set aside money for unexpected expenses.”

10. Keep back

To save or reserve something for later use or to withhold or retain something. “Keep back” can also imply holding back emotions or information.

  • For example, “I’m going to keep back some of my earnings for investments.”
  • A person might say, “I’m keeping back some of the dessert for later.”
  • In a discussion about personal boundaries, someone might mention, “It’s important to keep back some of your time and energy for self-care.”

11. Cache

To save or store something in a secret or hidden place. “Cache” is often used to refer to saving or storing information or data on a computer.

  • For example, a tech-savvy person might say, “I’ll cache these files on my hard drive for easy access.”
  • In a conversation about survival skills, someone might mention, “It’s important to cache supplies in case of an emergency.”
  • A hiker might say, “I’ll cache some extra water bottles along the trail for when I need them.”

12. Preserve

To save or maintain something in its original or existing state. “Preserve” can also refer to saving food or other perishable items by preventing spoilage or decay.

  • For instance, a person discussing historical artifacts might say, “We need to preserve these ancient relics for future generations.”
  • In a conversation about environmental conservation, someone might argue, “We must take action to preserve our natural resources.”
  • A chef might say, “Canning is a great way to preserve fruits and vegetables for later use.”

13. Salting away

To save or set aside money or valuables for future use. “Salting away” often implies saving money in a secretive or hidden manner.

  • For example, a financial advisor might suggest, “You should start salting away some money for retirement.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might say, “I’ve been salting away a portion of my paycheck each month.”
  • A person discussing budgeting might mention, “It’s important to salt away some emergency funds for unexpected expenses.”

14. Lay by

To save or reserve something for later use. “Lay by” often implies setting aside money or resources for a specific purpose.

  • For instance, a person discussing vacation plans might say, “I need to lay by some money for a trip next year.”
  • In a conversation about home improvement, someone might mention, “I’m laying by some extra paint for touch-ups.”
  • A gardener might say, “I’ll lay by some seeds for next year’s planting season.”

15. Sock away

To save or store something, especially money, in a secure or hidden place. “Sock away” often implies saving a significant amount of money.

  • For example, a financial planner might advise, “You should sock away at least 10% of your income for long-term savings.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might say, “I’m trying to sock away enough money to buy a house.”
  • A person discussing frugality might mention, “I’ve been socking away every spare dollar to build my emergency fund.”

16. Squirrel

To “squirrel” means to save money for the future or set aside funds for a specific purpose.

  • For example, “I need to squirrel some money away for a vacation.”
  • A person discussing their financial goals might say, “I’m trying to squirrel away enough money to buy a house.”
  • Another might advise, “It’s always a good idea to squirrel some money for emergencies.”

17. Sock

To “sock” means to save money aggressively or to save a large amount of money in a short period of time.

  • For instance, “I’m socking away money to pay off my student loans.”
  • A person discussing their savings strategy might say, “I’m socking away as much as I can to retire early.”
  • Another might suggest, “If you want to achieve your financial goals, you need to sock away a significant portion of your income.”

18. Put by

To “put by” means to set aside or save something for future use or a specific purpose.

  • For example, “I need to put some money by for unexpected expenses.”
  • A person discussing their budget might say, “I always put a little bit by each month for vacations.”
  • Another might advise, “It’s important to put some money by for retirement.”

19. Put up

To “put up” means to save money for a specific purpose or to set aside funds for a particular goal.

  • For instance, “I’m putting up money for a down payment on a house.”
  • A person discussing their financial plans might say, “I’m putting up money each month for my child’s education.”
  • Another might suggest, “If you want to take a dream vacation, start putting up money now.”

20. Put down

To “put down” means to save money regularly or to set aside a portion of your income on a consistent basis.

  • For example, “I try to put down a certain amount of money from each paycheck.”
  • A person discussing their savings habits might say, “I make it a priority to put down money for my future.”
  • Another might advise, “If you want to build wealth, it’s important to put down money consistently.”

21. Put in the bank

This phrase means to save or store money in a bank account. It refers to the act of putting money into a bank for safekeeping or future use.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to put my paycheck in the bank.”
  • A person discussing their financial goals might say, “I want to put more money in the bank this year.”
  • Another might advise, “It’s always a good idea to put some money in the bank for emergencies.”

22. Put in reserve

This phrase means to save or keep something for future use or as a backup. It refers to the act of putting something aside or in reserve for later.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going to put some food in reserve in case of a power outage.”
  • A person discussing their budget might say, “I need to put some money in reserve for unexpected expenses.”
  • Another might advise, “It’s wise to put some time in reserve for relaxation and self-care.”

23. Put in storage

This phrase means to save or keep something in a designated storage space. It refers to the act of putting something away for safekeeping or to free up space.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to put my winter clothes in storage for the summer.”
  • A person discussing decluttering might say, “I’m going to put some items in storage to create more space in my home.”
  • Another might advise, “If you’re not using something regularly, it’s best to put it in storage to keep your living area organized.”

24. Put in the vault

This phrase means to save or protect something in a secure place. It refers to the act of putting something valuable or important in a vault for safekeeping.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going to put my jewelry in the vault while I’m on vacation.”
  • A person discussing document storage might say, “It’s important to put important papers in the vault to prevent loss or damage.”
  • Another might advise, “If you have valuable items, it’s a good idea to put them in the vault for added security.”

25. Salt away

This phrase means to save or store something, often money, in a secret or hidden place. It refers to the act of putting something away in a discreet manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to salt away some cash for a rainy day.”
  • A person discussing saving for a specific goal might say, “I’ve been salting away money each month for a vacation.”
  • Another might advise, “If you want to build up savings, try salting away small amounts regularly.”

26. Store up

This term refers to the act of saving something for future use or consumption. It implies setting aside or stockpiling resources or items for a specific purpose or time.

  • For example, “I like to store up snacks in my desk drawer for when I get hungry in the afternoon.”
  • A person might say, “I need to store up some money before I can go on vacation.”
  • In a conversation about emergency preparedness, someone might advise, “It’s important to store up non-perishable food and water in case of a natural disaster.”

27. Accumulate

This word means to gather or collect things gradually over time, with the intention of saving or amassing a larger quantity.

  • For instance, “I need to accumulate more points before I can redeem them for a reward.”
  • A person might say, “I like to accumulate books on my shelf, even if I haven’t read them all yet.”
  • In a discussion about wealth-building, someone might advise, “To accumulate wealth, it’s important to save and invest consistently over time.”

28. Retain

This term refers to the act of keeping or holding on to something, often with the intention of preserving or saving it for future use.

  • For example, “I like to retain old photos as a way to preserve memories.”
  • A person might say, “I need to retain these documents for legal purposes.”
  • In a conversation about information retention, someone might advise, “To remember important details, it helps to retain key facts and concepts.”

29. Lay up

This phrase means to set aside or save something, typically for a specific purpose or future use.

  • For instance, “I like to lay up some money in a savings account for emergencies.”
  • A person might say, “I need to lay up some supplies before the storm hits.”
  • In a discussion about energy conservation, someone might advise, “To reduce your electricity bill, lay up energy by turning off lights and unplugging unused devices.”

30. Collect

This word means to gather or accumulate things and keep them as a collection or for future use.

  • For example, “I like to collect stamps as a hobby and save them in an album.”
  • A person might say, “I need to collect more data before I can draw any conclusions.”
  • In a conversation about savings goals, someone might advise, “To reach your financial targets, it’s important to collect and save money consistently.”

31. Amass

To gather or collect a large amount of something, typically money or possessions. “Amass” is a slang term for saving a significant sum of money.

  • For example, “He was able to amass a small fortune through careful saving and investing.”
  • A person discussing financial goals might say, “I want to amass enough savings to retire comfortably.”
  • Another might advise, “If you want to amass wealth, you need to start saving early and consistently.”

32. Keep in reserve

To save or keep something for future use or emergencies. “Keep in reserve” implies setting aside money or resources for a specific purpose or unexpected expenses.

  • For instance, “She always keeps some money in reserve for unexpected medical bills.”
  • A person discussing budgeting might say, “It’s important to keep some funds in reserve for emergencies.”
  • Another might advise, “If you want to achieve your financial goals, you need to keep some savings in reserve.”

33. Keep for a rainy day

To save money or resources for a time when they may be needed in the future. “Keep for a rainy day” suggests saving for unexpected expenses or difficult times.

  • For example, “She always puts a portion of her income aside to keep for a rainy day.”
  • A person discussing financial planning might say, “It’s important to keep some funds for a rainy day in case of emergencies.”
  • Another might advise, “You never know when you might need extra money, so it’s always wise to keep some savings for a rainy day.”

34. Put in the piggy bank

To save small amounts of money over time. “Put in the piggy bank” refers to the practice of saving loose change or small bills in a piggy bank or other container.

  • For instance, “Instead of spending all your spare change, put it in the piggy bank and watch your savings grow.”
  • A person discussing budgeting might say, “Even saving small amounts can add up over time, so put any extra change in the piggy bank.”
  • Another might advise, “Teach children the value of saving by encouraging them to put their pocket money in a piggy bank.”

35. Sock it away

To save or store money in a secure or hidden place. “Sock it away” implies saving money in a way that is not easily accessible for spending.

  • For example, “He always socks away a portion of his paycheck in a separate savings account.”
  • A person discussing financial discipline might say, “If you want to achieve your savings goals, you need to sock away a portion of your income.”
  • Another might advise, “Create a budget and make sure to sock away some money every month for your future needs.”

36. Salve

This term is often used as a greeting or a way to say hello. It can also be used to express goodwill or well wishes.

  • For instance, instead of saying “hello,” someone might say “salve” to greet another person.
  • In ancient Rome, people would say “salve” as a form of greeting.
  • A person might say “salve” to express their good wishes for someone’s well-being.
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