Top 32 Slang For Edit – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to navigating the world of editing, it’s crucial to stay up-to-date with the latest slang for edit. From cutting-edge techniques to trendy terminology, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we unveil a curated list of the most popular editing jargon that will take your editing game to the next level. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to brush up on your editing lingo and impress your peers with your newfound knowledge!

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1. Redo

To redo something means to do it again or start over from the beginning. It is often used in the context of making changes or improvements to a project or piece of work.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I need to redo this paragraph to make it more concise.”
  • In a video editing context, someone might comment, “The lighting in this scene is off. We’ll need to redo it.”
  • A designer might say, “Let’s redo the layout of this website to make it more user-friendly.”

2. Revamp

To revamp something means to make significant changes or improvements to it in order to update or modernize it. It is often used in the context of redesigning or reorganizing something.

  • For instance, a company might revamp their logo to give it a fresh new look.
  • A fashion designer might revamp an old dress to create a trendy new piece.
  • A website might undergo a revamp to improve its functionality and user experience.

3. Touch up

To touch up something means to make small adjustments or improvements to it, typically to enhance its appearance or quality. It is often used in the context of editing photos or making minor changes to a project.

  • For example, a photographer might touch up a portrait to remove blemishes or adjust the lighting.
  • A writer might touch up a sentence to make it flow better.
  • A painter might touch up a painting to add some final details.

4. Refine

To refine something means to improve or perfect it by making small changes or adjustments. It is often used in the context of editing or revising a piece of work.

  • For instance, a chef might refine a recipe by adjusting the measurements or ingredients.
  • A writer might refine their manuscript by reworking certain passages.
  • A designer might refine a logo by tweaking the colors or proportions.

5. Enhance

To enhance something means to make it better or more valuable by adding or improving certain aspects. It is often used in the context of editing or modifying something to make it more appealing or effective.

  • For example, a photographer might enhance a photo by adjusting the brightness and contrast.
  • A filmmaker might enhance a scene with special effects or sound design.
  • A graphic designer might enhance a logo by adding more vibrant colors or sharper lines.

6. Fine-tune

This term refers to making small adjustments or improvements to something in order to achieve the desired result. It is often used in the context of editing to describe the process of making minor changes to a piece of content to improve its quality or effectiveness.

  • For example, a photographer might say, “I need to fine-tune the exposure on this photo before I can print it.”
  • In a discussion about music production, someone might mention, “The producer spent hours fine-tuning the mix to get it just right.”
  • A writer might say, “I’m going to fine-tune this paragraph to make it more concise and impactful.”

7. Clean up

This term refers to the act of improving or polishing something by removing errors, inconsistencies, or unnecessary elements. In the context of editing, it often involves reviewing and revising content to ensure clarity, coherence, and correctness.

  • For instance, a teacher might tell a student, “You need to clean up your essay by fixing the grammar mistakes.”
  • In a discussion about video editing, someone might say, “I spent hours cleaning up the footage to remove any unwanted background noise.”
  • A content creator might mention, “I always clean up my blog posts before publishing them to ensure they are error-free.”

8. Fix up

This term refers to the act of correcting or repairing something that is flawed, damaged, or not functioning properly. In the context of editing, it often involves addressing issues or errors in a piece of content to improve its quality or readability.

  • For example, a proofreader might say, “I need to fix up these typos before the document goes to print.”
  • In a discussion about website development, someone might mention, “I’m going to fix up the layout to make it more user-friendly.”
  • A writer might say, “I received feedback on my manuscript, so now I need to fix up some plot holes.”

9. Revisit

This term refers to the act of reviewing or reconsidering something that has been previously discussed, decided, or worked on. In the context of editing, it often involves going back to a piece of content to reevaluate its structure, content, or overall message.

  • For instance, a filmmaker might say, “We need to revisit the editing of that scene to improve the pacing.”
  • In a discussion about a research paper, someone might mention, “I need to revisit the introduction to make it more engaging.”
  • A content strategist might say, “Let’s revisit our content strategy to ensure it aligns with our current goals.”

10. Amend

This term refers to making modifications or changes to something, often in order to improve or correct it. In the context of editing, it often involves revising a piece of content by adding, removing, or modifying elements to enhance its clarity, accuracy, or effectiveness.

  • For example, a legal writer might say, “I need to amend this contract to include the new terms.”
  • In a discussion about graphic design, someone might mention, “I’m going to amend the color palette to better match the brand.”
  • A blogger might say, “I received feedback on my article, so now I need to amend the introduction to make it more compelling.”

11. Censor

– For example, a movie might be censored to remove explicit content before it is suitable for a younger audience.

  • In online forums, comments or posts that violate the community guidelines may be censored or removed.
  • A news article might undergo censorship to ensure that sensitive information is not disclosed.
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12. Cut

– For instance, a film editor might cut out scenes that are not essential to the storyline.

  • In video editing software, users can easily cut and rearrange clips to create a cohesive final product.
  • A podcast editor might cut out sections of an interview that are not relevant to the topic.

13. Alter

– For example, a photo editor might alter the colors or lighting of an image to enhance its appearance.

  • In writing, authors often alter their drafts multiple times before publishing the final version.
  • A video editor might alter the speed or playback of a clip to create a desired effect.

14. Reedit

– For instance, a filmmaker might reedit a movie based on feedback from test screenings.

  • In the world of online content, creators may reedit their videos or articles to address errors or improve the overall quality.
  • A book editor might ask an author to reedit certain chapters to strengthen the narrative.

15. Overhaul

– For example, a website designer might overhaul the layout and design of a website to improve user experience.

  • In film editing, an overhaul could involve reordering scenes, changing the soundtrack, and even adding or removing entire sequences.
  • A magazine editor might overhaul the content and format of the publication to attract a new audience.

16. Rework

This term refers to making significant changes or alterations to a piece of content. It implies that the original version needed substantial revisions or improvements.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I need to rework this paragraph to clarify my point.”
  • In a creative project, someone might suggest, “Let’s rework the ending to make it more impactful.”
  • A filmmaker might decide to rework a scene after receiving feedback from test audiences.

17. Tailor

To “tailor” something means to modify or adjust it to fit a specific purpose or audience. In the context of editing, it involves making changes to meet specific requirements or preferences.

  • For instance, a designer might say, “I need to tailor this logo for the client’s brand.”
  • An editor might suggest, “Let’s tailor the language in this article to appeal to a younger audience.”
  • A video editor might explain, “I’m going to tailor this video to fit the desired length and tone.”

18. Rehash

When content is “rehashed,” it means that it is being repeated or restated without much originality or significant changes. It often implies that the material has been reused or recycled.

  • For example, a reviewer might criticize a movie by saying, “It’s just a rehash of the original, with nothing new to offer.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might comment, “The author tends to rehash the same themes in their novels.”
  • A music critic might write, “The band’s latest album feels like a rehash of their previous work.”

19. Re-edit

To “re-edit” means to make further edits or revisions to a piece of content that has already been edited. It suggests that additional changes are necessary to improve the final version.

  • For instance, a video editor might say, “I need to re-edit this scene to improve the pacing.”
  • In a publishing context, someone might explain, “We discovered some errors in the manuscript, so we need to re-edit before printing.”
  • A photographer might decide to re-edit a set of photos to achieve a different aesthetic or mood.
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20. Reformat

This term refers to altering the layout or structure of a piece of content. It involves making changes to the formatting elements, such as font styles, spacing, or page layout.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I’m going to reformat this document to make it easier to read.”
  • In a web design context, someone might suggest, “Let’s reformat the page to improve its mobile responsiveness.”
  • A graphic designer might explain, “I need to reformat this brochure to fit the client’s brand guidelines.”

21. Reconstruct

This term refers to the process of completely overhauling or rebuilding something. In the context of editing, it means making significant changes to the structure or content of a piece of writing.

  • For example, an editor might say, “This paragraph is confusing, let’s reconstruct it to improve clarity.”
  • In a discussion about editing techniques, someone might suggest, “Sometimes it’s necessary to reconstruct an entire chapter to improve the flow of the story.”
  • A writer might ask for help, saying, “I’m not sure how to fix this section, can you help me reconstruct it?”

22. Reconfigure

This term refers to the act of changing the arrangement or organization of something. In the context of editing, it means rearranging the structure or components of a piece of writing.

  • For instance, an editor might suggest, “We need to reconfigure the order of these paragraphs to improve the flow.”
  • In a writing workshop, someone might say, “I think you should reconfigure the scenes in your story to create a stronger narrative arc.”
  • A writer might seek advice, asking, “How can I reconfigure this section to make it more engaging?”

23. Reorganize

This term refers to the action of rearranging or regrouping elements in a systematic or logical order. In the context of editing, it means restructuring the organization or layout of a piece of writing.

  • For example, an editor might suggest, “Let’s reorganize these sections to create a more coherent argument.”
  • In a discussion about writing strategies, someone might recommend, “Before starting the editing process, it’s helpful to reorganize your thoughts and ideas.”
  • A writer might express frustration, saying, “I need to reorganize this chapter, but I’m not sure where to start.”

24. Reorder

This term refers to changing the sequence or order of something. In the context of editing, it means rearranging the placement or order of elements in a piece of writing.

  • For instance, an editor might suggest, “Let’s reorder these paragraphs to create a more logical progression.”
  • In a workshop discussion, someone might advise, “Consider reordering the scenes in your story to build tension and suspense.”
  • A writer might seek feedback, asking, “Does it make sense to reorder these two sections for better flow?”

25. Rephrase

This term refers to expressing or stating something in a different way. In the context of editing, it means rewriting or paraphrasing a sentence, phrase, or passage to improve clarity or style.

  • For example, an editor might say, “This sentence is awkward, let’s rephrase it to make it more concise.”
  • In a writing group, someone might offer suggestions, saying, “You could rephrase this dialogue to make the character’s voice more authentic.”
  • A writer might seek advice, asking, “Can you help me rephrase this paragraph to make it more engaging?”

26. Reword

To rephrase or restructure a sentence or passage in order to convey the same meaning in different words or language. “Reword” is often used when someone wants to make a statement clearer or more concise.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “You need to reword this paragraph to avoid plagiarism.”
  • A writer might ask for feedback, saying, “Can you help me reword this sentence to make it sound more professional?”
  • In a writing workshop, a participant might suggest, “I think you should reword this section to make it flow better.”

27. Rewrite

To make changes to a piece of writing, usually in order to improve it or make it more accurate. “Rewrite” implies a more extensive revision than simply rewording.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I need to rewrite this article to include the latest information.”
  • An editor might suggest, “You should rewrite this paragraph to provide more context.”
  • A student might ask for help, saying, “I’m struggling to rewrite this essay. Can you give me some advice?”

28. Fix

To make repairs or adjustments to a piece of writing in order to eliminate errors or improve its quality. “Fix” is a more general term that can refer to any type of editing or revision.

  • For example, a proofreader might say, “I found several typos that need to be fixed.”
  • A writer might admit, “I need to fix the pacing in this chapter.”
  • A blogger might ask for feedback, saying, “Can you help me fix the formatting on this post?”

29. Update

To bring something up to date or make it current. “Update” is often used when new information or developments need to be added to a piece of writing.

  • For instance, a website might display a message saying, “This page is being updated. Please check back later.”
  • A journalist might say, “I need to update this article with the latest statistics.”
  • A blogger might inform readers, “I’ve updated this post with new information. Take a look!”

30. Upgrade

To enhance or make something better than its previous version. “Upgrade” is often used when referring to improving the quality or functionality of a piece of writing.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I need to upgrade my vocabulary to make my writing more sophisticated.”
  • An editor might suggest, “You should upgrade the structure of this article to make it more engaging.”
  • A student might ask for advice, saying, “How can I upgrade my essay to get a higher grade?”

31. Rectify

To correct or remedy a mistake or error. “Rectify” is often used when referring to making changes or adjustments to a document or piece of work.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Please rectify the spelling errors in your essay.”
  • In a professional setting, a manager might ask, “Can you rectify the formatting issues in this report?”
  • A writer might comment, “I need to rectify the plot hole in my novel before submitting it.”

32. Realign

To make changes or readjustments to something, especially in terms of structure or organization. “Realign” is often used when referring to making edits to a project or plan.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “We need to realign our goals for the upcoming quarter.”
  • In a team meeting, a member might suggest, “Let’s realign our strategy to better meet the client’s needs.”
  • A writer might discuss, “I had to realign the chapters in my book to improve the flow of the story.”