Top 57 Slang For Pertain – Meaning & Usage

Pertain is a versatile word that can add flair and specificity to your conversations. Whether you’re looking to sound more professional in a meeting or just want to spice up your everyday language, understanding the slang for pertain is key. Our team has compiled a list of the trendiest and most useful slang terms related to pertain that will have you speaking like a pro in no time. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to level up your vocabulary game!

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1. Relate

To have a connection or association with something or someone.

  • For example, “I can relate to that story about growing up in a small town.”
  • In a discussion about a shared experience, someone might say, “I can relate to what you’re going through.”
  • When someone shares a funny meme, a person might comment, “I can definitely relate to this!”

2. Apply

To put something into action or implement it in a specific situation.

  • For instance, “You can apply this technique to solve the math problem.”
  • In a job interview, a person might say, “I have the skills and knowledge to apply them effectively.”
  • When giving advice, someone might suggest, “You should apply sunscreen before going out in the sun.”

3. Concern

To be involved or connected with a particular situation or matter.

  • For example, “This issue concerns the safety of our community.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “The concerns raised by the protestors are valid.”
  • When discussing a problem, a person might ask, “What are the main concerns we need to address?”

4. Touch on

To briefly talk about or mention a specific topic or subject.

  • For instance, “The speaker touched on the importance of climate change in his presentation.”
  • In a conversation about different genres of music, someone might say, “Let’s touch on the topic of classical music.”
  • When discussing a book, a person might mention, “The author touches on the theme of identity throughout the novel.”

5. Bear on

To be relevant or applicable to a particular situation or matter.

  • For example, “The evidence presented doesn’t bear on the defendant’s guilt.”
  • In a discussion about a current event, someone might say, “This news article doesn’t bear on the main topic.”
  • When analyzing a research study, a person might note, “The findings bear on the effectiveness of the treatment.”

6. Have to do with

This phrase is used to describe something that is connected or associated with another thing or topic. It implies a connection or relevance between the two.

  • For example, “His job has to do with computer programming.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The title doesn’t have much to do with the actual story.”
  • A teacher might explain, “This lesson has to do with basic algebraic equations.”

7. Connect

To “connect” means to join or bring together two or more things. It can also refer to the act of establishing a relationship or association between different elements.

  • For instance, “The bridge connects the two sides of the city.”
  • In a conversation about networking, someone might say, “I need to connect with more professionals in my field.”
  • A person explaining a theory might say, “This concept connects various ideas from different disciplines.”

8. Involve

When something “involves” something else, it means that the second thing is part of or included in the first thing. It implies a connection or participation.

  • For example, “The project involves multiple team members.”
  • In a discussion about a recipe, someone might say, “This dish involves a lot of chopping and sautéing.”
  • A person describing a job might say, “The role involves both customer service and administrative tasks.”

9. Impact

To “impact” something means to have a significant effect or influence on it. It implies a strong and noticeable result or consequence.

  • For instance, “The new policy will impact the company’s bottom line.”
  • In a conversation about climate change, someone might say, “Rising temperatures will impact ecosystems worldwide.”
  • A person discussing a personal experience might say, “The accident had a lasting impact on my life.”

10. Refer to

To “refer to” something means to mention or allude to it. It implies using a word or phrase to indicate or describe something else.

  • For example, “The term ‘LOL’ refers to ‘laugh out loud’.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The title refers to a metaphor in the story.”
  • A teacher might explain, “When I say ‘the author,’ I’m referring to the person who wrote the book.”

11. Relate to

When someone says, “I can relate to that,” they mean they understand and have had a similar experience.

  • For example, if someone shares a funny story, another person might say, “I can totally relate to that!”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “I’ve been there, I can relate.”
  • When discussing a shared interest, a person might say, “I relate to your love for music.”

12. Belong to

When someone says, “That idea belongs to me,” they mean they came up with it or it is their intellectual property.

  • For instance, in a group project, someone might say, “This section belongs to me, I’ll take care of it.”
  • In a discussion about a specific cultural practice, someone might say, “That tradition belongs to our community.”
  • When talking about a personal possession, someone might say, “This book belongs to me, please don’t lose it.”

13. Touch upon

When someone says, “Let’s touch upon that topic,” they mean they want to briefly talk about it.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “Before we move on, let’s touch upon the budget.”
  • In a conversation about a complex issue, someone might say, “We can touch upon the ethical implications later.”
  • When discussing a specific point in an argument, someone might say, “Let’s touch upon the evidence supporting this claim.”

14. Apply to

When someone says, “These rules apply to everyone,” they mean they are relevant and must be followed by everyone.

  • For instance, in a job interview, someone might say, “These qualifications apply to all candidates.”
  • In a discussion about a specific law, someone might say, “This legislation applies to all citizens.”
  • When talking about a general principle, someone might say, “These guidelines apply to any situation.”

15. Have relevance to

When someone says, “This information has relevance to our project,” they mean it is important and has a connection to what they are working on.

  • For example, in a research paper, someone might say, “This study has relevance to our hypothesis.”
  • In a discussion about a historical event, someone might say, “This document has relevance to understanding the context.”
  • When talking about personal experiences, someone might say, “This memory has relevance to my decision-making process.”

16. Have a bearing on

This phrase is used to indicate that something is relevant or has an impact on a particular situation or outcome.

  • For example, “The new regulations have a bearing on how companies operate in the industry.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “The rising temperatures have a bearing on the migration patterns of certain species.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Pay attention to the details, as they have a bearing on your final grade.”

17. Have connection to

This phrase is used to describe a relationship or connection between two or more things.

  • For instance, “Her family has a connection to the royal family.”
  • In a conversation about a crime, someone might say, “The suspect has a connection to the victim.”
  • A historian might explain, “This artifact has a connection to an important event in history.”

18. Connect with

This phrase is used to describe the act of forming a connection or bond with another person.

  • For example, “I really connect with her music, it speaks to me.”
  • In a discussion about networking, someone might say, “I’m trying to connect with professionals in my industry.”
  • A friend might tell you, “I think you two would really connect, you have similar interests.”

19. Involve with

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is participating or associated with a particular activity or situation.

  • For instance, “He is involved with a charity organization.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “I need someone who is involved with graphic design.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “Don’t get involved with the wrong crowd, it can lead to trouble.”

20. Impact on

This phrase is used to describe the effect or influence that something has on a particular situation or outcome.

  • For example, “The new policy has a significant impact on the environment.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “Social media has had a major impact on how we communicate.”
  • A business owner might explain, “The economic downturn has had a negative impact on our sales.”

21. Refer with

This phrase is used to indicate a connection or association between two things or people. It suggests that one thing or person is related or linked to another.

  • For example, “I always refer with my best friend when making important decisions.”
  • In a discussion about a specific topic, someone might say, “The author’s ideas refer with the current research in the field.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you refer with your parents when choosing a college major?”

22. Relate with

This phrase is used to express a sense of understanding or connection with something or someone. It implies that one can relate to or understand a particular situation or experience.

  • For instance, “I can really relate with the main character in that book.”
  • In a conversation about personal struggles, someone might say, “I can relate with what you’re going through.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you relate with the challenges of being a student athlete?”

23. Belong with

This phrase suggests that something or someone is a good match or suitable for a particular situation or group. It implies that there is a sense of compatibility or harmony.

  • For example, “That painting really belongs with the rest of the artwork in the gallery.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “Those shoes don’t belong with that outfit.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you think that song belongs with the rest of the album?”

24. Touch with

This phrase is used to express a sense of emotional or personal connection with someone or something. It implies that there is a level of understanding or empathy.

  • For instance, “I really touch with the lyrics of that song.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “I don’t feel like I touch with my partner anymore.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you touch with the struggles of being a working parent?”

25. Apply with

This phrase suggests that something is applicable or relevant to a particular situation or context. It implies that there is a practical use or significance.

  • For example, “The principles taught in that course apply with real-world scenarios.”
  • In a discussion about job qualifications, someone might say, “Does your experience apply with the requirements of the position?”
  • A person might ask, “How does this theory apply with the current economic situation?”

26. Concern with

This phrase is used to indicate that something is related to or involved with a particular topic or issue.

  • For example, “This article discusses the challenges concern with climate change.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “We need to address the issues concern with the budget.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Your assignment should focus on the concepts concern with human rights.”

27. Bear with

This phrase is used to ask someone to be patient or tolerant in a situation.

  • For instance, “Please bear with me while I try to find the information you requested.”
  • In a customer service interaction, a representative might say, “We are experiencing technical difficulties. Please bear with us.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Bear with me as I explain the route to you.”

28. Have on

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is wearing or carrying something.

  • For example, “She always has on a stylish hat.”
  • In a fashion discussion, someone might say, “I love the outfit you have on.”
  • A person complimenting a friend might say, “You always have the coolest accessories on.”

29. Connect to

This phrase is used to indicate that something is linked or related to another thing.

  • For instance, “The article connects the rise in smartphone use to decreased social interaction.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might say, “The themes in this novel connect to the author’s own experiences.”
  • A teacher might ask their students, “Can you connect this historical event to what we’ve been learning in class?”

30. Involve in

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is included or engaged in a particular activity or situation.

  • For example, “She is involved in several community organizations.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “We need to involve more stakeholders in the decision-making process.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Are you involved in any after-school activities?”

31. Impact with

This phrase is used to describe the act of coming into contact or colliding with something or someone. It implies a forceful or significant encounter.

  • For example, “He was walking and accidentally impacted with a lamppost.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The player impacted with the opponent and knocked him down.”
  • A person describing a car accident might say, “The two vehicles impacted with each other at high speed.”

32. Correspond

This term is used to describe when two things align or match with each other in a certain way.

  • For instance, “The data from the study corresponds with the findings of previous research.”
  • In a conversation about schedules, someone might say, “Let’s check if our availability corresponds before setting a meeting.”
  • A person discussing handwriting might say, “The way someone forms their letters can correspond with their personality traits.”

33. Have a connection to

This phrase is used to describe a relationship between two things or concepts, suggesting that they are related or linked in some way.

  • For example, “The symbol on the flag has a connection to the country’s history.”
  • In a discussion about family heritage, someone might say, “I have a connection to my ancestors who emigrated from Ireland.”
  • A person describing a scientific discovery might say, “The new research has a connection to previous studies in the same field.”

34. Have an impact on

This phrase is used to describe the influence or effect that something has on another thing or situation.

  • For instance, “The new policy will have an impact on the company’s profits.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “Human activities have an impact on the environment.”
  • A person describing a personal experience might say, “The loss of a loved one had a significant impact on my life.”

35. Have a relation to

This phrase is used to describe a connection or relationship between two things, suggesting that they are linked or associated in some way.

  • For example, “The painting has a relation to the artist’s childhood memories.”
  • In a conversation about genetics, someone might say, “Certain genes have a relation to the development of certain diseases.”
  • A person discussing a historical event might say, “The war had a relation to the political tensions of the time.”

36. Have a link to

This phrase is used to describe a connection or association with something or someone. It implies a relationship or correlation between two things.

  • For example, “I have a link to that website, so I can access all the information.”
  • A person might say, “I have a link to the music industry because my cousin is a famous singer.”
  • In a conversation about networking, someone might mention, “It’s important to have a link to influential people in your industry.”

37. Have a tie to

This phrase is used to describe a relationship or connection to something or someone. It implies a close association or bond.

  • For instance, “I have a tie to that organization because I used to work there.”
  • A person might say, “I have a tie to the city because I grew up there.”
  • In a discussion about family history, someone might mention, “I have a tie to my ancestors who immigrated to this country.”

38. Have a bond with

This phrase is used to describe a close emotional connection or relationship with someone. It implies a strong bond or attachment.

  • For example, “I have a bond with my best friend because we’ve known each other since childhood.”
  • A person might say, “I have a bond with my pet because we’ve been through so much together.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might mention, “It’s important to have a bond with your colleagues to foster collaboration.”

39. Have a touch with

This phrase is used to describe being in contact or communication with someone. It implies a connection or interaction.

  • For instance, “I have a touch with my old classmates through social media.”
  • A person might say, “I have a touch with my relatives who live overseas through video calls.”
  • In a discussion about networking, someone might mention, “It’s important to have a touch with industry professionals to stay updated on trends.”

40. Have a concern with

This phrase is used to describe being interested in or involved with something. It implies a level of attention or involvement.

  • For example, “I have a concern with environmental issues and try to live a sustainable lifestyle.”
  • A person might say, “I have a concern with my health, so I exercise regularly and eat nutritious food.”
  • In a conversation about social issues, someone might mention, “It’s important to have a concern with the well-being of marginalized communities.”

41. Have a bearing with

This phrase is used to indicate that something is relevant or has an impact on a certain situation or topic.

  • For example, “The evidence presented in the trial has a bearing with the final verdict.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “The rising temperatures have a bearing with the melting ice caps.”
  • A teacher might explain to a student, “Your behavior in class has a bearing with your grades.”

42. Have a regard with

This phrase is used to indicate that something is considered or taken into account in a certain situation or decision.

  • For instance, “When making a career choice, you should have a regard with your passions and interests.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, someone might argue, “We should have a regard with the opinions and experiences of marginalized communities.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “You should have a regard with the consequences of your actions before making a decision.”

43. Have a reference to

This phrase is used to indicate that something is mentioned or alluded to in a certain context.

  • For example, “The book has several chapters that have a reference to historical events.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “The film has a reference to a famous scene from a classic film.”
  • A writer might include a footnote that says, “This statement has a reference to a study conducted in 2018.”

44. Have a touch on

This phrase is used to indicate that something is briefly mentioned or discussed in a certain context.

  • For instance, “The article has a touch on the importance of mental health.”
  • In a presentation about a complex topic, someone might say, “I will have a touch on the key points of each section.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “The upcoming lesson will have a touch on the history of ancient civilizations.”

45. Have a connection with

This phrase is used to indicate that something is related or linked to a certain context or topic.

  • For example, “The character’s actions have a connection with their traumatic past.”
  • In a discussion about family dynamics, someone might say, “The way we communicate has a connection with our upbringing.”
  • A therapist might ask their client, “Do you think your current feelings have a connection with your past experiences?”

46. Have a relation with

This phrase is used to describe a connection or association between two things or people. It suggests that there is some kind of relationship between them.

  • For example, “The company has a relation with the local community and supports various charitable initiatives.”
  • In a discussion about family, someone might say, “I have a relation with my cousin through marriage.”
  • When talking about a crime investigation, a detective might mention, “The evidence found at the scene has a relation with the suspect’s previous criminal activities.”

47. Have a link with

This phrase implies a connection or relationship between two things or people. It suggests that there is a link or bond between them.

  • For instance, “The study found that there is a link with stress levels and overall well-being.”
  • When discussing history, someone might say, “This event has a link with the rise of a new political ideology.”
  • In a conversation about technology, a person might mention, “The new software update has a link with improved performance and security.”

48. Have a tie with

This phrase indicates a connection or association between two things or people. It suggests that there is a tie or bond between them.

  • For example, “The organization has a tie with several international partners for collaborative projects.”
  • When discussing sports, someone might say, “The player has a tie with a famous coach who helped shape their career.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, a person might mention, “This designer brand has a tie with sustainability and ethical production practices.”

49. Have a bond to

This phrase implies a connection or relationship between two things or people. It suggests that there is a bond or connection between them.

  • For instance, “The siblings have a bond to each other that cannot be broken.”
  • When discussing music, someone might say, “This song has a bond to a specific memory or moment in my life.”
  • In a conversation about culture, a person might mention, “The traditional dance has a bond to the history and heritage of the community.”

50. Have a touch to

This phrase indicates a connection or association between two things or people. It suggests that there is a touch or connection between them.

  • For example, “The painting has a touch to the artist’s personal experiences and emotions.”
  • When discussing literature, someone might say, “The novel has a touch to themes of identity and belonging.”
  • In a conversation about science, a person might mention, “This discovery has a touch to advancements in medical research and treatment.”

This phrase is used to indicate a connection or association between two things or ideas. It suggests that there is a relationship or relevance between the two.

  • For example, “This article links to the previous one, providing more information on the topic.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “The sequel links to the original film by continuing the storyline.”
  • A blogger might write, “This post links to other resources for further reading on the subject.”

52. Tie in with

This expression means to relate or connect to something else, often in terms of ideas or themes. It implies that there is a correlation or relationship between the two.

  • For instance, “The ending of the book ties in with the beginning, creating a full circle.”
  • In a marketing campaign, someone might say, “We need to tie in our social media efforts with our email marketing strategy.”
  • A teacher might explain, “This lesson ties in with the previous one, building on the concepts we’ve already learned.”

53. Have connection with

This phrase indicates that there is a relationship or association between two things or ideas. It suggests that there is some relevance or connection between the two.

  • For example, “This event has a connection with the historical context of the time.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might say, “This song has a strong connection with the artist’s personal experiences.”
  • A researcher might note, “The findings of this study have a connection with previous research in the field.”

54. Be pertinent to

This phrase means to be applicable or related to a particular topic or situation. It implies that something is important or significant in relation to the subject at hand.

  • For instance, “The data presented is pertinent to the discussion on climate change.”
  • In a job interview, someone might say, “My experience in project management is pertinent to this position.”
  • A teacher might explain, “This lesson is pertinent to the next unit, as it lays the foundation for further learning.”

55. Be in reference to

This expression is used to indicate that something is being mentioned or alluded to in relation to a specific topic or context. It suggests that there is a connection or relevance between the two.

  • For example, “The quote in the article is in reference to the author’s philosophy.”
  • In a presentation, someone might say, “This graph is in reference to the data collected from our survey.”
  • A historian might note, “The document is in reference to the events leading up to the war.”

56. Be in connection with

This phrase is used to describe something that is related or connected to another thing or person.

  • For example, “The evidence found at the crime scene is in connection with the suspect.”
  • In a discussion about a business partnership, someone might say, “Our company is in connection with a major distributor.”
  • A person might ask, “Does this new policy have any connection with the recent changes in the law?”

57. Be in relation to

This phrase is used to indicate that something is relevant or pertinent to another thing or situation.

  • For instance, “The new regulations are in relation to public safety.”
  • In a conversation about a research paper, someone might say, “This study is in relation to the effects of climate change.”
  • A person might ask, “How is this information in relation to our current project?”
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