Top 50 Slang For Populations – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to understanding the unique language and expressions used by different populations, we’ve got you covered. From urban neighborhoods to online communities, each group has its own set of slang that can sometimes leave outsiders feeling a bit lost. But fear not, as we’ve compiled a list of the coolest and most relevant slang terms that will have you feeling like a local in no time. Get ready to expand your linguistic horizons and dive into the fascinating world of slang for populations!

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1. Peeps

This term is a slang word for “people” and is often used to refer to a group of friends or acquaintances. It is a casual way of addressing a group of individuals.

  • For example, “Hey, what are you and your peeps up to tonight?”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might ask, “Are all your peeps coming?”
  • A person might say, “I love hanging out with my peeps on the weekends.”

2. Folks

This word is a colloquial term for “people” and is often used to refer to a specific group or community. It is a casual way of addressing a group of individuals.

  • For instance, “I’m going to visit my folks this weekend.”
  • In a discussion about family, someone might ask, “How are your folks doing?”
  • A person might say, “I’m grateful for the support of my folks.”

3. Squad

This term refers to a close-knit group of friends or teammates. It is often used to convey a sense of camaraderie and loyalty among the members.

  • For example, “I’m going out with my squad tonight.”
  • In a conversation about a sports team, someone might say, “Our squad is really strong this season.”
  • A person might post a photo with their friends on social media and caption it, “Squad goals.”

4. Crew

This word refers to a group of people who work together or share a common interest or goal. It is often used to describe a team or collective.

  • For instance, “I’m part of the film crew.”
  • In a discussion about a music band, someone might say, “The crew has been together for years.”
  • A person might invite others to join their crew for a project or event.

5. Tribe

This term is used to describe a close-knit community or group of people who share common beliefs, values, or interests. It often conveys a sense of belonging and unity among the members.

  • For example, “I found my tribe at the yoga studio.”
  • In a conversation about cultural identity, someone might say, “I feel connected to my tribe.”
  • A person might describe their group of friends as their tribe.

6. Homies

This term is often used to refer to a group of friends or people who share a strong bond. It can also be used to describe a group of individuals who belong to the same community or neighborhood.

  • For example, “I’m going out with my homies tonight.”
  • A person might say, “These are my homies, we’ve known each other since childhood.”
  • In a conversation about a neighborhood, someone might say, “The homies from the block always have each other’s backs.”

7. Squad Goals

This phrase is used to describe a group of friends who are seen as the ideal or have qualities that others aspire to have in their own friend groups. It often refers to a group of friends who are stylish, successful, and have a strong bond.

  • For instance, “Their group is so cool, they are total squad goals.”
  • A person might say, “I wish my friends and I had such strong chemistry, we need to work on our squad goals.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “Having a supportive and fun squad is definitely one of my life goals.”

8. Posse

This term is often used to refer to a group of individuals who are united by a common interest or goal. It can also be used to describe a group of friends or associates who are loyal to each other and have each other’s backs.

  • For example, “They rolled into town with their posse by their side.”
  • A person might say, “I always have my posse with me, we never go anywhere alone.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “You can always count on your posse to have your back in tough times.”

9. Fam

This term is often used to refer to a person’s close friends or family members. It is a shortened form of the word “family” and is used to express a strong bond and loyalty among the group.

  • For instance, “I’m hanging out with my fam this weekend.”
  • A person might say, “These are my fam, we’re like brothers and sisters.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “Your fam will always be there for you, no matter what.”

10. Gang

This term is often used to refer to a group of individuals who come together and associate with each other, often for a specific purpose or shared interest. It can also be used to describe a group of friends or associates who are loyal to each other and have a strong bond.

  • For example, “They formed a gang to fight against injustice.”
  • A person might say, “I’m part of a gang of artists, we support and inspire each other.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “Having a gang of friends who have your back is priceless.”

11. Mob

A large, often unruly or disorderly crowd or collection of people. “Mob” can also refer to a criminal organization or gang.

  • For instance, during a protest, you might hear, “The mob gathered in the streets demanding justice.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might say, “The mob has been involved in illegal activities for decades.”
  • A journalist reporting on a riot might write, “The mob vandalized several buildings and looted stores.”

12. Clan

A group of people who are related by blood or marriage and who share a common ancestry. “Clan” can also refer to a close-knit group of friends or associates.

  • For example, someone might say, “I come from a large clan with relatives all over the world.”
  • In a discussion about loyalty, a person might say, “My friends are like my clan. We always have each other’s backs.”
  • A historian might explain, “Clans played a significant role in ancient societies, providing support and protection for their members.”

13. Clique

A small, exclusive group of people who share similar interests or social status. “Clique” often carries a negative connotation, suggesting a group that is exclusionary or cliquish.

  • For instance, a teenager might say, “I don’t fit in with any of the cliques at my school.”
  • In a discussion about workplace dynamics, someone might say, “The management team formed a clique, making it difficult for others to have their voices heard.”
  • A social psychologist might explain, “Cliques serve as a way for individuals to establish a sense of belonging and identity within a larger social context.”

14. Pack

A group of animals or people that travel, work, or live together. “Pack” can also refer to a group of cigarettes or a bundle of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “The wolf pack hunted together, using their collective strength to take down prey.”
  • In a discussion about backpacking, a person might say, “I joined a pack of fellow travelers and we explored the world together.”
  • A person discussing finances might say, “I saved up a pack of cash to buy a new car.”

15. Horde

A large, unruly, or disorderly group of people or animals. “Horde” often implies a sense of chaos or overwhelming numbers.

  • For instance, during a music festival, you might hear, “The horde of fans rushed towards the stage when the band started playing.”
  • In a discussion about video games, someone might say, “The horde of enemies was impossible to defeat without a strategy.”
  • A historian might explain, “The Mongol horde was a formidable force that conquered vast territories in Asia and Europe.”

16. Masses

This term refers to a large group of people or the general population. It is often used to describe a large gathering or the common people as a whole.

  • For example, a politician might say, “I will fight for the rights of the masses.”
  • In a protest, a chant might be, “Power to the masses!”
  • A journalist might write, “The event attracted thousands from the local masses.”

17. Population

This term refers to the total number of people living in a specific area. It is often used in discussions or studies about demographics and statistics.

  • For instance, a researcher might say, “The population of this city has been steadily increasing.”
  • In a debate about urban planning, someone might argue, “We need to consider the impact on the population.”
  • A teacher might ask, “What is the population of this country?”

18. Community

This term refers to a group of people who live in the same area or share common interests. It is often used to describe a sense of belonging and support among individuals.

  • For example, a community organizer might say, “We need to come together as a community to solve this issue.”
  • In a discussion about neighborhood safety, someone might suggest, “We should organize a community watch.”
  • A member of a tight-knit community might say, “I love living in this close-knit community!”

19. Locals

This term refers to the people who live in a specific area or locality. It is often used to differentiate between residents and visitors or tourists.

  • For instance, a tour guide might say, “Now let’s hear from one of the locals.”
  • In a conversation about the best places to eat, someone might recommend, “Ask the locals for their favorite spots.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Where can I meet some friendly locals?”

20. Residents

This term refers to the people who live in a particular place or location. It is a more formal way to describe the population or inhabitants of an area.

  • For example, a real estate agent might say, “This neighborhood is popular among young residents.”
  • In a discussion about city planning, someone might mention, “The residents have been asking for more green spaces.”
  • A member of a condominium association might say, “We need to vote on this issue as residents of this building.”

21. Denizens

This term refers to the people who live in a particular place or environment. It is often used to describe a group of individuals who are considered to be permanent or long-term inhabitants.

  • For example, “The denizens of the small town were known for their friendliness.”
  • In a discussion about a specific neighborhood, someone might say, “The denizens of this area are passionate about preserving its historic charm.”
  • A writer might describe a bustling city as “a melting pot of denizens from all walks of life.”
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22. Inhabitants

This word is used to describe the people who live in a specific area or region. It can refer to both permanent and temporary residents.

  • For instance, “The inhabitants of the island rely on fishing for their livelihood.”
  • In a conversation about urban planning, someone might mention, “The city needs to provide better infrastructure for its growing number of inhabitants.”
  • A travel blogger might write, “The inhabitants of this remote village have preserved their traditional way of life.”

23. Citizens

This term refers to individuals who are recognized as legal members of a particular country, state, or city. It implies certain rights and responsibilities that come with being a part of a specific community.

  • For example, “The citizens of this country have the right to vote.”
  • In a discussion about civic engagement, someone might say, “It is important for citizens to participate in local government.”
  • A news article might report, “The citizens of this town rallied together to support a local charity.”

24. Occupants

This word is used to describe individuals who are currently residing in a particular place or environment. It can refer to both permanent and temporary residents.

  • For instance, “The occupants of the building were evacuated due to a fire.”
  • In a conversation about housing, someone might mention, “The occupants of this apartment complex enjoy access to a swimming pool.”
  • A real estate agent might advertise a property as “ideal for families or working professionals seeking a comfortable space for occupants.”

25. Dwellers

This term refers to people who live in a specific location or environment. It is often used to describe individuals who have chosen to make a particular place their home.

  • For example, “The city dwellers enjoy the convenience of having numerous amenities within walking distance.”
  • In a discussion about urbanization, someone might say, “The number of city dwellers has increased significantly in the past decade.”
  • A travel guide might describe a remote village as “a hidden gem for nature lovers and solitude-seeking dwellers.”

26. Natives

This term refers to the people who are originally from a particular place or region. It is often used to distinguish them from newcomers or outsiders.

  • For example, a tourist might ask a native for recommendations on local attractions.
  • In a conversation about cultural traditions, someone might say, “The natives have been practicing this ritual for centuries.”
  • A resident might refer to themselves as a native when discussing their hometown with someone from another city.
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27. Settlers

This term refers to the people who establish a new community or civilization in a previously uninhabited or sparsely populated area. It is often used to describe the early inhabitants of a particular region.

  • For instance, a history book might mention the settlers who first colonized a certain territory.
  • In a discussion about westward expansion in the United States, someone might mention the hardships faced by the settlers.
  • A person might use the term to describe their ancestors who migrated to a new country and built a life there.

28. Villagers

This term refers to the people who live in a village, which is a small community in a rural area. It is often used to describe the residents of a small town or countryside.

  • For example, a local newspaper might feature stories about the villagers and their daily lives.
  • In a conversation about community events, someone might say, “The villagers are organizing a summer fair.”
  • A person might refer to themselves as a villager when discussing the tight-knit nature of their community.

29. Townsfolk

This term refers to the people who live in a town or city. It is often used to describe the collective population of a particular urban area.

  • For instance, a town meeting might be held to address the concerns of the townsfolk.
  • In a discussion about local politics, someone might say, “The townsfolk have elected a new mayor.”
  • A person might use the term when referring to the diverse group of individuals who make up their community.

30. City-dwellers

This term refers to the people who reside in a city or urban area. It is often used to describe the population of a bustling metropolitan area.

  • For example, a magazine article might discuss the challenges faced by city-dwellers in terms of housing and transportation.
  • In a conversation about cultural amenities, someone might say, “City-dwellers have access to a wide range of museums and theaters.”
  • A person might use the term when discussing the fast-paced lifestyle and opportunities available to those living in a city.

31. Urbanites

This term refers to people who live in urban areas, typically cities or densely populated areas. Urbanites are often associated with a fast-paced lifestyle and a preference for city amenities.

  • For example, a person might say, “I love the energy of the city. I’m a true urbanite.”
  • In a discussion about urban living, someone might comment, “Urbanites have access to a wide range of cultural and entertainment options.”
  • A city resident might complain, “Parking is always a challenge for urbanites.”

32. Suburbanites

Suburbanites are individuals who live in the suburbs, which are residential areas located outside of cities. Suburban living is often characterized by a quieter and more family-oriented lifestyle compared to urban living.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I prefer the tranquility of suburban living over the hustle and bustle of the city.”
  • In a conversation about housing, a person might mention, “Suburbanites often have more space and larger yards compared to urban dwellers.”
  • A suburban resident might comment, “I enjoy the sense of community among suburbanites.”

33. Ruralites

This term refers to people who live in rural areas, which are sparsely populated regions located outside of urban and suburban areas. Ruralites are often associated with a slower-paced lifestyle and a closer connection to nature.

  • For example, someone might say, “I grew up in a small town. I’m a true ruralite.”
  • In a discussion about agriculture, a person might mention, “Ruralites often have a strong connection to farming and agriculture.”
  • A rural resident might comment, “Ruralites value the sense of community and neighborly support.”

34. Islanders

Islanders are individuals who live on islands, which are landmasses surrounded by water. Island living often comes with a unique set of challenges and advantages, such as limited access to resources and a close-knit community.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I love the peacefulness of being an islander.”
  • In a conversation about tourism, a person might mention, “Islanders often rely on tourism as a major source of income.”
  • An island resident might comment, “Islanders have a strong sense of community and take pride in their island’s culture.”

35. Nomads

Nomads are people who have no fixed home and constantly move from place to place. They often live a nomadic lifestyle, traveling in search of resources, opportunities, or cultural experiences.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve always been drawn to the life of a nomad, constantly exploring new places.”
  • In a discussion about travel, a person might mention, “Nomads often have a deep appreciation for different cultures and ways of life.”
  • A person interested in minimalism might comment, “Nomads embrace a minimalist lifestyle, carrying only what they need on their journeys.”

36. Migrants

This term refers to people who move from one place to another, often in search of better opportunities or to escape difficult circumstances. It can include people who move within their own country or across international borders.

  • For example, “The city has seen an increase in migrants from rural areas looking for work.”
  • In a discussion about immigration policies, someone might say, “We need to find a way to support migrants while also protecting our borders.”
  • A news article might report, “Migrants are often vulnerable to exploitation and discrimination in their new communities.”

37. Expats

This term refers to people who live outside their native country. They are usually living abroad for work or other personal reasons, and may plan to return to their home country at some point.

  • For instance, “There is a large community of expats in this city, working for international companies.”
  • In a discussion about cultural differences, someone might say, “Expats often experience culture shock when they first move to a new country.”
  • An expat might share their experience by saying, “Living as an expat has allowed me to broaden my horizons and experience different cultures.”

38. Refugees

Refugees are individuals who have been forced to flee their home country due to violence, persecution, or other threats to their safety. They seek refuge in another country and often have to leave behind their homes, possessions, and sometimes even their families.

  • For example, “The country is providing aid to refugees fleeing the war-torn region.”
  • In a discussion about humanitarian efforts, someone might say, “It’s crucial to provide support and resources for refugees during their resettlement.”
  • A news article might report, “Refugees face many challenges when adapting to a new culture and rebuilding their lives.”

39. Immigrants

Immigrants are individuals who choose to move to a different country to settle and establish a new life. They often seek better economic opportunities, reunite with family members, or escape political unrest or persecution in their home country.

  • For instance, “The city has a diverse population thanks to the influx of immigrants from various countries.”
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, someone might say, “Immigrants bring unique perspectives and contribute to the richness of our society.”
  • An immigrant might share their experience by saying, “Moving to a new country as an immigrant can be both exciting and challenging.”

40. Nationals

This term refers to individuals who are recognized as legal members of a particular country. They have citizenship rights and are entitled to the benefits and protections provided by their government.

  • For example, “The new law will affect both nationals and foreigners living in the country.”
  • In a discussion about voting rights, someone might say, “Only nationals are eligible to vote in national elections.”
  • A news article might report, “Nationals are encouraged to participate in civic activities and contribute to the development of their country.”

41. Countrymen

This term refers to people who share the same nationality or citizenship. It is often used to evoke a sense of unity or patriotism.

  • For example, during a speech, a politician might say, “My fellow countrymen, we must work together to overcome these challenges.”
  • In a historical context, a writer might refer to a group of people as “countrymen” to emphasize their shared heritage.
  • A person discussing national pride might say, “I am proud to stand with my countrymen in times of need.”

42. Compatriots

Similar to “countrymen,” this term refers to people who share the same nationality or citizenship. It is often used to emphasize a sense of camaraderie or shared experiences.

  • For instance, during an international sports event, a commentator might say, “The team is supported by thousands of compatriots who have traveled to cheer them on.”
  • In a discussion about immigration, someone might say, “We should welcome our compatriots who are seeking a better life in our country.”
  • A person reflecting on their home country might say, “I miss the warmth and hospitality of my compatriots.”

43. Fellowmen

This term is a more general way to refer to people who share a common identity or belong to the same group. It can be used to evoke a sense of unity or solidarity.

  • For example, during a speech advocating for social justice, a speaker might say, “We must fight for the rights of our fellowmen.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, a coach might say, “We need to support and uplift our fellowmen on and off the field.”
  • A person expressing empathy might say, “I understand the struggles of my fellowmen and stand in solidarity with them.”

44. Co-citizens

Similar to “countrymen” and “compatriots,” this term specifically refers to people who share the same citizenship. It is often used to highlight a sense of belonging or shared responsibilities.

  • For instance, in a political debate, a participant might say, “We need to prioritize the needs of our co-citizens before anything else.”
  • In a discussion about community engagement, someone might say, “We should all contribute to the betterment of our co-citizens.”
  • A person advocating for equal rights might say, “We must ensure that all our co-citizens have access to the same opportunities.”

45. Townies

This term is often used to refer to people who live in a specific town or community. It can carry a sense of familiarity or belonging.

  • For example, in a small town, someone might say, “The townies all gather at the local diner for breakfast.”
  • In a discussion about local events, a person might say, “The townies are excited about the upcoming festival.”
  • A person reminiscing about their hometown might say, “I miss the sense of community among the townies.”

46. City slickers

This term is used to refer to people who live in cities and are seen as sophisticated or polished. It can sometimes carry a negative connotation, implying that city dwellers are out of touch with rural or small-town life.

  • For example, in a conversation about different lifestyles, someone might say, “City slickers have access to so many amenities that we don’t have in the countryside.”
  • In a movie set in a rural area, a character might refer to the city dwellers visiting as “a bunch of city slickers.”
  • A person discussing the urban-rural divide might argue, “City slickers just don’t understand the challenges and joys of living in the country.”

47. Country folk

This term is used to refer to people who live in rural areas or the countryside. It often carries a positive connotation, suggesting a simpler or more down-to-earth way of life compared to city living.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Country folk know how to appreciate the beauty of nature.”
  • In a discussion about traditional values, a person might argue, “Country folk have a strong sense of community and family.”
  • A character in a novel set in a rural area might describe themselves as “just a country folk trying to make a living.”
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48. Tribesmen

This term is used to refer to individuals who belong to a specific tribe or indigenous group. It can denote a sense of belonging, cultural identity, and shared heritage.

  • For example, someone might say, “The tribesmen have a deep connection with the land and their ancestors.”
  • In a documentary about indigenous cultures, a narrator might explain, “The tribesmen have preserved their traditional way of life for generations.”
  • A person discussing cultural diversity might argue, “The tribesmen have a rich and unique cultural heritage that should be celebrated.”

49. Metropolitans

This term is used to refer to people who live in large cities or metropolitan areas. It often implies a cosmopolitan lifestyle, with access to diverse cultural experiences and amenities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Metropolitans have a wide range of dining options from different cuisines.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, a person might argue, “Metropolitans have more career options compared to small-town residents.”
  • A character in a novel set in a bustling city might describe themselves as “a true metropolitan,“a true metropolitan, always on the go.”

50. Tribespeople

This term is used to refer to individuals who belong to a specific tribe or indigenous group. Similar to “tribesmen,” it denotes a sense of belonging, cultural identity, and shared heritage.

  • For example, someone might say, “The tribespeople have a deep connection with their land and traditions.”
  • In a discussion about indigenous rights, a person might argue, “The tribespeople deserve recognition and protection of their ancestral lands.”
  • A documentary about tribal cultures might highlight the resilience and strength of tribespeople in preserving their way of life.