Top 47 Slang For Opioids – Meaning & Usage

Opioid abuse is a serious issue that affects communities worldwide. To shed light on this topic, we’ve compiled a list of slang terms for opioids that are commonly used on the streets. By understanding these terms, we hope to create awareness and empower individuals to recognize the signs of opioid abuse. Join us as we delve into this important subject and equip ourselves with the knowledge to make a difference.

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1. Oxy

Oxy is a slang term for oxycodone, which is a powerful opioid pain medication. It is commonly prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Oxy is often used illicitly for its euphoric effects.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t find any Oxy on the street right now.”
  • In a discussion about opioid addiction, a person might share, “I started taking Oxy after a surgery and quickly became dependent.”
  • A news article might report, “The illegal sale and abuse of Oxy has become a major problem in many communities.”

2. Roxy

Roxy is a slang term for roxicodone, which is a brand name for the opioid pain medication oxycodone. It is similar to OxyContin but comes in a different dosage form. Roxy is often used illicitly for its euphoric effects.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “Do you know where I can find any Roxy?”
  • In a discussion about opioid abuse, a person might share, “I started taking Roxy recreationally and it quickly spiraled out of control.”
  • A recovery blog might warn, “The street name ‘Roxy’ is a red flag for potential opioid addiction.”

3. Percs

Percs is a slang term for Percocet, which is a combination medication containing oxycodone and acetaminophen. It is commonly prescribed for the management of moderate to severe pain. Percs are often used recreationally for their euphoric effects.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to refill my Percs prescription.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of opioid misuse, a person might share, “I started abusing Percs after a car accident and it nearly ruined my life.”
  • A medical article might state, “Percs are a commonly diverted prescription medication, contributing to the opioid epidemic.”

4. Vikes

Vikes is a slang term for Vicodin, which is a brand name for the combination medication hydrocodone and acetaminophen. It is prescribed for the management of moderate to severe pain. Vikes are often used recreationally for their euphoric effects.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “Do you have any Vikes?”
  • In a discussion about the risks of opioid addiction, a person might share, “I started taking Vikes to cope with emotional pain and it only made things worse.”
  • A substance abuse counselor might advise, “If you’re struggling with Vikes addiction, seek professional help as soon as possible.”

5. Blues

Blues is a slang term for blueberry-flavored oxycodone tablets. These tablets are often illegally manufactured and sold on the black market. Blues are used recreationally for their euphoric effects.

  • For example, someone might say, “I prefer the blues over other forms of oxycodone.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of counterfeit medications, a person might share, “I unknowingly bought blues on the street and ended up in the emergency room.”
  • A law enforcement officer might warn, “Be cautious of anyone selling blues without a legitimate prescription, as they may be counterfeit and dangerous.”

6. Hillbilly Heroin

This term refers to the prescription opioid painkiller OxyContin. It gained popularity in rural areas of the United States where opioid abuse was prevalent, hence the association with “hillbilly.”

  • For example, a news article might warn about the dangers of “hillbilly heroin” and its potential for addiction.
  • In a conversation about the opioid crisis, someone might say, “Hillbilly heroin is destroying communities.”
  • A person discussing the impact of opioids might mention, “Hillbilly heroin is a powerful and addictive drug.”

7. Beans

This slang term refers to the opioid painkiller Oxycodone. The term “beans” may be used to discreetly refer to the drug in certain contexts.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to refill my prescription for beans.”
  • In a discussion about the misuse of prescription drugs, someone might mention, “People sometimes sell beans on the street for a high price.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I started abusing beans after a surgery and it quickly spiraled out of control.”

8. Tram

This term refers to the opioid painkiller Tramadol. It is often used as a slang term to refer to the drug in informal conversations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I took a couple of trams to help with my back pain.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of opioid addiction, someone might mention, “Tram is a commonly abused prescription drug.”
  • A person sharing their struggle with opioid dependence might say, “I started using trams recreationally and it quickly became a problem.”

9. Lean

This term refers to a recreational drug mixture that includes a prescription-strength cough syrup containing codeine and promethazine, along with a carbonated soft drink and often a candy. “Lean” is a slang term often used to refer to this concoction.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m sipping on some lean to relax.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of abusing cough syrup, someone might mention, “Lean can be highly addictive and harmful.”
  • A person sharing their experience with recreational drug use might say, “I started experimenting with lean at parties, but it quickly became a problem.”

10. Juice

This term refers to the synthetic opioid painkiller Fentanyl. It is often used as a slang term to refer to the drug in certain contexts.

  • For example, someone might say, “I got some juice to help with my chronic pain.”
  • In a discussion about the rise in opioid-related overdoses, someone might mention, “Juice is a potent and dangerous opioid.”
  • A person sharing their struggle with addiction might say, “I never thought I would become dependent on juice, but it happened.”

11. Tuss

Tuss is a slang term for hydrocodone, which is a semi-synthetic opioid pain medication. Hydrocodone is commonly prescribed to relieve moderate to severe pain. Tuss is often used to refer to hydrocodone syrup, which is sometimes mixed with other ingredients like promethazine to create a recreational drug known as “purple drank” or “lean”.

  • For example, a person might say, “I scored some tuss from my friend’s medicine cabinet.”
  • In a discussion about opioid abuse, someone might mention, “Tuss is often abused recreationally, especially in certain subcultures.”
  • A warning about the dangers of tuss might be, “Misusing tuss can lead to addiction and serious health consequences.”

12. Dillies

Dillies is a slang term for hydromorphone, which is a potent opioid analgesic medication. Hydromorphone is commonly used to treat severe pain, such as that experienced by cancer patients. Dillies are often referred to as a highly potent and sought-after opioid, known for its euphoric effects.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I managed to get my hands on some dillies for a wild weekend.”
  • In a discussion about opioid addiction, someone might mention, “Dillies are considered a high-risk opioid due to their potency.”
  • A cautionary statement about the dangers of dillies might be, “Using dillies without a prescription can lead to overdose and even death.”

13. Norco

Norco is a brand name for a combination medication containing hydrocodone and acetaminophen. Hydrocodone is an opioid pain medication, while acetaminophen is a non-opioid pain reliever and fever reducer. Norco is commonly prescribed for the relief of moderate to severe pain.

  • For example, someone might say, “I was prescribed Norco after my dental surgery.”
  • In a discussion about opioid abuse, someone might mention, “Norco is often misused and diverted for recreational purposes.”
  • A warning about the potential side effects of Norco might be, “Taking Norco can cause drowsiness, dizziness, and respiratory depression.”

14. Fentanyl

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid medication that is significantly more potent than morphine. It is commonly used to treat severe pain, especially in cases where other opioids are not effective. Fentanyl is also sometimes illegally manufactured and sold on the black market, often mixed with other drugs or disguised as other substances.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Fentanyl is a highly dangerous opioid that has caused numerous overdose deaths.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “Fentanyl is a major contributing factor to the increase in opioid-related deaths.”
  • A warning about the potency of fentanyl might be, “Even a small amount of fentanyl can be lethal, and it is important to exercise extreme caution when handling or using this drug.”

15. H

H is a slang term for heroin, which is an illegal opioid drug derived from morphine. Heroin is typically sold as a white or brown powder, or as a sticky black substance known as “black tar heroin”. It can be injected, smoked, or snorted. Heroin is highly addictive and can have devastating effects on a person’s health and well-being.

  • For example, someone might say, “He got hooked on H after experimenting with prescription opioids.”
  • In a discussion about substance abuse, someone might mention, “H is one of the most dangerous and addictive drugs out there.”
  • A cautionary statement about the risks of using H might be, “Using H puts you at risk of overdose, infectious diseases, and other severe health complications.”

16. Smack

Smack is a slang term commonly used to refer to heroin, a highly addictive opioid drug derived from morphine. It is typically sold as a white or brown powder or as a sticky black substance known as black tar heroin.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I need to score some smack to get through the day.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “Smack is one of the most dangerous and deadly drugs out there.”
  • A news article might describe a drug bust, stating, “Police seized a large quantity of smack during the raid.”

17. China White

China White is a slang term often used to refer to fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is significantly more potent than heroin. It is usually sold as a white powder and is responsible for a large number of overdose deaths.

  • For instance, a drug dealer might advertise, “I’ve got some high-quality China White for sale.”
  • In a news report on the opioid crisis, a journalist might say, “China White is flooding the streets, causing an alarming number of fatalities.”
  • A recovering addict might share their experience, saying, “I was hooked on China White for years before I finally got clean.”

18. Black Tar

Black Tar is a slang term specifically used to describe a form of heroin that is dark and sticky, resembling black tar. It is typically produced in Mexico and is less refined than other forms of heroin.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I prefer black tar because it’s cheaper and easier to find.”
  • In a documentary about drug addiction, a person might describe their first encounter with black tar, saying, “I didn’t realize how dangerous black tar heroin was until it was too late.”
  • A law enforcement officer might discuss the challenges of combating black tar heroin, stating, “Its sticky consistency makes it difficult to handle and package during seizures.”

19. White Horse

White Horse is a slang term often used to refer to pure heroin, which is a highly potent and dangerous form of the drug. It is typically sold as a white powder and is known for its purity and strength.

  • For instance, a drug user might say, “I got my hands on some white horse, and it’s the strongest stuff I’ve ever tried.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of heroin, a counselor might warn, “White horse is incredibly potent and can easily lead to overdose.”
  • A recovering addict might share their story, saying, “I started with white horse, thinking it was a one-time thing, but it quickly took over my life.”

20. Brown Sugar

Brown Sugar is a slang term commonly used to refer to heroin, a highly addictive opioid drug derived from morphine. It is typically sold as a brown powder and is known for its euphoric and pain-relieving effects.

  • For example, a drug dealer might advertise, “I’ve got some high-quality brown sugar for sale.”
  • In a news report on drug overdoses, a journalist might mention, “Brown sugar is one of the most commonly abused opioids.”
  • A recovering addict might describe their struggle with brown sugar, saying, “I was addicted to brown sugar for years before I finally sought help.”

21. Dope

This term is commonly used to refer to heroin, a powerful opioid drug derived from morphine. It can also be used more broadly to refer to any illicit drug or substance of abuse.

  • For example, “He got arrested for selling dope on the street.”
  • In a discussion about drug addiction, someone might say, “Heroin is a dangerous and highly addictive form of dope.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I used to be hooked on dope, but I’ve been clean for two years now.”

22. Skag

This term specifically refers to low-quality heroin that is often cut or adulterated with other substances. It is generally used in a negative context to describe a poor-quality opioid drug.

  • For instance, “He bought some skag off the street and ended up getting sick.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of drug use, someone might warn, “Watch out for skag, it’s often laced with harmful additives.”
  • A person discussing the opioid crisis might mention, “The prevalence of skag on the streets is a major concern for public health.”

23. Junk

This term is another slang word for heroin, a potent opioid drug. It is often used in a derogatory or disapproving manner to emphasize the negative effects and dangers of the drug.

  • For example, “He’s been struggling with his addiction to junk for years.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, someone might say, “We need to provide better support for those trapped in the cycle of junk addiction.”
  • A person sharing their recovery journey might say, “I hit rock bottom when I realized my life was controlled by junk.”

24. Snow

While “snow” can refer to cocaine, it is also used to describe a mixture of cocaine and heroin, commonly known as a speedball. In the context of opioids, “snow” may be used to refer to a combination of opioids and stimulant drugs.

  • For instance, “He was caught with a bag of snow, a dangerous mix of cocaine and heroin.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Speedballs, also known as snowballs, can be extremely risky due to the combination of opioids and stimulants.”
  • A person discussing the effects of opioids might say, “Mixing snow with other drugs can lead to unpredictable and potentially fatal outcomes.”

25. Speedball

A speedball is a mixture of opioids, such as heroin or morphine, and stimulant drugs, such as cocaine or amphetamines. This combination produces a unique and dangerous effect, as the sedating properties of opioids counteract the stimulating effects of stimulants.

  • For example, “He overdosed on a speedball, a lethal combination of heroin and cocaine.”
  • In a discussion about the risks of drug use, someone might say, “Speedballs can put immense strain on the heart and respiratory system.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I used to chase the high of a speedball, but it nearly cost me my life.”

26. Tango and Cash

This slang term refers to a combination of heroin and cocaine, which are often mixed together and injected. The name “Tango and Cash” is a reference to the 1989 action-comedy film of the same name, which features two law enforcement officers with contrasting personalities.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I scored some Tango and Cash last night.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried Tango and Cash?”
  • A news article might mention, “Law enforcement seized a large quantity of Tango and Cash during a drug bust.”

27. Apache

This term is used to refer to the powerful synthetic opioid called fentanyl. “Apache” is a street name for fentanyl, which is much stronger than morphine and can be fatal in small doses.

  • For instance, a drug dealer might advertise, “I’ve got some Apache for sale.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “Apache is responsible for a significant number of overdose deaths.”
  • A news headline might read, “Authorities seize Apache worth millions in a major drug bust.”

28. Apache Leap

This slang term is used to refer to heroin, a highly addictive opioid drug. “Apache Leap” is a specific reference to a geographical location in Arizona, known for a legendary Native American leap from a mountain to escape pursuing Apache warriors.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “I need to score some Apache Leap.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might mention, “The rise in Apache Leap abuse is concerning.”
  • A news report might state, “Authorities discovered a stash of Apache Leap during a raid on a drug den.”

29. Apache Tears

This slang term refers to the prescription painkiller oxycodone. “Apache Tears” is a euphemism for the drug, which is derived from the opium poppy plant and is highly addictive.

  • For instance, a drug user might say, “I’m running low on Apache Tears.”
  • In a discussion about opioid abuse, someone might mention, “Many people become addicted to Apache Tears after being prescribed pain medication.”
  • A news article might report, “The illegal sale of Apache Tears is a growing problem in the community.”

30. Apache Red

This slang term is used to refer to heroin, a powerful and illegal opioid drug. “Apache Red” is a specific term that may be used in certain communities or drug circles to refer to heroin.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “Do you know where I can find some Apache Red?”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might mention, “Apache Red has devastating effects on individuals and communities.”
  • A news report might state, “Law enforcement seized a significant amount of Apache Red during a drug raid.”

31. Apache Gold

This slang term refers to fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid that is similar to morphine but is 50 to 100 times more potent. Fentanyl is often mixed with other drugs, such as heroin or cocaine, to increase their potency.

  • For example, a user might say, “I can get some Apache Gold if you’re looking for a strong high.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of opioids, someone might warn, “Watch out for drugs laced with Apache Gold, it’s extremely potent.”
  • Another might say, “Apache Gold is responsible for a significant number of overdose deaths.”

32. Apache Dust

This slang term refers to heroin, an illegal opioid drug that is derived from morphine. Heroin is typically sold as a white or brown powder or as a sticky black substance known as black tar heroin.

  • For instance, a user might say, “I need to score some Apache Dust to get through the day.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid epidemic, someone might mention, “Apache Dust is highly addictive and can lead to devastating consequences.”
  • Another might warn, “Using Apache Dust is extremely dangerous and can result in overdose or death.”

33. Apache Sunrise

This slang term refers to oxycodone, a powerful prescription opioid medication that is used to manage moderate to severe pain. Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid that is similar to codeine and morphine.

  • For example, a user might say, “I can get some Apache Sunrise if you’re in need of pain relief.”
  • In a discussion about the misuse of prescription drugs, someone might mention, “Apache Sunrise is a commonly abused opioid.”
  • Another might warn, “Using Apache Sunrise without a prescription can lead to addiction and other serious health problems.”

34. Boy

This slang term refers to heroin, an illegal opioid drug that is derived from morphine. Heroin is typically sold as a white or brown powder or as a sticky black substance known as black tar heroin.

  • For instance, a user might say, “I’m going to pick up some boy later tonight.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of heroin, someone might mention, “Boy is a highly addictive drug that can ruin lives.”
  • Another might warn, “Using boy can lead to overdose and other health complications.”

35. White girl

This slang term refers to cocaine, a powerful stimulant drug that is derived from the coca plant. Cocaine is typically sold as a white powder and is commonly snorted, but it can also be smoked or injected.

  • For example, a user might say, “I’m looking for some white girl to party with.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, someone might mention, “White girl is a popular choice for recreational drug users.”
  • Another might warn, “Using white girl can have serious consequences for your health and well-being.”

36. M30

This term refers to a specific type of opioid pill that is blue in color and has the imprint “M30” on it. The M30 pill is commonly associated with the opioid oxycodone.

  • For example, a person might say, “I found some M30s in my friend’s medicine cabinet.”
  • In a discussion about opioid abuse, someone might mention, “The M30 pill is a popular choice among recreational drug users.”
  • Another person might ask, “Does anyone know where I can buy some M30s?”

37. Demmies

This slang term is used to refer to the prescription opioid hydromorphone, which is commonly sold under the brand name Dilaudid. The term “demmies” is derived from the word “D” in Dilaudid.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I scored some demmies from my doctor.”
  • In a discussion about opioid addiction, someone might mention, “Demmies are highly addictive and can be dangerous when misused.”
  • Another person might ask, “What’s the street value of demmies?”

38. Vic

This slang term is used to refer to the prescription opioid hydrocodone, which is commonly sold under the brand name Vicodin. The term “Vic” is derived from the word “Vicodin”.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to refill my Vic prescription.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, someone might mention, “Vicodin is one of the most commonly abused prescription opioids.”
  • Another person might ask, “Can you get high from taking Vics?”

39. OC

This slang term is used to refer to the prescription opioid oxycodone, which is commonly sold under the brand name OxyContin. The term “OC” is derived from the word “OxyContin”.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m addicted to OC.”
  • In a discussion about opioid withdrawal, someone might mention, “Quitting OC cold turkey can be extremely difficult.”
  • Another person might ask, “What’s the street price of OC?”

40. Perc

This slang term is used to refer to the prescription opioid oxycodone, which is commonly sold under the brand name Percocet. The term “Perc” is derived from the word “Percocet”.

  • For example, a person might say, “I took a couple of Percs to relieve my pain.”
  • In a discussion about opioid tolerance, someone might mention, “Regular Perc use can lead to the need for higher doses.”
  • Another person might ask, “Can you snort Percs for a stronger effect?”

41. Roxies

This term refers to Roxicodone, a brand name for the generic drug oxycodone. It is often used to describe small, round pills that contain oxycodone as the active ingredient.

  • For example, “I scored some Roxies from my friend.”
  • A person discussing their addiction might say, “I’m struggling with my dependence on Roxies.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “Roxies are one of the most commonly abused prescription drugs.”

42. Oxy 30s

This term refers to 30-milligram tablets of oxycodone, a potent opioid pain medication. The “30s” in the term represents the strength of the tablets.

  • For instance, “He took two Oxy 30s to manage his pain.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of opioid abuse might say, “Oxy 30s are highly sought after on the black market.”
  • In a conversation about the opioid epidemic, someone might mention, “Many people start with Oxy 30s before transitioning to heroin.”

43. OxyCotton

This term is a misspelling and mispronunciation of OxyContin, a brand name for the generic drug oxycodone. It is often used to refer to the extended-release version of oxycodone.

  • For example, “He’s addicted to OxyCotton and can’t stop using.”
  • A person discussing the prescription opioid crisis might say, “OxyCotton is one of the most commonly abused drugs.”
  • In a conversation about treatment options, someone might mention, “Detoxing from OxyCotton can be extremely challenging.”

44. Hydro

This term refers to hydrocodone, a semi-synthetic opioid medication used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is often used to describe hydrocodone pills or the effects of hydrocodone.

  • For instance, “I took a couple of Hydros to manage my back pain.”
  • A person discussing their addiction might say, “I can’t stop taking Hydros, and it’s ruining my life.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of opioid misuse, someone might mention, “Hydro is highly addictive and can lead to overdose.”

45. Tar

This term refers to a specific form of heroin that is dark and sticky, resembling roofing tar. It is often used to describe the appearance of the drug.

  • For example, “He’s addicted to tar and has been using for years.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of heroin addiction might say, “Tar is highly potent and can lead to overdose.”
  • In a conversation about different types of heroin, someone might mention, “Black tar heroin is commonly found in certain regions of the United States.”

46. Cheese

Cheese is a street name for a dangerous combination of heroin and over-the-counter cold medicine containing acetaminophen. It is typically in a powdered form and can be snorted or injected. The term “cheese” originated in the Dallas area and gained popularity among young users.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Police seize large quantities of cheese in drug bust.”
  • A concerned parent might ask their child, “Are you aware of the dangers of cheese?”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, someone might say, “Cheese is a deadly combination that can lead to addiction and overdose.”

47. Dilly

Dilly is a slang term for Dilaudid, which is a brand name for the prescription opioid hydromorphone. Dilaudid is a powerful painkiller that is often prescribed to manage severe pain. The term “dilly” is commonly used among drug users to refer to this specific opioid.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I can get some dilly if you’re looking for a strong high.”
  • In a conversation about prescription drug abuse, someone might mention, “Dilly is highly addictive and can have serious health consequences.”
  • A healthcare professional might ask a patient, “Have you ever used dilly for pain management before?”
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