Top 22 Slang For Out Of Control – Meaning & Usage

When things go haywire and the situation spirals out of control, having the right slang to describe it can come in handy. Join us as we uncover the most fitting and trendy phrases to express those moments when chaos reigns supreme. From wild parties to unpredictable events, we’ve got you covered with the latest slang for out of control. Let’s dive in and embrace the madness together!

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1. Wildin’

This slang term is used to describe someone who is behaving in an extremely wild, reckless, or out of control way.

  • For example, “Last night at the party, John was wildin’ out on the dance floor.”
  • A friend might say, “You were really wildin’ when you jumped off that cliff into the water.”
  • Someone might comment on a video, “These kids are wildin’ with those skateboarding tricks!”

2. Off the rails

When something or someone is off the rails, it means they have become out of control or deviated from the expected or normal path.

  • For instance, “The project went off the rails when the team started arguing.”
  • A friend might say, “My diet went off the rails this weekend. I ate so much junk food.”
  • A person might describe a party as, “It was crazy! Things got completely off the rails.”

3. Going ham

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who is going all out or giving their maximum effort in a particular activity.

  • For example, “During the game, the team was going ham and scoring point after point.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m going ham on my workout today. I want to push myself to the limit.”
  • Someone might comment on a video, “This dancer is going ham with those moves!”

4. Losing it

When someone is losing it, it means they are losing control of their emotions or sanity.

  • For instance, “After the breakup, she was completely losing it and couldn’t stop crying.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ve been so stressed lately, I feel like I’m losing it.”
  • A person might describe a chaotic situation as, “Everything was falling apart and everyone was losing it.”

5. Going bonkers

When someone is going bonkers, it means they are acting in a way that is completely irrational or out of control.

  • For example, “When she saw the spider, she started screaming and going bonkers.”
  • A friend might say, “The crowd went bonkers when their favorite band took the stage.”
  • Someone might comment on a video, “This prank really made people go bonkers!”

6. Out of hand

This phrase is used to describe a situation or behavior that is no longer under control. It implies that things have escalated or gotten out of control.

  • For example, “The party got out of hand when people started breaking things.”
  • A parent might say, “My kids’ behavior is really out of hand lately.”
  • In a workplace setting, someone might say, “The project has gotten out of hand and we need to regroup.”

7. Going berserk

This phrase refers to someone or something becoming extremely angry or out of control. It suggests a wild or irrational reaction to a situation.

  • For instance, “He went berserk when he found out he didn’t get the promotion.”
  • A person might say, “The crowd went berserk when their team scored the winning goal.”
  • In a discussion about a chaotic event, someone might comment, “Things went berserk and chaos ensued.”

8. Going nuts

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is behaving in a wild or irrational manner. It implies a loss of control or sanity.

  • For example, “The kids went nuts when they saw the ice cream truck.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going nuts trying to finish this project on time.”
  • In a conversation about a thrilling experience, someone might say, “The roller coaster ride made me go nuts!”

9. Going bananas

This phrase is similar to “going nuts” and is used to describe someone or something that is behaving in a wild or irrational manner. It suggests a loss of control or sanity.

  • For instance, “The fans went bananas when their favorite band took the stage.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going bananas trying to find my lost keys.”
  • In a discussion about a chaotic situation, someone might comment, “Everything just went bananas and no one knew what to do.”

10. Going ballistic

This phrase is used to describe someone becoming extremely angry or out of control. It suggests a sudden and explosive reaction to a situation.

  • For example, “He went ballistic when he found out someone had scratched his car.”
  • A person might say, “I went ballistic when I saw the mess my roommate left in the kitchen.”
  • In a conversation about a heated argument, someone might comment, “Things got really heated and she went ballistic.”

11. Going haywire

When something is going haywire, it means that it is no longer functioning or operating properly. It can also refer to a person who is behaving erratically or unpredictably.

  • For example, “The computer system started going haywire and crashed.”
  • A person might say, “My emotions are going haywire right now, I can’t think straight.”
  • In a chaotic situation, someone might exclaim, “Everything is going haywire, we need to regain control!”

12. Going ape

To go ape means to become extremely excited, agitated, or out of control. It is often used to describe someone who is behaving in a frenzied or irrational manner.

  • For instance, “The crowd went ape when their favorite band took the stage.”
  • A person might say, “I went ape when I found out I won the lottery.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might shout, “Don’t make me go ape on you!”

13. Going off the deep end

When someone is going off the deep end, it means they are losing control of their emotions or sanity. It can also refer to someone who is behaving in an extreme or irrational manner.

  • For example, “After the breakup, she went off the deep end and started acting erratically.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like I’m going off the deep end with all the stress.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might accuse the other person of “going off the deep end.”

14. Going off the chain

To go off the chain means to become wild, unruly, or out of control. It can refer to a situation or a person’s behavior that is no longer within the bounds of normalcy.

  • For instance, “The party went off the chain once the music started.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe how the situation went off the chain.”
  • In a chaotic scene, someone might exclaim, “This situation is going off the chain, we need to do something!”

15. Going off the rocker

When someone is going off the rocker, it means they are behaving in a crazy or irrational manner. It can also refer to someone who is losing their mind or sanity.

  • For example, “He started going off the rocker after losing his job.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like I’m going off the rocker with all the stress.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might accuse the other person of “going off the rocker.”

16. Outta pocket

This phrase is used to describe someone who is behaving in a way that is considered rude, disrespectful, or out of line. It can also refer to someone who is acting in a way that is unexpected or unreasonable.

  • For example, if someone makes a rude comment, you might say, “That was completely outta pocket.”
  • If someone is being unreasonable in an argument, you could say, “You’re way outta pocket right now.”
  • If someone is acting in a way that is disrespectful, you might say, “She needs to stop acting outta pocket.”

17. Cray cray

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is extremely out of control or wild. It is a playful and exaggerated way of saying “crazy” or “insane”.

  • For instance, if someone is acting in a wild and unpredictable manner, you might say, “They’re going cray cray.”
  • If something is chaotic or chaotic, you could say, “This party is getting cray cray.”
  • If someone is doing something outrageous, you might say, “That’s cray cray, I can’t believe they did that.”

18. Out of line

This phrase is used to describe someone who is acting in a way that is considered disrespectful, inappropriate, or crossing a boundary. It implies that the person has stepped outside of the expected or acceptable behavior.

  • For example, if someone says something offensive, you might say, “That was out of line.”
  • If someone is being rude or disrespectful, you could say, “You need to stop, you’re out of line.”
  • If someone is crossing a boundary or pushing limits, you might say, “They’re really out of line with their behavior.”

19. Acting a fool

This phrase is used to describe someone who is behaving in a silly, foolish, or ridiculous manner. It implies that the person is not in control of their actions and is acting without thinking.

  • For instance, if someone is dancing and making funny faces, you might say, “They’re really acting a fool.”
  • If someone is being overly dramatic or attention-seeking, you could say, “Why are you acting a fool?”
  • If someone is doing something silly or nonsensical, you might say, “Stop acting a fool and focus on what’s important.”

20. Losing your marbles

This phrase is used to describe someone who is becoming mentally unstable or losing control of their thoughts or actions. It is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner to suggest that someone is acting in a crazy or irrational way.

  • For example, if someone is forgetting things or acting confused, you might say, “Looks like they’re losing their marbles.”
  • If someone is acting in a bizarre or irrational manner, you could say, “Are you losing your marbles?”
  • If someone is making nonsensical statements or behaving erratically, you might say, “They’ve completely lost their marbles.”

21. Going loco

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is behaving in a wild or uncontrollable manner. It is often associated with irrational or extreme behavior.

  • For example, “He lost his job and started going loco, smashing everything in his apartment.”
  • In a conversation about a chaotic party, someone might say, “Things got out of control and people were going loco.”
  • A friend might warn another about a person’s unpredictable behavior by saying, “Be careful around him, he has a tendency to go loco.”

22. Going postal

This phrase originated from a series of incidents in the 1980s and 1990s where US postal workers committed acts of violence in the workplace. It is used to describe someone who is experiencing a sudden and intense outburst of anger or aggression.

  • For instance, “He went postal after his supervisor criticized his work.”
  • In a discussion about road rage, someone might say, “That driver cut me off and I almost went postal.”
  • A person recounting a heated argument might say, “I was so mad, I thought I was going to go postal on him.”
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