Top 28 Slang For Pass Away – Meaning & Usage

Losing a loved one is never easy, and finding the right words to express that loss can be equally challenging. In this article, we’ve gathered a collection of slang terms that delicately capture the concept of passing away. Whether you’re looking to expand your vocabulary or simply curious about how language evolves to handle sensitive topics, we’ve got you covered. Let’s explore these expressions together and navigate the nuances of discussing this universal experience.

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1. Kick the bucket

This slang phrase is a euphemism for dying. It is often used humorously or sarcastically.

  • For example, someone might say, “I hope I don’t kick the bucket before I get to travel the world.”
  • In a dark comedy, a character might say, “If I keep eating like this, I’ll kick the bucket sooner rather than later.”
  • Another person might comment, “He’s lived a long life, but eventually we all kick the bucket.”

2. Bite the dust

This phrase is commonly used to describe someone or something that has died or failed.

  • For instance, someone might say, “After a long battle with illness, he finally bit the dust.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The team fought hard, but ultimately they bit the dust.”
  • A person discussing a failed business venture might say, “Unfortunately, our company bit the dust after just a year.”

3. Pushing up daisies

This phrase is a poetic way of saying someone has died and been buried.

  • For example, someone might say, “When I die, I want to be cremated. I don’t want to be pushing up daisies.”
  • In a conversation about funeral traditions, a person might comment, “In some cultures, bodies are buried in elaborate coffins, while others prefer a more natural approach, like pushing up daisies.”
  • A person jokingly discussing their mortality might say, “I’ll be pushing up daisies before I finish everything on my bucket list.”

4. Meet your maker

This phrase refers to the belief that after death, a person will meet their creator or face some sort of judgment.

  • For instance, someone might say, “When I die, I want to be ready to meet my maker.”
  • In a religious discussion, a person might comment, “I believe that after death, we all meet our maker and are held accountable for our actions.”
  • A person reflecting on their mortality might say, “I hope that when I meet my maker, I can look back on my life with pride.”

5. Cash in your chips

This phrase is a metaphorical way of saying someone has died. It originated from the idea of cashing in gambling chips at a casino.

  • For example, someone might say, “When I cash in my chips, I hope it’s peacefully in my sleep.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, a person might comment, “We never know when we’ll cash in our chips, so it’s important to live life to the fullest.”
  • A person jokingly discussing their own mortality might say, “I’ll cash in my chips after one more slice of cake.”

6. Six feet under

This phrase refers to someone who has passed away and has been buried in a grave. It is often used metaphorically to indicate death.

  • For example, “After a long battle with illness, he is now six feet under.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might say, “We all end up six feet under eventually.”
  • Another usage could be, “She’s been gone for years, but she’s still six feet under in our hearts.”

7. Buy the farm

This slang phrase is used to indicate that someone has died. Its origin is uncertain, but it is believed to come from the idea that soldiers who died in battle would have their bodies buried on a farm.

  • For instance, “After a long illness, he finally bought the farm.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might say, “We all have to buy the farm someday.”
  • Another usage could be, “He lived a long and fulfilling life before buying the farm.”

8. Pass on

This phrase is a euphemism for dying. It is a less direct way of saying that someone has passed away.

  • For example, “After a long battle with cancer, she passed on.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might say, “We all pass on eventually.”
  • Another usage could be, “He passed on peacefully in his sleep.”

9. Depart this life

This phrase is a formal way of saying that someone has died. It emphasizes the idea of leaving this life or world.

  • For instance, “After a brief illness, she departed this life.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might say, “We all have to depart this life eventually.”
  • Another usage could be, “He departed this life surrounded by loved ones.”

10. Shuffle off this mortal coil

This phrase is a poetic and dramatic way of saying that someone has died. It refers to the idea of leaving behind the mortal body and moving on to the afterlife.

  • For example, “After a long and fulfilling life, he shuffled off this mortal coil.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might say, “We all have to shuffle off this mortal coil eventually.”
  • Another usage could be, “She shuffled off this mortal coil peacefully in her sleep.”

11. Give up the ghost

This phrase is a euphemism for dying or passing away. It suggests that the person’s spirit or life force has departed from their body.

  • For example, “After a long battle with illness, he finally gave up the ghost.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might say, “We all know that one day we will give up the ghost.”
  • Another usage could be, “When the old car finally gave up the ghost, it was time to buy a new one.”

12. Go to the big sleep

This phrase is a metaphorical way of saying someone has died. It implies a peaceful and permanent rest, similar to sleeping.

  • For instance, “After a long and fulfilling life, she went to the big sleep.”
  • In a conversation about the afterlife, someone might ask, “What do you think happens after we go to the big sleep?”
  • Another usage could be, “When my grandfather went to the big sleep, it was a sad but peaceful moment.”

13. Cross over

This phrase suggests the transition from life to death. It can also imply the belief in an afterlife or the crossing of a metaphorical boundary.

  • For example, “After a long battle with illness, she finally crossed over.”
  • In a discussion about spiritual beliefs, someone might say, “I believe that when we cross over, we reunite with our loved ones.”
  • Another usage could be, “When the beloved pet crossed over, it was a difficult loss for the family.”

14. Check out

This phrase is a casual and colloquial way of saying someone has died. It implies a final departure or exit from life.

  • For instance, “He checked out peacefully in his sleep.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might say, “We never know when it’s our time to check out.”
  • Another usage could be, “When the famous actor checked out, fans around the world mourned.”

15. Bite the big one

This phrase is a slang expression for dying. It suggests a sudden or unexpected death, often with a negative connotation.

  • For example, “He bit the big one in a tragic accident.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might ask, “Have you ever thought about how you would feel if you suddenly bit the big one?”
  • Another usage could be, “When the company went bankrupt, many employees bit the big one.”

16. Go to a better place

This phrase is often used to refer to someone passing away and going to a place of peace or happiness after death.

  • For example, “After a long battle with illness, she finally went to a better place.”
  • In a eulogy, someone might say, “We take comfort in knowing that he has gone to a better place.”
  • When discussing the loss of a loved one, a person might say, “I believe that they have gone to a better place and are at peace now.”

17. Go to Davy Jones’ locker

This phrase originates from nautical slang and refers to someone dying at sea or drowning.

  • For instance, “The shipwreck resulted in many sailors going to Davy Jones’ locker.”
  • In a pirate-themed movie, a character might say, “If you cross me, you’ll be sent to Davy Jones’ locker.”
  • When discussing a tragic boating accident, someone might say, “Unfortunately, several people went to Davy Jones’ locker that day.”

18. Kick off

This phrase has a dual meaning and can either mean to start or begin something, or it can be used sarcastically to refer to someone passing away.

  • For example, “Let’s kick off the party with some music and dancing!”
  • In a darkly humorous conversation about mortality, someone might say, “When I kick off, I want a big celebration.”
  • When discussing the passing of a beloved celebrity, a person might say, “Another legend has kicked off.”

19. Meet your end

This phrase is often used to refer to someone dying or reaching the end of their life.

  • For instance, “He met his end in a tragic accident.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might say, “We all have to meet our end eventually.”
  • When discussing a character’s fate in a book or movie, a person might say, “I won’t spoil it, but they meet their end in a surprising way.”

20. Pass into the great beyond

This phrase is often used to refer to someone passing away and entering the unknown or afterlife.

  • For example, “She peacefully passed into the great beyond in her sleep.”
  • In a discussion about spirituality, someone might say, “When we pass into the great beyond, we become part of something greater.”
  • When discussing the loss of a loved one, a person might say, “We take comfort in knowing that they have passed into the great beyond.”

21. Rest in peace

This phrase is often used as a way to express condolences and wish the deceased person eternal rest. It is commonly abbreviated as RIP.

  • For example, “Rest in peace, Grandma. You will be missed.”
  • When discussing a celebrity’s death, someone might say, “RIP Kobe Bryant. He was a legendary basketball player.”
  • In a eulogy, a person might say, “May she rest in peace and find eternal happiness in the afterlife.”

22. Take a dirt nap

This slang phrase humorously refers to someone passing away and being buried in the ground. It is often used in a lighthearted or sarcastic manner.

  • For instance, if someone tells a risky joke, another person might say, “Careful, you might take a dirt nap for that.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might say, “Well, we’re all going to take a dirt nap eventually.”
  • When discussing a fictional character’s death, a fan might comment, “Looks like they took a dirt nap in the season finale.”

23. Go to the other side

This phrase suggests that when someone passes away, they are transitioning to the afterlife or another realm.

  • For example, “He fought a long battle with illness, but now he’s gone to the other side.”
  • When discussing a spiritual belief in an afterlife, someone might say, “When we die, we go to the other side and reunite with our loved ones.”
  • In a conversation about near-death experiences, a person might share, “I glimpsed the other side, but I wasn’t ready to go there yet.”

24. Go to the happy hunting ground

This phrase is often used in Native American culture to refer to the afterlife or the place where spirits go after death. It suggests a peaceful and abundant place.

  • For instance, “She lived a fulfilling life and has now gone to the happy hunting ground.”
  • When discussing cultural beliefs about the afterlife, someone might say, “In some Native American traditions, the happy hunting ground is seen as a paradise.”
  • In a conversation about honoring deceased loved ones, a person might suggest, “Let’s remember them and believe they’re in the happy hunting ground.”

25. Go to the pearly gates

This phrase refers to the entrance to heaven or the afterlife. It suggests that when someone passes away, they are going to be judged and enter a heavenly realm.

  • For example, “After a life well-lived, she has now gone to the pearly gates.”
  • When discussing religious beliefs, someone might say, “I believe that when we die, we go to the pearly gates and meet God.”
  • In a conversation about grieving, a person might say, “I find comfort in knowing that my loved ones are waiting for me at the pearly gates.”

26. Go to the sweet hereafter

This phrase is a euphemism for dying or passing away. It suggests that after death, the person goes to a pleasant or peaceful place.

  • For example, someone might say, “After a long battle with illness, she finally went to the sweet hereafter.”
  • In a eulogy, a person might say, “He lived a full life and has now gone to the sweet hereafter.”
  • When discussing the loss of a loved one, a person might mention, “It’s comforting to believe that they are now in the sweet hereafter.”

27. Go to the undiscovered country

This phrase is a metaphorical way of saying that someone has died. It refers to the unknown or mysterious realm of death.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He has gone to the undiscovered country, leaving behind a legacy.”
  • In a poem or literature, the phrase might be used to convey the idea of mortality and the journey into the afterlife.
  • When discussing the passing of a famous figure, someone might mention, “Their contributions will be remembered even in the undiscovered country.”

28. Go to the eternal rest

This phrase is a common way to express condolences or respect for someone who has died. It suggests that the person has found eternal peace or tranquility.

  • For example, people might say, “May they go to eternal rest and find solace.”
  • In a eulogy or obituary, it’s common to mention, “She will be remembered for her kindness and may she rest in eternal peace.”
  • When discussing the loss of a loved one, a person might say, “Though they are gone, we hope they have found eternal rest.”
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