Top 52 Slang For Not Care – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing a lack of interest or concern, language can be a powerful tool. From casual conversations to social media posts, knowing the right slang for not care can make all the difference. Let’s explore some of the trendiest and most effective phrases that convey this sentiment effortlessly. Stay tuned to level up your communication game and show the world just how unbothered you can be!

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1. DGAF

This acronym stands for “Don’t Give a F***” and is used to express a complete lack of concern or interest in something. It’s a way to convey indifference or apathy.

  • For example, someone might say, “I DGAF about what other people think of me.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might comment, “I DGAF about politics. It’s all a mess.”
  • A teenager might use this slang to dismiss their parents’ rules, saying, “I DGAF about curfew. I’ll do what I want.”

2. IDGAF

Similar to DGAF, this acronym stands for “I Don’t Give a F***” and is used to express a complete lack of care or concern. It’s a more explicit way of conveying indifference.

  • For instance, someone might say, “IDGAF about your opinion. I’ll do what I want.”
  • In a conversation about a trivial matter, a person might respond, “IDGAF, it’s not important.”
  • A frustrated individual might exclaim, “IDGAF about your excuses. Just get the job done!”

3. IDC

This acronym stands for “I Don’t Care” and is used to express a lack of interest or concern. It’s a straightforward way of indicating indifference.

  • For example, someone might say, “IDC what we have for dinner. I’m not picky.”
  • In a discussion about weekend plans, a person might respond, “IDC, I’m up for anything.”
  • A teenager might use this slang to dismiss their friend’s gossip, saying, “IDC about who’s dating who. It’s not my business.”

4. Whatever

This word is commonly used to convey a lack of interest, concern, or regard for something. It can also be used to dismiss or brush off a topic or comment.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Whatever, it doesn’t matter to me.”
  • In a conversation about a trivial matter, a person might respond, “Whatever, it’s not worth arguing about.”
  • A teenager might use this slang to respond to their parent’s nagging, saying, “Whatever, I’ll clean my room later.”

5. Meh

This word is often used to express a lack of enthusiasm or interest in something. It’s a way to indicate a nonchalant or indifferent attitude.

  • For example, someone might say, “I saw the movie, and it was just meh.”
  • In a discussion about a new restaurant, a person might comment, “The food was meh, nothing special.”
  • A teenager might use this slang to describe their feelings about a school assignment, saying, “The project is meh, I’m not excited about it.”

6. Couldn’t care less

This phrase is used to express complete disinterest or lack of concern about something. It implies that the person’s level of care cannot be any lower.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you hear about the new celebrity scandal?” a person might respond, “Couldn’t care less. I’m not into celebrity gossip.”
  • In a conversation about politics, someone might say, “I couldn’t care less about who wins the election. It doesn’t affect me.”
  • If a friend suggests watching a movie that you have no interest in, you could reply, “Sorry, couldn’t care less about that genre.”

7. Not my problem

This phrase is used to indicate that a particular issue or situation does not affect or concern the person speaking. It suggests a lack of personal responsibility or involvement.

  • For instance, if someone complains about their car breaking down, you might respond, “Not my problem. You should have taken better care of it.”
  • In a group project, if someone fails to complete their assigned task, another person might say, “Their lack of contribution is not my problem. I did my part.”
  • If someone tries to involve you in a disagreement between two friends, you could say, “Sorry, but that’s not my problem. They need to work it out themselves.”

8. Indifferent

This term describes a state of neutrality or lack of interest in a particular matter. It suggests that the person does not have a strong preference or emotional investment.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you prefer tea or coffee?” and you have no preference, you could respond, “I’m indifferent. Either one is fine.”
  • In a discussion about fashion trends, someone might say, “I’m indifferent to the latest styles. I just wear what’s comfortable.”
  • If a friend asks for your opinion on a movie you haven’t seen, you could say, “I’m indifferent. I haven’t heard much about it.”

9. Don’t mind

This phrase is used to indicate that the person is open to or accepting of a particular suggestion or request. It suggests a lack of objection or opposition.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you mind if I borrow your pen?” and you have no problem with it, you could respond, “I don’t mind.”
  • In a conversation about dinner options, someone might say, “I don’t mind where we eat. I’m not picky.”
  • If a coworker asks if you mind switching shifts, you could say, “I don’t mind. I can be flexible.”

10. Nonchalant

This term describes a relaxed and casual attitude towards a particular situation or event. It suggests a lack of excitement or strong emotional response.

  • For example, if someone shares exciting news and you respond with a calm demeanor, they might say, “Wow, you’re so nonchalant about it.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult challenge, someone might say, “I’m trying to stay nonchalant and not let it stress me out.”
  • If a friend cancels plans last minute and you don’t mind, you could say, “I’m nonchalant about it. We can reschedule.”

11. Unconcerned

When someone is unconcerned, they show a lack of interest or care towards a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you hear about the new rules at work?” and you respond with, “I’m unconcerned about it,” you are indicating that you are not bothered by or interested in the new rules.
  • When discussing a controversial issue, someone might say, “I’m unconcerned with what other people think. I’ll stick to my own beliefs.”
  • If a friend is worried about a minor issue, you might say, “Don’t be unconcerned about it. It’s not a big deal.”

12. Apathetic

Apathetic describes a lack of interest, enthusiasm, or concern towards a particular subject or situation.

  • For instance, if someone expresses their excitement about a new movie release and you respond with, “I’m apathetic towards it,” you are indicating that you have no interest or enthusiasm for the movie.
  • When discussing politics, someone might say, “Many young voters are apathetic and feel disconnected from the political process.”
  • If a friend is complaining about a minor inconvenience, you might say, “I understand you’re frustrated, but try not to be apathetic about it. It’s not worth getting worked up over.”

13. NBD

NBD is an abbreviation for “no big deal” and is often used to indicate that something is not significant or important.

  • For example, if someone apologizes for a small mistake and you respond with, “NBD,” you are telling them that their mistake is not a big deal.
  • When someone cancels plans last minute, you might say, “NBD, we can reschedule for another time.”
  • If a friend is stressing about a minor issue, you could say, “Don’t worry, it’s NBD. Everything will work out fine.”

14. So what?

The phrase “so what?” is used to express indifference or disregard towards a particular matter or situation.

  • For instance, if someone tries to provoke you with a comment and you respond with, “So what?” you are indicating that their comment does not affect you or bother you.
  • When discussing a minor inconvenience, someone might say, “Yeah, it’s annoying, but so what? It’s not a big deal.”
  • If a friend is upset about a trivial matter, you might say, “Just ignore it and say ‘so what?’ It’s not worth your energy.”

15. Who cares?

The phrase “who cares?” is used to express a lack of interest or concern towards a particular matter or situation.

  • For example, if someone is complaining about a minor issue and you respond with, “Who cares?” you are indicating that you do not consider the issue important.
  • When discussing a trivial gossip story, someone might say, “Honestly, who cares? It’s not like it affects our lives.”
  • If a friend is stressing about a minor detail, you could say, “Don’t worry about it. Who cares? It’s not worth getting worked up over.”

16. It’s all good

This phrase is used to indicate that everything is fine or okay. It is often used to express that there is no need to worry or be concerned about a particular situation.

  • For example, if someone apologizes for a mistake, you might respond, “It’s all good, don’t worry about it.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I can’t make it to the party tonight.” The other person might reply, “No problem, it’s all good.”
  • If someone asks if you’re upset about something, you could say, “Nah, it’s all good. I’m not bothered.”

17. I’m chill

This phrase is used to convey that you are calm, laid-back, and not easily bothered or stressed. It implies a state of tranquility and contentment.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you’re worried about a deadline, you might respond, “Nah, I’m chill. I’ll get it done.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “We can go wherever you want, I’m chill with anything.”
  • If someone comments on your calm demeanor during a chaotic situation, you could say, “I’m just naturally chill, nothing really phases me.”

18. I’m cool

This phrase is used to express that you are okay or satisfied with a particular situation or decision. It implies a lack of concern or objection.

  • For example, if someone suggests going to a certain restaurant, you might respond, “Yeah, I’m cool with that.”
  • In a discussion about plans, someone might ask if you’re okay with a specific time, and you could reply, “I’m cool, that works for me.”
  • If someone offers you a different option and asks if you’re okay with it, you could say, “Yeah, I’m cool. I don’t mind.”

19. It’s whatever

This phrase is used to convey a lack of interest or concern about a situation or decision. It implies a sense of indifference or nonchalance.

  • For instance, if someone asks where you want to eat, and you have no preference, you might say, “It’s whatever, you decide.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might suggest different options, and you could respond, “Eh, it’s whatever. I’m open to anything.”
  • If someone asks if you have any strong opinions on a topic, you could say, “Not really, it’s whatever. I don’t care either way.”

20. I’m laid back

This phrase is used to describe someone who is relaxed, flexible, and not easily stressed or bothered. It implies a carefree and adaptable nature.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’re okay with a change in plans, you might respond, “Yeah, I’m laid back. It doesn’t bother me.”
  • In a conversation about preferences, someone might ask if you have any specific requirements, and you could say, “Nope, I’m laid back. I can go with the flow.”
  • If someone comments on your ability to handle unexpected situations, you could say, “I’m just naturally laid back. I don’t let things get to me.”

21. I’m easy

This phrase is used to express that you are not easily upset or bothered by something. It implies a laid-back and carefree attitude.

  • For example, if someone suggests going out for dinner and asks where you would like to go, you might respond, “I’m easy, I’ll eat anywhere.”
  • In a group discussion about weekend plans, you might say, “I’m easy, I’m up for anything.”
  • If someone asks for your preference between two options, you might reply, “I’m easy, either one works for me.”

22. I’m relaxed

This phrase indicates that you are in a state of relaxation and not easily stressed or worried about something.

  • For instance, if someone asks about your upcoming presentation, you might say, “I’m relaxed about it, I’ve prepared well.”
  • In a conversation about a stressful situation, you might comment, “I’m relaxed, there’s no point in getting worked up.”
  • If someone expresses concern about your well-being, you might reassure them by saying, “I’m relaxed, everything is under control.”

23. I’m indifferent

This phrase suggests that you have no strong feelings or preferences about a particular matter and are therefore not invested in the outcome.

  • For example, if someone asks if you prefer coffee or tea, you might respond, “I’m indifferent, I’ll drink either.”
  • In a discussion about which movie to watch, you might say, “I’m indifferent, I don’t mind either choice.”
  • If someone asks for your opinion on a controversial topic, you might reply, “I’m indifferent, it doesn’t affect me personally.”

24. I’m nonchalant

This phrase indicates a casual and relaxed attitude towards something, often accompanied by a sense of indifference or detachment.

  • For instance, if someone tells you about a minor inconvenience they experienced, you might respond, “I’m nonchalant, it’s no big deal.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, you might comment, “I’m nonchalant, I’ll figure it out.”
  • If someone expresses worry about a problem, you might reassure them by saying, “I’m nonchalant, I’m sure it will work itself out.”

25. I’m apathetic

This phrase conveys a lack of interest, enthusiasm, or concern about a particular issue or topic.

  • For example, if someone asks for your opinion on a political matter, you might respond, “I’m apathetic, I don’t follow politics.”
  • In a discussion about a social cause, you might say, “I’m apathetic, it doesn’t resonate with me.”
  • If someone expresses excitement about an upcoming event, you might reply, “I’m apathetic, it’s not really my thing.”

26. Don’t give a damn

This phrase is used to express a complete lack of interest or concern about something.

  • For example, “I don’t give a damn about what people think of me.”
  • Someone might say, “He failed the test? Well, I don’t give a damn.”
  • Another might declare, “I’m going to do what I want and not give a damn about the consequences.”

27. Zero f***s given

This phrase is used to convey a complete lack of care or concern about a situation or outcome.

  • For instance, “He got fired? Zero f***s given.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m going to wear this outfit even if nobody likes it. Zero f***s given.”
  • Another might declare, “I’m going to speak my mind and not worry about what others think. Zero f***s given.”

28. I’m chillin’

This phrase is used to indicate a state of being relaxed and not bothered by anything.

  • For example, “I don’t have any plans tonight, so I’m just chillin’.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m just chillin’ at home, watching TV.”
  • Another might declare, “I don’t feel like going out tonight. I’m just chillin’.”

29. I’m good

This phrase is used to convey that one is content and not bothered by a situation.

  • For instance, “Do you need any help?” “No, thanks, I’m good.”
  • Someone might say, “I don’t want any dessert. I’m good.”
  • Another might declare, “I don’t need your advice. I’m good on my own.”

30. It is what it is

This phrase is used to express acceptance of a situation, often implying that there is no need to worry or try to change it.

  • For example, “I didn’t get the job. Oh well, it is what it is.”
  • Someone might say, “The weather is terrible today, but it is what it is.”
  • Another might declare, “I can’t change the past. It is what it is.”

31. Ain’t nobody got time for that

This phrase is used to express disinterest or a lack of concern for a particular situation or topic. It implies that the speaker is too busy or uninterested to pay attention or invest energy in the matter at hand.

  • For example, if someone suggests going to a party, a person might respond, “Ain’t nobody got time for that.”
  • In a conversation about a trivial issue, one might say, “I have more important things to worry about. Ain’t nobody got time for that.”
  • When someone brings up a gossip or drama, a person could dismissively say, “Yeah, yeah, ain’t nobody got time for that.”

32. I’m unbothered

This phrase is used to convey a lack of concern or indifference towards a situation or someone’s actions. It suggests that the speaker is not affected or bothered by the situation or person in question.

  • For instance, if someone tries to provoke a reaction, a person might respond, “I’m unbothered.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s negative opinion, one might say, “Their criticism doesn’t affect me. I’m unbothered.”
  • When someone tries to involve you in unnecessary drama, you could calmly say, “I’m unbothered by all of this.”

33. I’m detached

This phrase is used to express a lack of emotional investment or attachment to a situation or person. It implies that the speaker is not affected or concerned about the emotional aspects of the situation or relationship.

  • For example, if someone shares their personal problems, a person might respond, “I’m detached from all of that.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult decision, one might say, “I try to approach things with a detached mindset.”
  • When someone expects an emotional reaction, you could explain, “I’m naturally more detached when it comes to emotional situations.”

34. I’m aloof

This phrase is used to describe someone who is emotionally distant or indifferent towards others. It suggests that the speaker is detached and uninterested in forming close connections or engaging in social interactions.

  • For instance, if someone tries to engage in small talk, a person might respond, “I’m aloof.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s reserved behavior, one might say, “They come across as aloof and unapproachable.”
  • When someone questions your lack of enthusiasm, you could simply state, “I’m naturally aloof and prefer to keep to myself.”

35. I’m unconcerned

This phrase is used to convey a lack of worry or interest in a particular situation or outcome. It implies that the speaker is not affected by or invested in the matter at hand.

  • For example, if someone expresses concern about a problem, a person might respond, “I’m unconcerned.”
  • In a conversation about potential consequences, one might say, “I’m unconcerned about the outcome.”
  • When someone tries to involve you in unnecessary drama, you could calmly say, “I’m unconcerned with all of this.”

36. I’m disinterested

This phrase is used to indicate a lack of interest or concern about something.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to go to a party and you’re not interested, you might say, “I’m disinterested in going.”
  • In a conversation about a boring topic, you could say, “I’m disinterested in the details.”
  • If someone is trying to convince you to join a club or organization, you might respond with, “I’m disinterested in joining.”

37. I’m blasé

When someone says they’re blasé, they mean they are unimpressed or indifferent about something.

  • For instance, if someone shows you a new gadget and you’re not impressed, you might say, “I’m blasé about it.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “I’m blasé about the latest trends.”
  • If someone asks if you’re excited about a new movie release and you’re not, you could say, “I’m blasé about it.”

38. I’m easygoing

When someone says they’re easygoing, it means they are relaxed and laid-back. It can also imply that they are not easily bothered or stressed.

  • For example, if someone suggests changing plans and you’re fine with it, you might say, “I’m easygoing about it.”
  • In a discussion about work environments, someone might say, “I prefer an easygoing atmosphere.”
  • If someone asks how you handle stressful situations, you could respond with, “I’m easygoing, so I don’t let things bother me too much.”

39. I’m mellow

When someone says they’re mellow, it means they are calm and relaxed. It can also imply a lack of enthusiasm or energy.

  • For instance, if someone asks how you’re feeling, and you’re feeling calm, you might say, “I’m mellow.”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might say, “I prefer a mellow evening at home.”
  • If someone asks how you handle conflicts, you could respond with, “I’m mellow, so I try to stay calm and find a peaceful resolution.”

40. Don’t give a rat’s ass

This phrase is a more vulgar way of saying “I don’t care at all.” It expresses a complete lack of interest or concern.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to go to a concert and you have no interest, you might say, “I don’t give a rat’s ass.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “I don’t give a rat’s ass about any of it.”
  • If someone asks for your opinion on a trivial matter, you could respond with, “I don’t give a rat’s ass, do whatever you want.”

41. Not my circus, not my monkeys

This phrase is used to convey that the speaker does not want to be involved in a particular situation or issue. It suggests that the speaker has no personal stake or interest in the matter.

  • For example, if someone asks for help with a problem that doesn’t concern you, you might say, “Sorry, not my circus, not my monkeys.”
  • In a discussion about office politics, someone might comment, “I try to stay out of it. Not my circus, not my monkeys.”
  • When faced with a situation that you don’t want to be involved in, you could simply say, “Not my circus, not my monkeys.”

42. I’m over it

This phrase is used to express that the speaker has moved on from a particular situation or issue and no longer has any emotional attachment or investment in it.

  • For instance, if someone brings up a past argument that you have resolved, you might say, “I’m over it.”
  • When discussing a breakup, someone might say, “It was tough at first, but now I’m over it.”
  • If someone continues to complain about a minor inconvenience, you could respond with, “Come on, it’s not a big deal. Just get over it.”

43. I’m unfazed

This phrase is used to indicate that the speaker remains calm and unaffected by a situation or event that might typically cause distress or concern.

  • For example, if someone tries to provoke you with insults, you might respond with, “I’m unfazed.”
  • When faced with a challenging task, someone might say, “I’ve been through worse. I’m unfazed.”
  • If someone tries to intimidate you, you could confidently state, “Your threats don’t bother me. I’m unfazed.”

44. I’m heedless

This phrase is used to convey that the speaker is intentionally ignoring or disregarding something, usually because they do not consider it to be significant or worthy of their attention.

  • For instance, if someone tries to warn you about a potential danger that you consider irrelevant, you might respond with, “I’m heedless.”
  • When someone gives unsolicited advice that you have no interest in following, you could say, “Thanks, but I’m heedless.”
  • If someone tries to involve you in a trivial matter, you could dismiss it by saying, “I’m heedless of that.”

45. I’m impassive

This phrase is used to indicate that the speaker is deliberately not displaying any emotion or reaction to a particular situation or event.

  • For example, if someone shares bad news with you and you choose not to show any outward signs of distress, you might say, “I’m impassive.”
  • When faced with a challenging situation, someone might adopt an impassive demeanor to avoid showing vulnerability.
  • If someone tries to provoke a reaction from you, you could respond with, “I’m impassive. Your words don’t affect me.”

46. I’m insouciant

This phrase is a way of expressing indifference or a lack of concern. It suggests that the person is carefree and unconcerned about the situation or issue at hand.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m insouciant about what others think of me.”
  • In a conversation about a trivial matter, a person might dismissively say, “I’m insouciant about which movie we watch.”
  • Another might respond to a friend’s complaint with, “I’m insouciant about your problems.”

47. I’m phlegmatic

This statement suggests that the person remains calm and composed in the face of adversity or negative emotions. It implies that they are not easily disturbed or affected by external circumstances.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m phlegmatic about the outcome of the exam.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging situation, a person might assert, “I’m phlegmatic about dealing with difficult people.”
  • Another might respond to a friend’s dramatic story with, “I’m phlegmatic about your constant drama.”

48. I’m stoic

This phrase indicates that the person is not displaying or experiencing any strong emotions. It suggests a state of calmness and self-control, even in the face of challenging or distressing situations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m stoic in the face of adversity.”
  • In a conversation about personal struggles, a person might assert, “I’m stoic about my past mistakes.”
  • Another might respond to a friend’s emotional outburst with, “I’m stoic about your constant drama.”

49. I’m unresponsive

This statement suggests a lack of interest or concern. It implies that the person is not responsive or engaged in the situation or conversation, indicating a lack of care or attention.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m unresponsive to their demands.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might assert, “I’m unresponsive to your attempts to change my mind.”
  • Another might respond to a friend’s excitement with, “I’m unresponsive to your enthusiasm.”

50. I’m untroubled

This phrase suggests a state of being without worry or concern. It indicates that the person is not troubled or bothered by the situation or issue at hand, conveying a sense of ease and tranquility.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m untroubled by their criticism.”
  • In a conversation about potential risks, a person might assert, “I’m untroubled by the potential consequences.”
  • Another might respond to a friend’s anxiety with, “I’m untroubled by your worries.”

51. I’m uninterested

This phrase is used to express a lack of interest or concern about something. It implies a disinterest or indifference towards a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, if someone suggests watching a movie that doesn’t appeal to you, you might say, “I’m uninterested in that film.”
  • In a conversation about a political debate, you might respond, “I’m uninterested in politics, so I didn’t watch it.”
  • If someone asks for your opinion on a new fashion trend, you could reply, “I’m uninterested in fashion, so I don’t have an opinion.”

52. I’m uninvolved

This phrase indicates a lack of involvement or concern about a specific matter. It suggests that the person doesn’t feel the need to be part of or engaged in the situation.

  • For instance, if someone is gossiping about a coworker’s personal life, you might say, “I’m uninvolved and don’t want to be part of the drama.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial issue, you could express, “I’m uninvolved, so I don’t have a strong opinion either way.”
  • If someone asks for your help with a project that doesn’t interest you, you might respond, “I’m uninvolved in that area and can’t assist.”
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