Top 36 Slang For Pertinent – Meaning & Usage

Pertinent may seem like just another word in the dictionary, but in the world of slang, it holds a special place. From casual conversations to online interactions, this term has evolved to convey a sense of relevance and importance.

Join us as we unravel the diverse ways in which “pertinent” is used in modern language, shedding light on its nuances and applications. Stay ahead of the curve and enrich your linguistic repertoire with this insightful exploration of a word that’s more than meets the eye.

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1. On Point

This term is used to describe something that is precise, accurate, or correct. It can refer to a statement, an action, or a person’s appearance.

  • For example, “Her presentation was on point. She covered all the important details.”
  • A friend might comment, “Your outfit is on point today. You look great.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “The acting in that scene was on point. It felt very authentic.”

2. Spot-on

This slang term is used to describe something that is perfectly accurate or precise. It implies that the person or thing being referred to has hit the mark or achieved the desired result.

  • For instance, “Her analysis of the situation was spot-on. She identified all the key factors.”
  • A friend might say, “Your guess was spot-on. You knew exactly what I was thinking.”
  • In a review of a restaurant, someone might write, “The chef’s recommendation was spot-on. The flavors were perfectly balanced.”

3. Key

This term is used to describe something that is essential or important. It implies that the thing being referred to plays a crucial role or holds significant value.

  • For example, “Communication is key in any relationship.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Teamwork is the key to success.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “Attention to detail is key. We need to make sure everything is perfect.”

4. Crucial

This slang term is used to describe something that is extremely important or necessary. It emphasizes the significance or impact of the thing being referred to.

  • For instance, “Getting a good night’s sleep before the exam is crucial. It will help you perform your best.”
  • A coworker might say, “Your contribution to the project was crucial. We couldn’t have done it without you.”
  • In a discussion about a business decision, someone might argue, “Timing is crucial. We need to launch at the right moment.”

5. Vital

This term is used to describe something that is absolutely necessary or essential. It emphasizes the importance or urgency of the thing being referred to.

  • For example, “Proper nutrition is vital for maintaining good health.”
  • A doctor might say, “Early detection is vital in treating this disease.”
  • In a discussion about a job interview, someone might advise, “Confidence is vital. It can make or break your chances of getting hired.”

6. Critical

This word is used to describe something that is extremely important or necessary for the success or outcome of a situation. It emphasizes the significance and urgency of the matter at hand.

  • For example, in a business meeting, someone might say, “It’s critical that we meet our sales targets this quarter.”
  • In a medical emergency, a doctor might declare, “Time is critical, we need to act fast.”
  • A teacher might stress to their students, “The final exam is critical for your overall grade, so make sure to study.”

7. Relevant

When something is relevant, it means it is directly related or connected to a particular topic or situation. It implies that the information or context is useful and applicable in the given context.

  • For instance, in a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “It’s important to consider relevant scientific research.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might mention, “I have experience in a relevant field that aligns with this position.”
  • A student might ask their teacher, “Is this information relevant to our upcoming exam?”

8. Salient

Salient refers to something that stands out or is easily noticeable. It highlights the most important or significant aspects of a topic or situation.

  • For example, in a presentation, someone might say, “Let’s focus on the salient points of our research.”
  • In a news article, a journalist might highlight, “The salient feature of this new technology is its energy efficiency.”
  • A coach might point out to their team, “The salient weakness of our opponents is their defense, so let’s exploit that.”

9. Pivotal

Pivotal describes something that is essential or central to the success or outcome of a situation. It suggests that the particular element or factor plays a critical role in determining the course of events.

  • For instance, in a political campaign, someone might say, “The upcoming debate is pivotal for the candidate’s chances of winning.”
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might note, “This data point is pivotal in proving our hypothesis.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “This game is pivotal for our season, so give it your all.”

10. Significant

Significant refers to something that is important or meaningful. It implies that the particular thing has a notable impact or influence on a situation or outcome.

  • For example, in a historical event, someone might say, “This was a significant moment that shaped the course of history.”
  • In a research study, a scientist might state, “The results of this experiment are significant in advancing our understanding.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “It’s important to include significant examples in your essay to support your argument.”

11. Pertinent

This word is used to describe something that is relevant or applicable to a particular topic or situation. It suggests that the information or idea is important and directly related to the matter at hand.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s focus on the pertinent issues and not get sidetracked.”
  • In a research paper, a student might write, “The author provides pertinent evidence to support their argument.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Your question is not pertinent to our discussion, please stay on topic.”

12. Material

This slang term is used to describe something that is important or relevant to a particular subject or situation. It implies that the information or idea is significant and worth considering.

  • For instance, in a court case, a lawyer might say, “The evidence presented is not material to the case.”
  • In a job interview, an interviewer might ask, “Do you have any additional material that supports your qualifications?”
  • A student might ask a teacher, “Is this information material to the upcoming exam?”

13. Applicable

This word is used to describe something that is relevant or suitable to a particular situation or context. It suggests that the information or idea can be applied or used effectively in the given circumstances.

  • For example, in a discussion about marketing strategies, someone might say, “This approach is not applicable to our target audience.”
  • In a cooking class, a chef might explain, “These techniques are applicable to a wide range of recipes.”
  • A manager might advise an employee, “Make sure your suggestions are applicable to our current project.”

14. Appropriate

This slang term is used to describe something that is suitable or fitting for a particular situation or purpose. It implies that the information or idea is suitable and meets the expected standards or requirements.

  • For instance, in a formal setting, someone might say, “Please dress appropriately for the occasion.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might remind students, “Use appropriate language when participating in class discussions.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Your behavior at the party was not appropriate.”

15. Essential

This word is used to describe something that is extremely important or necessary. It suggests that the information or idea is vital and indispensable to the overall outcome or success.

  • For example, in a business meeting, someone might say, “It is essential that we meet our sales targets this quarter.”
  • In a medical emergency, a doctor might state, “Immediate treatment is essential for the patient’s survival.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Communication and teamwork are essential for winning the game.”

16. Indispensable

This slang term refers to something that is absolutely necessary or essential. It emphasizes the importance and value of the item or concept.

  • For example, in a discussion about kitchen gadgets, someone might say, “A good chef’s knife is indispensable in any kitchen.”
  • In a business context, a person might say, “Strong communication skills are indispensable for success in the workplace.”
  • A traveler might describe a guidebook as indispensable when exploring a new city.
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17. Imperative

This slang term is used to describe something that is of utmost importance or urgency. It conveys a sense of necessity and emphasizes the critical nature of the situation or task.

  • For instance, in a team meeting, a manager might say, “It is imperative that we meet our sales targets this quarter.”
  • In a safety briefing, someone might stress, “Following the evacuation plan is imperative in case of a fire.”
  • A teacher might tell students, “It is imperative that you complete your homework assignments on time.”

18. Paramount

When something is considered paramount, it means it is the highest priority or most important. This slang term emphasizes that nothing else should take precedence over the identified item or concept.

  • For example, a coach might tell their team, “Winning this game is paramount to our chances of making it to the playoffs.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “My top priority is delivering high-quality work; it’s paramount to me.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Your safety is paramount. Always wear your seatbelt when riding in a car.”

19. Pressing

When something is pressing, it means it requires immediate attention or action. This slang term conveys a sense of urgency and emphasizes the need to address the matter promptly.

  • For instance, in a meeting, someone might say, “We have a pressing deadline for this project, so let’s focus on completing it.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might tell a patient, “Your symptoms are concerning and require a pressing evaluation.”
  • A student might say, “I have a pressing need to study for my upcoming exam.”

20. Urgent

This slang term is used to describe something that requires immediate action or attention. It emphasizes the need for prompt response or completion and conveys a sense of importance and time sensitivity.

  • For example, in an email subject line, someone might write, “Urgent: Response needed by end of day.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might say, “We have an urgent request from a client; please prioritize it.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “There is an urgent class announcement: the due date for the assignment has been moved up.”

21. Timely

Refers to something that is happening or relevant at the present time. It suggests that the information or action is appropriate and well-suited to the current circumstances.

  • For example, “We need to address this issue in a timely manner to avoid further complications.”
  • In a discussion about news articles, someone might say, “That’s a very timely piece considering recent events.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “Thanks for sharing this timely reminder.”

22. Topical

Refers to something that is of current interest or importance. It suggests that the subject matter is connected to or applicable to the current situation or discussion.

  • For instance, “Let’s focus on topical issues that are affecting our community.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “I believe this point is more topical and relevant to the topic at hand.”
  • A person might say, “I appreciate your input, but let’s stay on topic and discuss something more topical.”

23. Apposite

Means suitable or apt in the current context. It suggests that the information or idea is fitting and appropriate for the situation.

  • For example, “Her comment was apposite to the discussion, bringing up an important point.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “I think we should consider this apposite solution to address the problem.”
  • A person might compliment another’s contribution by saying, “That was an apposite example that perfectly illustrates the concept.”

24. Fitting

Means appropriate or suitable in a particular situation. It suggests that the action or decision is in line with what is expected or required.

  • For instance, “His response was fitting given the circumstances.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I think this course of action is fitting for the current situation.”
  • A person might comment on a choice, “That outfit is fitting for the occasion.”

25. Valid

Means legally or logically acceptable. It suggests that the information or argument is well-founded and based on sound reasoning or evidence.

  • For example, “Your concerns are valid and should be taken into consideration.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “I believe this point is valid and worth further exploration.”
  • A person might respond to a question, “Yes, your driver’s license is still valid for another year.”

26. Proper

When something is “proper,” it means that it is correct or appropriate in a given context. It can also imply that something is done in a formal or traditional manner.

  • For example, if someone is dressed very nicely for a formal event, you might say, “Wow, you look proper!”
  • In a discussion about etiquette, someone might say, “It’s important to behave in a proper manner at a fancy dinner.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Make sure to use proper grammar in your essays.”

27. Suitable

When something is “suitable,” it means that it is appropriate or fitting for a particular purpose or situation. It implies that something matches the requirements or expectations.

  • For instance, if someone is looking for a job and they find one that aligns perfectly with their skills and interests, you might say, “That job is suitable for you.”
  • In a conversation about clothing, someone might say, “I need to find a suitable outfit for the wedding.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Choose a suitable topic for your research project.”

28. Adequate

When something is “adequate,” it means that it is sufficient or satisfactory for a particular purpose. It implies that something meets the minimum requirements or standards.

  • For example, if someone asks if the amount of food you have is enough for everyone at the party, you might say, “Yes, it’s adequate.”
  • In a discussion about job performance, a manager might say, “Your work is adequate, but I think you can do better.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “You need to study more to achieve adequate results on the test.”

29. Decisive

When something is “decisive,” it means that it is conclusive or settling an issue. It implies that something is able to make a final or critical decision.

  • For instance, if someone is able to make a quick and firm decision in a difficult situation, you might say, “That was a decisive move.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “The team’s decisive victory secured their spot in the playoffs.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “You need to make a decisive choice for your career path.”

30. Meaningful

When something is “meaningful,” it means that it has a purpose or importance. It implies that something has a deep or significant value.

  • For example, if someone gives you a thoughtful gift that represents a special memory, you might say, “This is a meaningful present.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “I want to have a meaningful connection with my partner.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Make sure your essay has a meaningful conclusion that ties back to your main argument.”

31. Weighty

When something is described as “weighty,” it means that it carries a lot of importance or significance. It can refer to a topic, a decision, or a piece of information.

  • For example, “The CEO’s weighty announcement left everyone in the company on edge.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might say, “This issue is weighty and requires careful consideration.”
  • A journalist might write, “The weighty evidence presented in the trial led to a guilty verdict.”

32. Momentous

When something is described as “momentous,” it means that it is a highly significant or impactful event. It often refers to a moment or occasion that marks a major change or milestone.

  • For instance, “The signing of the peace treaty was a momentous occasion for the two warring nations.”
  • A historian might describe a certain event as “a momentous turning point in history.”
  • A person reflecting on their life might say, “Graduating from college was a momentous achievement for me.”

33. Noteworthy

When something is described as “noteworthy,” it means that it is deserving of attention or recognition. It often refers to something that stands out or is particularly impressive.

  • For example, “The artist’s latest album is filled with noteworthy tracks.”
  • A film critic might write, “The actress delivers a noteworthy performance that should not be overlooked.”
  • A teacher might praise a student’s work by saying, “Your essay contains many noteworthy insights.”

34. Pointed

When something is described as “pointed,” it means that it is direct and to the point. It often refers to a statement or remark that is clear and unambiguous.

  • For instance, “Her pointed question left him speechless.”
  • In a debate, someone might make a pointed argument by saying, “The facts speak for themselves.”
  • A journalist might describe an interview as “filled with pointed questions and honest answers.”
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35. Focused

When someone is described as “focused,” it means that they are concentrated and attentive. It often refers to someone who is fully engaged in a task or goal.

  • For example, “She was laser-focused on achieving her fitness goals.”
  • A coach might praise a player by saying, “You were incredibly focused during the game.”
  • A student might describe their study habits as “focused and disciplined.”

36. Telling

This term refers to something that reveals or indicates important information or details. It can also be used to describe someone who is openly sharing personal or sensitive information.

  • For example, in a gossip conversation, someone might say, “She was really telling about her ex-boyfriend.”
  • In a discussion about a crime investigation, a detective might comment, “The evidence found at the scene is very telling.”
  • A friend might say, “I appreciate you being so telling about your struggles. It helps me understand and support you better.”