Top 66 Slang For Prepare – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to getting ready for a task or event, we all have our own ways of preparing. But did you know that there’s a whole world of slang words and phrases used to describe this process? From getting “game-ready” to “gearing up,” we’ve rounded up the top slang for prepare that will have you feeling ready to take on anything. So, whether you’re a procrastinator or a planner, get ready to level up your vocabulary and add some flair to your everyday conversations.

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1. Gear up

This phrase means to prepare oneself or gather the necessary equipment for a task or activity. It is often used in situations where there is a need for readiness or to be fully equipped.

  • For example, before a big game, a coach might say, “It’s time to gear up and give it your all.”
  • In a military context, a commander might order, “Gear up, soldiers! We have a mission to complete.”
  • A friend might advise, “Make sure to gear up with warm clothing before going skiing in the mountains.”

2. Get set

This phrase is used to indicate that one is ready and prepared to begin a specific activity or event. It is often used in situations where there is a need for anticipation or readiness.

  • For instance, before a race, the announcer might say, “Runners, get set!”
  • In a game of tennis, a player might announce, “Get set, here comes my serve!”
  • A teacher might instruct the students, “Get set for the next lesson. We will be discussing a new topic.”

3. Buckle down

This expression means to concentrate and put in a serious effort to accomplish a task or goal. It implies the need for determination and dedication.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to buckle down and study for my upcoming exams.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might encourage the team, “Let’s buckle down and meet our project deadline.”
  • A friend might advise, “It’s time to buckle down and save money for that vacation we’ve been planning.”

4. Hunker down

This phrase means to settle in and get ready for a challenging or difficult situation. It often implies the need to take shelter or make preparations for a potential threat or adverse conditions.

  • For instance, during a storm, a weather report might advise, “Hunker down and stay indoors.”
  • In a survival situation, a guide might instruct, “Find a secure location and hunker down until help arrives.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Hunker down and focus on your studies. The exams are coming up.”

5. Get in the zone

This slang phrase refers to the state of being fully focused and mentally prepared for a task or activity. It implies a sense of concentration and being in the right mindset.

  • For example, before a performance, a musician might say, “I need to get in the zone to deliver my best.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might encourage the team, “Get in the zone and give it your all.”
  • A friend might advise, “Take a few deep breaths and get in the zone before your big presentation.”

6. Amp up

To increase the intensity or effort put into something. This phrase is often used to describe increasing one’s energy or focus.

  • For example, “I need to amp up my workout routine if I want to see results.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s amp up the energy at this party by playing some upbeat music.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “It’s time to amp up our performance and give it our all.”

7. Step up one’s game

To improve one’s performance or effort in a particular activity or situation. This phrase is often used to describe pushing oneself to do better or to meet higher standards.

  • For instance, “If you want to win the competition, you’ll need to step up your game.”
  • A student might say, “I need to step up my studying if I want to improve my grades.”
  • A manager might tell their employee, “It’s time to step up your game and take on more responsibilities.”

8. Get one’s ducks in a row

To get organized or prepared for a task or situation. This phrase is often used to describe getting everything in order or making sure all the necessary preparations have been made.

  • For example, “Before the meeting, I need to get my ducks in a row and review the agenda.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t start the project until I get my ducks in a row and gather all the necessary materials.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Before we leave for the trip, make sure you get your ducks in a row and pack everything you need.”

9. Prime oneself

To mentally or physically prepare oneself for a task or situation. This phrase is often used to describe getting into the right mindset or condition before taking action.

  • For instance, “Before the big game, I like to prime myself by visualizing success.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to prime myself for the presentation by practicing and rehearsing.”
  • A performer might say, “I always prime myself before going on stage by doing some vocal warm-ups.”

10. Get one’s act together

To become more organized or responsible in one’s actions or behavior. This phrase is often used to urge someone to improve their behavior or performance.

  • For example, “You need to get your act together and start meeting your deadlines.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “It’s time for you to get your act together and start taking your schoolwork more seriously.”
  • A friend might tell their friend, “If you want to succeed, you need to get your act together and stop procrastinating.”

11. Get one’s head in the game

This phrase means to mentally prepare oneself for a task or situation. It implies the need to concentrate and be fully engaged in order to perform well.

  • For example, a coach might say to a player, “You need to get your head in the game if you want to win.”
  • A teacher might advise a student, “Before the exam, take a deep breath and get your head in the game.”
  • A colleague might remind another, “We have an important meeting coming up, so let’s all get our heads in the game and be prepared.”

12. Get one’s house in order

This phrase means to get one’s affairs in order, to prepare oneself or one’s surroundings for a task or situation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to get my house in order before I start my new job.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “Let’s get our house in order before the big project deadline.”
  • A person preparing for a trip might say, “I need to get my house in order and pack my bags.”

13. Gather one’s thoughts

This phrase means to take time to think and organize one’s thoughts before speaking or taking action.

  • For example, someone might say, “Give me a moment to gather my thoughts before I respond.”
  • A student might take a deep breath and say, “I need to gather my thoughts before giving my presentation.”
  • During a brainstorming session, someone might suggest, “Let’s take a few minutes to gather our thoughts and then share our ideas.”

14. Set the stage

This phrase means to create the necessary conditions or environment for something to happen or be successful.

  • For instance, a director might say, “We need to set the stage for the play by arranging the props and scenery.”
  • A host might prepare the dining table and say, “I’m setting the stage for a memorable dinner party.”
  • A project manager might say, “Before we begin, let’s set the stage by clarifying our goals and expectations.”

15. Lay the groundwork

This phrase means to prepare the foundation or initial steps for something that will happen or be developed in the future.

  • For example, a business owner might say, “We need to lay the groundwork for our new product launch.”
  • A politician might work on building relationships and say, “I’m laying the groundwork for my upcoming campaign.”
  • A team leader might delegate tasks and say, “Let’s lay the groundwork for a successful project by assigning roles and responsibilities.”

16. Make ready

To get ready or make preparations for something. “Make ready” is a phrase that implies taking action to be prepared for a specific task or event.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Make ready for the big game tomorrow by practicing your skills.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Make ready for school by packing your backpack and laying out your clothes.”
  • A team leader might say, “We need to make ready for the upcoming project by organizing our resources and assigning tasks.”

17. Ready oneself

To prepare oneself for a particular situation or event. “Ready oneself” suggests taking personal action to be prepared mentally, physically, or emotionally.

  • For instance, before a job interview, someone might say, “I need to ready myself by researching the company and practicing my answers.”
  • A performer might say backstage, “I need a few minutes to ready myself before going on stage.”
  • A student might say, “I need to ready myself for the exam by reviewing my notes and studying.”

18. Gird one’s loins

This phrase is a metaphor derived from ancient times when men would tuck their long robes into a belt or girdle before engaging in physical activity. “Gird one’s loins” now means to prepare oneself mentally or emotionally for a challenging task or situation.

  • For example, before giving a speech, someone might say, “I need to gird my loins and overcome my fear of public speaking.”
  • A person preparing for a difficult conversation might say, “I have to gird my loins and gather my thoughts before addressing the issue.”
  • In a high-pressure situation, someone might say, “I’m girding my loins and getting ready to face whatever comes my way.”

19. Steel oneself

To mentally prepare oneself for a difficult or challenging situation. “Steel oneself” implies fortifying one’s mind or emotions to face adversity.

  • For instance, before a difficult exam, a student might say, “I need to steel myself and stay focused.”
  • A person preparing for a confrontation might say, “I have to steel myself for the difficult conversation ahead.”
  • In a high-stress situation, someone might say, “I’m steeling myself and getting ready to handle whatever comes my way.”

20. Prep oneself

To prepare oneself for a specific task or event. “Prep oneself” is a casual way of saying to get ready or make preparations.

  • For example, before a workout, someone might say, “I need to prep myself by stretching and hydrating.”
  • A person getting ready for a job interview might say, “I need to prep myself by practicing my responses and dressing professionally.”
  • A student preparing for a presentation might say, “I need to prep myself by rehearsing my speech and creating visual aids.”

21. Psych oneself up

This phrase means to mentally prepare oneself for a task or event, typically by building up confidence or motivation.

  • For example, before a big game, a coach might say, “It’s time to psych yourselves up and give it your all.”
  • A person getting ready to give a presentation might say, “I need to psych myself up and get in the right mindset.”
  • Someone preparing for an important job interview might tell themselves, “I’m going to psych myself up and show them why I’m the best candidate.”

22. Set oneself up for success

This expression means to make the necessary preparations or take the necessary steps to ensure a successful outcome.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I’m going to study hard and set myself up for success on this exam.”
  • A person starting a new business might say, “I want to set myself up for success by creating a solid business plan.”
  • Someone preparing for a marathon might say, “I need to set myself up for success by following a strict training schedule.”

23. Get one’s game face on

This phrase means to mentally prepare oneself for a competition or challenge by adopting a focused and determined attitude.

  • For example, before a basketball game, a player might say, “It’s time to get our game faces on and show them what we’re made of.”
  • A person preparing for a job interview might say, “I need to get my game face on and impress the interviewer.”
  • Someone getting ready to give a performance might say, “I’m going to get my game face on and give it everything I’ve got.”

24. Get one’s act in gear

This expression means to get organized, focused, and ready for a task or event.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to get my act in gear and start studying for the exam.”
  • A person preparing for a move might say, “I need to get my act in gear and start packing.”
  • Someone getting ready for a presentation might say, “I’m going to get my act in gear and practice my speech.”

25. Get one’s affairs in order

This phrase means to organize and take care of one’s responsibilities, tasks, or personal matters.

  • For example, before going on vacation, a person might say, “I need to get my affairs in order and make sure everything is taken care of.”
  • A person preparing for a major life change, such as retirement, might say, “I need to get my affairs in order and make sure my finances are in order.”
  • Someone getting ready to move to a new city might say, “I’m going to get my affairs in order and tie up any loose ends before I leave.”

26. Get one’s ducks in a line

This phrase means to get all of one’s tasks or responsibilities in order and ready to be completed. It implies a need for organization and planning.

  • For example, “Before starting the project, make sure to get your ducks in a line.”
  • A manager might say, “We need to get our ducks in a line before the big presentation.”
  • A friend might advise, “If you want to succeed, you have to get your ducks in a line.”

27. Get one’s head in the zone

This phrase means to mentally prepare oneself and get into a focused state of mind. It refers to being fully engaged and ready for a task or activity.

  • For instance, “Before the game, I need to get my head in the zone.”
  • A student might say, “I can’t study unless I get my head in the zone.”
  • A performer might explain, “To give my best performance, I have to get my head in the zone.”

28. Get one’s house in shape

This phrase means to get one’s affairs or personal life in order and ready for action. It implies the need for organization and preparation.

  • For example, “Before starting a new job, I need to get my house in shape.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t focus on work until I get my house in shape.”
  • A friend might advise, “Take some time to get your house in shape before making any big decisions.”

29. Get one’s thoughts together

This phrase means to take the time to collect one’s thoughts and organize them in a coherent manner. It implies the need for clarity and focus.

  • For instance, “Before giving a presentation, I need to get my thoughts together.”
  • A student might say, “I can’t write my essay until I get my thoughts together.”
  • A person seeking advice might ask, “Can you help me get my thoughts together on this issue?”

30. Set the scene

This phrase means to create or prepare the necessary environment or atmosphere for a particular event, situation, or activity. It implies the need for careful arrangement and attention to detail.

  • For example, “Before hosting a party, I need to set the scene.”
  • A director might say, “We need to set the scene before filming the next scene.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s set the scene with some music and candles for a romantic dinner.”

31. Prep up

This phrase means to get ready or make preparations for something. It is often used to indicate that someone is getting mentally and physically prepared for a specific task or event.

  • For example, before a big game, a coach might say, “It’s time to prep up and show them what we’re made of.”
  • A student might say, “I need to prep up for my final exams and study all night.”
  • Someone getting ready for a job interview might tell themselves, “I need to prep up and practice my answers beforehand.”

32. Psych up

This slang phrase means to mentally prepare oneself for a challenging or exciting situation. It often involves getting oneself into a positive and motivated mindset.

  • For instance, before a performance, a musician might say, “I need to psych up and get in the zone.”
  • A person about to give a presentation might say, “I’m going to psych up and visualize myself delivering a confident speech.”
  • Before a difficult task, someone might say, “I need to psych up and remind myself that I can do this.”

33. Set up for success

This phrase means to make necessary preparations or arrangements in order to increase the chances of achieving a successful outcome in a particular endeavor.

  • For example, a coach might say to their team, “Let’s set up for success by practicing our strategies and working on our skills.”
  • A business owner might say, “I’m going to set up for success by creating a detailed business plan and setting achievable goals.”
  • Before a job interview, someone might say, “I want to set up for success by researching the company and preparing thoughtful questions.”

34. Get one’s game face ready

This slang phrase means to mentally prepare oneself to compete or perform at one’s best. It often involves getting into a focused and determined mindset.

  • For instance, before a sports competition, a coach might say, “It’s time to get your game face ready and show them what you’re made of.”
  • A performer about to go on stage might say, “I need to get my game face ready and give it my all.”
  • Before a challenging task, someone might say, “I’m going to get my game face ready and tackle this head-on.”

35. Get one’s act in motion

This slang phrase means to start taking action or making progress towards a goal or task. It implies that someone needs to stop procrastinating or hesitating and start actively working towards their objective.

  • For example, if someone has been delaying a project, they might say, “It’s time to get my act in motion and start working on it.”
  • A person wanting to improve their fitness might say, “I need to get my act in motion and start going to the gym regularly.”
  • Before starting a new business venture, someone might say, “I’m going to get my act in motion and start researching potential investors.”

36. Get one’s affairs in shape

This phrase means to get one’s personal or professional matters in order and properly managed.

  • For example, before going on vacation, a person might say, “I need to get my affairs in shape so everything runs smoothly while I’m away.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “It’s important to get your affairs in shape before starting a new project.”
  • A financial advisor might advise a client, “Let’s work together to get your affairs in shape and create a solid financial plan.”

37. Get one’s ducks in order

This expression means to get everything organized and ready for a specific task or event.

  • For instance, before a big presentation, someone might say, “I need to get my ducks in order and have all my materials prepared.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Let’s get our ducks in order and have a game plan before the match.”
  • A person preparing for a move might say, “I need to get my ducks in order and start packing.”

38. Get one’s head in gear

This phrase means to start thinking or acting in a more focused and productive manner.

  • For example, a teacher might say to a distracted student, “Come on, get your head in gear and pay attention.”
  • A manager might tell their employee, “You need to get your head in gear and meet the deadline.”
  • A person trying to study might say, “I need to get my head in gear and concentrate on my work.”

39. Get one’s thoughts in order

This expression means to organize one’s thoughts and ideas in a clear and logical manner.

  • For instance, before giving a presentation, a person might say, “I need some time to get my thoughts in order and outline my main points.”
  • A writer might say, “I can’t start writing until I get my thoughts in order and have a clear plan.”
  • A person trying to make a decision might say, “I need to get my thoughts in order before I can choose.”

40. Set the stage for

This phrase means to create the necessary conditions or circumstances for something to happen or be successful.

  • For example, a host might say, “Let’s set the stage for a memorable party by decorating the venue.”
  • A manager might say, “We need to set the stage for a successful product launch by creating a strong marketing campaign.”
  • A person planning a surprise might say, “I’m going to set the stage for a special moment by creating a romantic atmosphere.”

41. Prep oneself up

This phrase means to prepare oneself for a specific activity or event. It often involves getting oneself mentally and physically ready.

  • For example, before a big presentation, someone might say, “I need to prep myself up and review my notes.”
  • When getting ready for a job interview, a person might say, “I’m going to prep myself up by researching the company.”
  • If someone is about to go on a date, they might say, “I need to prep myself up and pick out a nice outfit.”

42. Psych oneself up for

This phrase means to mentally prepare oneself for a challenging or exciting situation. It involves getting oneself in the right mindset and building confidence.

  • For instance, before a sports competition, an athlete might say, “I need to psych myself up and visualize success.”
  • When preparing for a difficult conversation, someone might say, “I’m going to psych myself up and practice what I want to say.”
  • If someone is about to give a presentation, they might say, “I need to psych myself up and focus on delivering a great talk.”

43. Set oneself up for

This phrase means to prepare oneself for a particular outcome or result. It involves taking the necessary steps or actions to increase the chances of success.

  • For example, before starting a new business, an entrepreneur might say, “I need to set myself up for success by creating a solid business plan.”
  • When preparing for a job interview, someone might say, “I’m going to set myself up for a good impression by researching the company and practicing my answers.”
  • If someone is planning to ask for a promotion, they might say, “I need to set myself up for success by showcasing my achievements and skills.”

44. Get one’s game face set

This phrase means to mentally prepare oneself for a competitive or challenging situation. It involves getting into a focused and determined mindset.

  • For instance, before a sports match, an athlete might say, “I need to get my game face set and stay focused.”
  • When preparing for a difficult task, someone might say, “I’m going to get my game face set and tackle it with determination.”
  • If someone is about to negotiate a deal, they might say, “I need to get my game face set and be prepared for any counterarguments.”

45. Get one’s act in order

This phrase means to get oneself organized and prepared for a task or situation. It involves getting everything in order and ready to go.

  • For example, before starting a new project, someone might say, “I need to get my act in order and create a timeline.”
  • When preparing for a trip, a person might say, “I’m going to get my act in order by making a packing list and booking accommodations.”
  • If someone is about to host a party, they might say, “I need to get my act in order and prepare the food, decorations, and entertainment.”

46. Get ready

This phrase means to make oneself ready or prepared for a specific task or event. It implies taking the necessary actions or steps to be prepared.

  • For example, “Get ready for the big game tomorrow!”
  • A parent might say, “Get ready for school, it’s time to leave.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “Get ready to give it your all on the field.”

47. Get prepped

Similar to “get ready,” this phrase means to prepare oneself for a particular situation or activity. It conveys the idea of getting ready in advance and being fully prepared.

  • For instance, “Get prepped for the presentation tomorrow.”
  • A student might say, “I need to get prepped for the exam next week.”
  • A chef might tell their sous chef, “Get prepped for the dinner rush.”

48. Get in gear

This phrase means to prepare oneself mentally and physically to start or engage in a task or activity. It suggests getting into the right mindset and being ready to take action.

  • For example, “Get in gear for the upcoming project.”
  • A coach might motivate their team, saying, “It’s time to get in gear and give it your all.”
  • A manager might tell their employees, “Let’s get in gear and finish this project on time.”

49. Get organized

This phrase means to take the necessary steps to become prepared and organized for a specific task or event. It implies arranging things in a systematic manner and being well-prepared.

  • For instance, “Get organized for the upcoming trip.”
  • A student might say, “I need to get organized for the new semester.”
  • A professional might advise, “To succeed in your job, it’s important to get organized.”

50. Get things in order

This phrase means to arrange or organize things in a proper or orderly manner. It suggests putting things in the right order or sequence to be prepared and ready.

  • For example, “Get things in order before the meeting.”
  • A homeowner might say, “I need to get things in order before the guests arrive.”
  • A project manager might instruct their team, “Let’s get things in order and start working on the tasks.”

51. Get one’s skates on

This phrase means to move quickly or speed up in order to get something done. It is often used to convey a sense of urgency or to encourage someone to act quickly.

  • For example, if someone is running late for a meeting, you might say, “You better get your skates on if you want to make it on time.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might shout, “Get your skates on and hustle!”
  • Someone might use this phrase to motivate themselves, saying, “I need to get my skates on and finish this project before the deadline.”

52. Get your ducks in a row

This expression means to get all the necessary things or details in order before starting or doing something. It implies the need for preparation and careful planning.

  • For instance, if someone is about to start a new business venture, you might advise them, “Make sure you get your ducks in a row before launching.”
  • In a discussion about event planning, someone might say, “It’s important to get your ducks in a row to ensure a smooth execution.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Before starting the exam, make sure you have all your ducks in a row.”

53. Prime up

This phrase means to prepare oneself or someone else for a particular task or event. It implies the need to be mentally and physically prepared.

  • For example, if someone is about to give a presentation, you might say, “It’s time to prime up and show them what you’ve got.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might instruct the team, “Prime up and focus on the game plan.”
  • A person getting ready for a job interview might say, “I need to prime up and review my talking points.”

54. Bone up

This slang phrase means to study or learn something intensively, often in preparation for an exam, test, or important event.

  • For instance, if someone is preparing for a language proficiency test, you might say, “You better bone up on your vocabulary and grammar.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging subject, someone might suggest, “I need to bone up on this topic before the exam.”
  • A student might say, “I’ve been boning up all night for tomorrow’s test.”

55. Square away

This phrase means to organize or arrange things in a neat and orderly manner, especially in preparation for a specific task.

  • For example, if someone is about to start a construction project, you might say, “Let’s square away the materials and tools before we begin.”
  • In a military context, a commander might instruct their troops, “Square away your gear and be ready for deployment.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “We need to square away the project plan before the deadline.”

56. Warm up

This slang phrase is commonly used in sports or exercise to describe the act of getting ready for a game, workout, or performance.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Make sure you warm up before you start running.”
  • A fitness instructor might lead a warm-up routine by saying, “Let’s start with some light stretching to warm up our muscles.”
  • In a dance class, the instructor might say, “We’re going to do a quick warm-up before we start learning the choreography.”

57. Get your head in the game

This slang phrase is often used to encourage someone to concentrate and be mentally present in a situation.

  • For instance, a coach might say to a distracted player, “Come on, get your head in the game!”
  • A teacher might say to a daydreaming student, “You need to get your head in the game if you want to pass this test.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might say to an employee, “We have an important meeting coming up, so make sure you get your head in the game.”

58. Get your house in order

This slang phrase is often used to suggest that someone needs to take care of their own matters or responsibilities before focusing on something else.

  • For example, a parent might tell their child, “Before you go out with your friends, get your house in order and clean your room.”
  • A financial advisor might suggest to a client, “You should get your house in order by creating a budget and paying off any outstanding debts.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say to an employee, “We have an important project deadline approaching, so make sure you get your house in order and prioritize your tasks.”

59. Get your affairs in order

This slang phrase is similar to “get your house in order,” but it specifically refers to getting one’s personal or financial affairs in order.

  • For instance, someone might say to a friend, “You should get your affairs in order before you go on vacation, just in case.”
  • A lawyer might advise a client, “If you’re planning for the future, it’s important to get your affairs in order by creating a will and designating beneficiaries.”
  • In a serious conversation, a person might say, “I’ve been diagnosed with a terminal illness, so I need to get my affairs in order and make arrangements.”

60. Get in the right frame of mind

This slang phrase suggests the need to be mentally prepared or in the right state of mind for a particular activity or situation.

  • For example, a performer might say, “I need to get in the right frame of mind before going on stage.”
  • A student might say, “I have a big exam tomorrow, so I need to get in the right frame of mind to study.”
  • In a motivational context, someone might say, “If you want to succeed, you need to get in the right frame of mind and believe in yourself.”

61. Get your stuff together

This phrase means to gather and arrange all the things or information you need in order to be prepared for a task or situation.

  • For example, if someone is about to go on a trip, you might say, “You better get your stuff together before we leave.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might tell their team, “We have a big presentation tomorrow, so let’s all get our stuff together and be ready.”
  • If someone is struggling to stay organized, a friend might advise, “You need to get your stuff together if you want to succeed.”

62. Get primed

This phrase means to prepare yourself mentally or physically for an upcoming event or activity.

  • For instance, if someone is about to give a speech, you might say, “Take a few deep breaths to get primed before you go on stage.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might tell their team, “We need to get primed for the big game tomorrow. Focus on your training.”
  • If someone is feeling sluggish, a friend might suggest, “Drink a cup of coffee to get yourself primed for the day.”

63. Get ready to roll

This phrase means to get prepared and be ready to begin a task or activity.

  • For example, if a group of friends is about to leave for a road trip, someone might say, “Everyone, get ready to roll. We’re leaving in 10 minutes.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might announce, “The meeting starts in 5 minutes. Get ready to roll.”
  • If someone is hesitant to start a new project, a colleague might encourage them, “Come on, get ready to roll. We can do this together.”

64. Get set up

This phrase means to get everything in order and properly arranged for a specific purpose or activity.

  • For instance, if someone is hosting a party, they might say, “I need to get set up before the guests arrive.”
  • In a technology context, a person might say, “I’m going to get set up with a new computer so I can start working.”
  • If someone is moving into a new apartment, a friend might offer to help them, saying, “Let’s get you set up and settled in.”

65. Get your act in gear

This phrase means to get yourself organized and motivated to begin a task or activity.

  • For example, if someone is procrastinating on a project, you might say, “Come on, get your act in gear and start working.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might tell their team, “We need to get our act in gear if we want to win this game.”
  • If someone is struggling to make progress, a mentor might say, “You need to get your act in gear and take control of your situation.”

66. Get your act in order

This phrase means to get everything in order and be prepared for a task or situation.

  • For example, if someone is about to give a presentation, they might be told, “Get your act in order before you go on stage.”
  • In a work setting, a boss might say to an employee, “You need to get your act in order if you want to meet the deadline.”
  • A friend might advise another friend, “If you want to succeed in your job interview, you need to get your act in order and do some research beforehand.”
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