Top 31 Slang For Stresses – Meaning & Usage

Feeling overwhelmed by the daily grind? Look no further! We’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang for stresses that will have you nodding in agreement and maybe even laughing at the accuracy. From “adulting” to “life admin,” we’ve decoded the language of stress so you can navigate through your tough days with a little more ease. So sit back, relax, and let us guide you through the world of relatable stress slang.

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1. Freaking out

This phrase is used to describe a state of extreme anxiety or panic.

  • For example, “I have so much work to do, I’m freaking out.”
  • A person might say, “I’m freaking out about my upcoming presentation.”
  • Someone might express, “I was freaking out when I lost my phone.”

2. On edge

When someone is on edge, they are feeling tense, anxious, or nervous.

  • For instance, “I’ve been on edge all day, waiting for the test results.”
  • A person might say, “The constant noise in this city puts me on edge.”
  • Someone might express, “I’m on edge about the upcoming job interview.”

3. Under pressure

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of being stressed or burdened by expectations or responsibilities.

  • For example, “I’m under a lot of pressure to finish this project on time.”
  • A person might say, “I feel under pressure to perform well in this competition.”
  • Someone might express, “Being under pressure at work is causing me a lot of stress.”

4. Strung out

When someone is strung out, they are feeling exhausted, mentally drained, or overwhelmed.

  • For instance, “I’ve been working long hours all week, and I’m feeling strung out.”
  • A person might say, “The constant demands of school have me feeling strung out.”
  • Someone might express, “I’ve been dealing with family issues, and it’s left me feeling strung out.”

5. Burned out

When someone is burned out, they are feeling exhausted, emotionally drained, and lacking motivation due to prolonged stress or overwork.

  • For example, “I’ve been working non-stop for months, and I’m completely burned out.”
  • A person might say, “I used to love my job, but now I feel burned out.”
  • Someone might express, “I need a vacation to recover from this burnout.”

6. Anxious AF

This phrase is an abbreviation for “Anxious as F***” and is used to convey an extreme level of anxiety or stress.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have a big presentation tomorrow and I’m anxious AF.”
  • Another person might post on social media, “Feeling anxious AF about this job interview.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you anxious AF about the upcoming exam?”

7. Stressed to the max

This phrase is used to express being under an overwhelming amount of stress.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have so much work to do, I’m stressed to the max.”
  • A student might exclaim, “Finals week has me stressed to the max.”
  • A colleague might sympathize, “I can see you’re stressed to the max. Take a break and breathe.”

8. Losing it

This phrase is used to describe reaching a breaking point or feeling like one’s stress is becoming unmanageable.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have so much to do, I feel like I’m losing it.”
  • A parent might exclaim, “With the kids at home all day, I’m losing it.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you okay? You seem like you’re losing it.”

9. Stressed out

This phrase is a common way to describe feeling a high level of stress.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m so stressed out about this deadline.”
  • A student might complain, “I’m stressed out with all these exams.”
  • A coworker might sympathize, “I can tell you’re stressed out. Take a deep breath and relax.”

10. Pulling my hair out

This phrase is used to convey a high level of frustration or stress.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been trying to fix this problem for hours, I’m pulling my hair out.”
  • A parent might exclaim, “With the kids constantly fighting, I’m pulling my hair out.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s wrong? You look like you’re pulling your hair out.”

11. On the brink

This phrase refers to being on the verge of a breakdown or reaching a critical point of stress or pressure.

  • For example, “After working long hours for weeks, she was on the brink of exhaustion.”
  • A person facing financial difficulties might say, “I’m on the brink of bankruptcy.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might exclaim, “We’re on the brink of disaster!”

12. Struggling

This term describes the state of facing challenges or difficulties, often related to stress or pressure.

  • For instance, “She’s struggling with the demands of her new job.”
  • A student overwhelmed with assignments might say, “I’m struggling to keep up with all the coursework.”
  • A person dealing with personal issues might confide, “I’ve been struggling with depression lately.”

13. Under the gun

This phrase is often used to describe a situation where someone is under a lot of stress or facing a tight deadline.

  • For example, “I’m under the gun to finish this report by tomorrow.”
  • A student studying for exams might say, “I feel like I’m constantly under the gun.”
  • In a work setting, someone might comment, “We’re all under the gun to meet the project deadline.”

14. Tense as a rubber band

This expression describes someone who is highly stressed or anxious, comparing their state to a tightly stretched rubber band.

  • For instance, “She’s been tense as a rubber band ever since the interview.”
  • A person waiting for important news might say, “I’m feeling tense as a rubber band.”
  • In a high-pressure situation, someone might comment, “Everyone in the room was as tense as a rubber band.”

15. Wound up

This term describes a state of being highly anxious, nervous, or uptight, often due to stress.

  • For example, “I’m feeling really wound up about the upcoming presentation.”
  • A person preparing for a big event might say, “I always get wound up before public speaking.”
  • In a stressful situation, someone might comment, “I’m too wound up to relax right now.”

16. Stressed to the nines

This phrase means being stressed to the highest degree or to the maximum extent possible. It is often used to convey a feeling of being overwhelmed or under intense pressure.

  • For example, “I have so many assignments due tomorrow, I’m stressed to the nines.”
  • Another example could be, “She’s been working overtime for weeks, she’s stressed to the nines.”
  • In a conversation about a tight deadline, someone might say, “I need to finish this project by tomorrow, I’m stressed to the nines.”

17. Stressed to the gills

This phrase means being extremely stressed or overwhelmed with stress. It refers to feeling like one is drowning or suffocating in stress, similar to a fish being overwhelmed with water.

  • For instance, “I have so much work to do, I’m stressed to the gills.”
  • Another example could be, “Between work, school, and personal life, I’m stressed to the gills.”
  • In a conversation about a hectic schedule, someone might say, “I have back-to-back meetings all day, I’m stressed to the gills.”

18. Stressed to the hilt

This phrase means being completely or fully stressed. It signifies being under a significant amount of stress or pressure, often to the point of feeling overwhelmed.

  • For example, “With all the deadlines and responsibilities, I’m stressed to the hilt.”
  • Another example could be, “The upcoming exam has me stressed to the hilt.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “Dealing with this problem has me stressed to the hilt.”

19. Stressed to the eyeballs

This phrase means being extremely stressed or overwhelmed with stress. It emphasizes the intensity of the stress, as if one’s stress has reached the point of overflowing or being present in every aspect of their life.

  • For instance, “Between work, family, and personal issues, I’m stressed to the eyeballs.”
  • Another example could be, “The constant pressure has me stressed to the eyeballs.”
  • In a conversation about a demanding project, someone might say, “The tight deadline has me stressed to the eyeballs.”

20. Stressed to the limit

This phrase means being pushed or pushed oneself to the maximum level of stress or pressure. It implies that one’s stress has reached its peak or the highest possible point.

  • For example, “The constant demands have me stressed to the limit.”
  • Another example could be, “I’ve been juggling multiple responsibilities, I’m stressed to the limit.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, someone might say, “I can’t handle any more stress, I’m already stressed to the limit.”

21. Stressed to the breaking point

This phrase is used to describe a state of extreme stress or pressure, to the point where one feels like they are about to break or reach their breaking point.

  • For example, “I have so much work to do, I’m stressed to the breaking point.”
  • A student might say, “Finals week has me stressed to the breaking point.”
  • Someone might express, “I can’t handle any more responsibilities, I’m stressed to the breaking point.”

22. Nervous wreck

This term refers to someone who is in a constant state of nervousness or anxiety, unable to calm down or relax.

  • For instance, “I have a big presentation tomorrow and I’m a nervous wreck.”
  • A person might say, “I’m a nervous wreck before job interviews.”
  • Someone might describe themselves as, “I’m always a nervous wreck when meeting new people.”

23. Going crazy

This phrase is used to describe a state of extreme stress or frustration, where one feels like they are losing control or going insane.

  • For example, “I have so much on my plate, I feel like I’m going crazy.”
  • A person might say, “The constant noise in the city is driving me crazy.”
  • Someone might express, “The pressure at work is making me feel like I’m going crazy.”

24. Stressed beyond belief

This phrase is used to describe a state of extreme stress or pressure, to the point where one feels like they can’t handle it anymore.

  • For instance, “I have so many deadlines, I’m stressed beyond belief.”
  • A student might say, “The workload this semester is stressing me out beyond belief.”
  • Someone might express, “The constant demands of parenting have me stressed beyond belief.”

25. Stressed to the core

This phrase is used to describe a state of deep and intense stress, where one feels it at their very core.

  • For example, “The constant pressure at work has me stressed to the core.”
  • A person might say, “I’m stressed to the core about my upcoming exams.”
  • Someone might express, “The financial difficulties I’m facing have me stressed to the core.”

26. Stressed to the brink

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling extreme stress or pressure, to the point where they feel like they can’t handle it anymore.

  • For example, “I have so much work to do, I’m stressed to the brink.”
  • Another example, “With all the deadlines piling up, I’m feeling stressed to the brink.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m stressed to the brink with all the responsibilities I have to juggle.”

27. Anxious wreck

This term is used to describe someone who is feeling intense anxiety and is unable to handle it well.

  • For instance, “I have a big presentation tomorrow and I’m an anxious wreck.”
  • Another example, “After the car accident, I’ve been an anxious wreck.”
  • Someone might say, “I have so much on my plate right now, I feel like an anxious wreck.”

28. Losing my mind

This phrase is used to express extreme stress or frustration, to the point where it feels like one’s mental state is slipping.

  • For example, “I’ve been dealing with so much lately, I feel like I’m losing my mind.”
  • Another example, “With all the deadlines and responsibilities, I’m losing my mind.”
  • Someone might say, “I have so many things to worry about, I feel like I’m losing my mind.”

29. Struggling to cope

This phrase is used to describe someone who is finding it hard to handle or manage their stress or pressure.

  • For instance, “I’m struggling to cope with all the demands of work and family.”
  • Another example, “After the breakup, I’ve been struggling to cope with my emotions.”
  • Someone might say, “With everything going on, I’m really struggling to cope.”

30. Stressed out of my mind

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling an overwhelming amount of stress or pressure.

  • For example, “I have so many deadlines, I’m stressed out of my mind.”
  • Another example, “With all the responsibilities, I’m constantly stressed out of my mind.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t handle any more stress, I’m already stressed out of my mind.”

31. Feeling the strain

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of being overwhelmed or stressed out. It implies that someone is experiencing a high level of strain or tension.

  • For example, “I’ve been working long hours all week and I’m really feeling the strain.”
  • In a conversation about work, someone might say, “I have so many deadlines to meet, I’m really feeling the strain.”
  • A student might say, “With exams coming up, I’m definitely feeling the strain.”
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