Top 66 Slang For Profuse – Meaning & Usage

Are you ready to level up your slang game and impress your friends with some fresh vocabulary? Look no further, as we’ve got you covered with the top slang for “profuse” that will take your language skills to the next level. From casual conversations to social media posts, these trendy words will have you speaking like a pro in no time. Stay ahead of the curve and dive into our list to elevate your linguistic repertoire!

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1. Overflowing

When something is overflowing, it means there is an excessive amount of it. It is often used to describe a situation or object that is filled beyond capacity.

  • For example, “The party was overflowing with guests.”
  • A person might say, “I have so much work, my inbox is overflowing.”
  • In a review of a restaurant, someone might write, “The flavors were overflowing in every dish.”

2. Bursting at the seams

When something is bursting at the seams, it means it is filled to its maximum capacity and is about to burst or break open. It is often used to describe a place or situation that is extremely crowded or filled with a large number of things.

  • For instance, “The concert was bursting at the seams with enthusiastic fans.”
  • A person might say, “My schedule is so full, it’s bursting at the seams.”
  • In a review of a popular tourist attraction, someone might write, “The place was bursting at the seams with tourists.”

3. Gushing

When something is gushing, it means it is flowing or pouring out in large quantities. It is often used to describe liquids or emotions that are being expressed in an intense or overwhelming manner.

  • For example, “The water was gushing out of the broken pipe.”
  • A person might say, “She couldn’t stop gushing about her new job.”
  • In a review of a play, someone might write, “The actors’ performances were so powerful, it felt like emotions were gushing from the stage.”

4. Flooded

When something is flooded, it means it is completely filled or overwhelmed with an excessive amount of something. It is often used to describe a place or situation that is overcrowded or inundated.

  • For instance, “The streets were flooded with people during the parade.”
  • A person might say, “My inbox is flooded with unread emails.”
  • In a review of a popular restaurant, someone might write, “The place was flooded with customers, but the staff handled it well.”

5. Pouring

When something is pouring, it means it is raining heavily or falling in a continuous and abundant manner. It is often used to describe rain or other liquids that are flowing or falling in a steady and abundant manner.

  • For example, “It’s pouring outside, so don’t forget your umbrella.”
  • A person might say, “I poured myself a cup of coffee.”
  • In a review of a coffee shop, someone might write, “The barista poured the latte art with precision and skill.”

6. Spilling over

This phrase is used to describe something that is exceeding its boundaries or capacity, often in a figurative sense. It implies an abundance or excess of something.

  • For example, “The emotions were spilling over, and he couldn’t hold back his tears.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business, someone might say, “Their profits are spilling over, and they’re expanding rapidly.”
  • A person describing a crowded event might say, “The venue was so packed, people were spilling over into the streets.”

7. Brimming

This term is used to describe something that is completely filled or overflowing with a particular substance or quality. It implies a sense of fullness or abundance.

  • For instance, “Her eyes were brimming with tears as she listened to the heartfelt speech.”
  • A person describing a joyful celebration might say, “The room was brimming with laughter and happiness.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m brimming with excitement for the upcoming trip.”

8. Teeming

This word is used to describe a place or situation that is full or overflowing with a large number of people, animals, or things. It conveys a sense of abundance and activity.

  • For example, “The streets were teeming with shoppers during the holiday season.”
  • In a discussion about a busy restaurant, someone might say, “The place was teeming with customers, and there was a long wait.”
  • A person describing a lively city might say, “The city is teeming with culture and diversity.”

9. Prolific

This term is used to describe someone or something that produces a large amount of work, ideas, or offspring. It implies a consistent and impressive level of output.

  • For instance, “He is a prolific writer, publishing multiple books every year.”
  • In a discussion about a successful artist, someone might say, “She is known for her prolific body of work.”
  • A person describing a productive garden might say, “The plants in this garden are incredibly prolific, producing an abundance of fruits and vegetables.”

10. Copious

This word is used to describe something that is present in large quantities or amounts. It suggests a generous or plentiful supply of something.

  • For example, “She took copious notes during the lecture to ensure she didn’t miss any important information.”
  • In a discussion about a lavish feast, someone might say, “The table was filled with copious amounts of delicious food.”
  • A person describing a heavy rainfall might say, “The storm brought copious amounts of rain, causing flooding in some areas.”

11. Abounding

This word describes something that is plentiful or overflowing in quantity or amount.

  • For example, “The garden was abounding with colorful flowers.”
  • A person might say, “The city is abounding with opportunities for young professionals.”
  • In a discussion about wildlife, someone might mention, “The national park is abounding with diverse animal species.”

12. Excessive

This term refers to something that is more than what is considered normal or necessary.

  • For instance, “His spending habits are excessive; he always buys the latest gadgets.”
  • A person might say, “The party decorations were excessive; there were balloons and streamers everywhere.”
  • In a conversation about work, someone might complain, “The workload is excessive; I can’t keep up with all the tasks.”

13. Lavish

This word describes something that is characterized by luxury, extravagance, or abundance.

  • For example, “They had a lavish wedding with a five-course meal and live entertainment.”
  • A person might say, “The hotel room was lavish, with a king-sized bed and a jacuzzi.”
  • In a discussion about vacations, someone might mention, “They went on a lavish trip to a private island.”

14. Superabundant

This term describes something that is in excess or more than enough.

  • For instance, “The garden had a superabundant harvest of tomatoes.”
  • A person might say, “The store had a superabundant supply of the latest fashion trends.”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might mention, “The buffet had a superabundant selection of dishes.”

15. Bountiful

This word describes something that is plentiful, abundant, or generous in quantity or amount.

  • For example, “The harvest was bountiful, with an abundance of fruits and vegetables.”
  • A person might say, “The company had a bountiful year, with record-breaking profits.”
  • In a discussion about nature, someone might mention, “The forest is bountiful, with a variety of wildlife species.”

16. Plentiful

This word is used to describe something that is in large quantities or is abundant.

  • For example, “The garden is filled with plentiful flowers.”
  • A person might say, “We had a plentiful harvest this year.”
  • Another might exclaim, “There’s a plentiful selection of food at the buffet.”

17. Luxuriant

This term is used to describe something that is rich, abundant, or growing in a thick or lavish manner.

  • For instance, “The forest is filled with luxuriant greenery.”
  • A person might say, “Her hair is luxuriant and shiny.”
  • Another might comment, “The garden is full of luxuriant blooms.”

18. Profusive

This word is used to describe something that is overflowing or abundant in a grand or excessive way.

  • For example, “The river is profusive after heavy rain.”
  • A person might say, “Her profusive laughter filled the room.”
  • Another might comment, “The profusive decorations made the party feel extravagant.”

19. Overflow

This term is used to describe something that is overflowing or exceeding its normal or expected limits.

  • For instance, “The sink is overflowing with water.”
  • A person might say, “His emotions overflowed and he couldn’t hold back his tears.”
  • Another might comment, “The crowd overflowed the stadium during the championship game.”

20. Bursting

This word is used to describe something that is filled to the point of bursting or overflowing.

  • For example, “The balloon is bursting with air.”
  • A person might say, “The box is bursting with gifts.”
  • Another might comment, “The city is bursting with energy during the festival.”

21. Rife

This term is used to describe something that is abundant or widespread. It implies that something is present in great quantities or is prevalent.

  • For example, “The city is rife with opportunities for young professionals.”
  • In a discussion about a particular issue, someone might say, “Corruption is rife in the government.”
  • A person might comment on a crowded shopping mall, “The mall is rife with shoppers during the holiday season.”

22. Rich

When something is described as “rich,” it means that it is abundant, plentiful, or overflowing in quantity or quality. It often refers to something that is luxurious or indulgent.

  • For instance, “The cake was rich in flavor and texture.”
  • In a conversation about a successful business, someone might say, “They have a rich customer base.”
  • A person might describe a painting as “rich in color and detail.”
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23. Abundant

This term is used to describe something that is plentiful, ample, or in large quantities. It suggests that there is more than enough of something.

  • For example, “The garden is abundant with flowers.”
  • In a discussion about wildlife, someone might say, “This region is abundant in bird species.”
  • A person might comment on a buffet, “The food options are abundant and diverse.”

24. Profusion

This word refers to an excessive or large amount of something. It implies that there is an abundance or overflow of a particular thing.

  • For instance, “The profusion of colors in the sunset was breathtaking.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “The artist used a profusion of brushstrokes to create texture.”
  • A person might comment on a display of flowers, “The garden is a profusion of blooms.”

25. Generous

When something is described as generous, it means that it is ample, bountiful, or abundant. It suggests that there is more than enough of something, often in a positive or beneficial way.

  • For example, “The host was generous with food and drinks.”
  • In a conversation about a charitable organization, someone might say, “They provide generous support to those in need.”
  • A person might describe a person’s heart as “generous and kind.”

26. Swarming

When something is “swarming,” it means it is overflowing or abundant in a chaotic or overwhelming way. This term is often used to describe a large number of people or things gathered in a particular place.

  • For example, “The concert was swarming with fans eager to see their favorite band.”
  • A person might say, “The city streets were swarming with tourists during the summer.”
  • In a crowded party, someone might comment, “The dance floor is swarming with people.”

27. Riotous

When something is described as “riotous,” it means it is wildly excessive or overflowing with energy or emotion. This term is often used to describe a situation or behavior that is out of control.

  • For instance, “The party was riotous with laughter and dancing.”
  • A person might say, “The children’s playdate turned riotous with excitement.”
  • In a rowdy sports game, someone might comment, “The crowd was riotous with cheers and chants.”

28. Extravagant

When something is described as “extravagant,” it means it is lavish, excessive, or over-the-top. This term is often used to describe something that is luxurious or indulgent.

  • For example, “The hotel room was extravagant, with a stunning view and a Jacuzzi.”
  • A person might say, “She threw an extravagant birthday party with live music and a gourmet buffet.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might comment, “Her outfit was absolutely extravagant, with sequins and feathers.”

29. Inundated

When something is “inundated,” it means it is flooded or overwhelmed with a large amount of something. This term is often used to describe a situation or a person who is overwhelmed or swamped.

  • For instance, “After the announcement, the company was inundated with job applications.”
  • A person might say, “I feel inundated with work and responsibilities.”
  • In a busy restaurant, someone might comment, “The staff is inundated with orders during the lunch rush.”

30. Surging

When something is described as “surging,” it means it is rapidly increasing or rising in a powerful or forceful way. This term is often used to describe a strong and sudden increase in something.

  • For example, “The stock market is surging with record-breaking gains.”
  • A person might say, “The team’s surging popularity led to sold-out stadiums.”
  • In a discussion about a wave of protests, someone might comment, “The movement is surging across the country.”

31. Bursting forth

This phrase is used to describe something that is overflowing or coming out in a strong and abundant manner.

  • For example, “The laughter was bursting forth from the room.”
  • A person might say, “The emotions were bursting forth uncontrollably.”
  • In a description of a waterfall, one might say, “The water was bursting forth from the rocks.”

32. Spilling out

This phrase is used to describe something that is pouring out or overflowing in a profuse manner.

  • For instance, “The words were spilling out of her mouth.”
  • A person might say, “The tears were spilling out uncontrollably.”
  • In a description of a crowded room, one might say, “People were spilling out of the doorway.”

33. Bursting with

This phrase is used to describe something that is full of or filled with a large amount of something.

  • For example, “The room was bursting with laughter.”
  • A person might say, “The garden was bursting with colorful flowers.”
  • In a description of a buffet, one might say, “The table was bursting with delicious food.”

34. Bubbling over

This phrase is used to describe something that is overflowing or filled to the point of overflowing with a certain quality or emotion.

  • For instance, “She was bubbling over with excitement.”
  • A person might say, “His speech was bubbling over with enthusiasm.”
  • In a description of a joyful gathering, one might say, “The room was bubbling over with happiness.”

35. Streaming

This word is used to describe something that is flowing or coming out in a continuous and abundant manner.

  • For example, “Tears were streaming down her face.”
  • A person might say, “Water was streaming out of the faucet.”
  • In a description of a concert, one might say, “Music was streaming from the speakers.”

36. Cascading

This term describes something that is flowing or falling in large quantities. It is often used to describe waterfalls or a large amount of liquid pouring down.

  • For example, “The water was cascading down the rocks, creating a beautiful sight.”
  • In a discussion about heavy rain, someone might say, “The rain was cascading from the sky, soaking everything.”
  • A person might describe a overflowing fountain as “cascading water”.
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37. Pouring out

This phrase is used to describe something that is coming out or flowing in a profuse manner. It can be used to describe liquids, emotions, or any other substance or concept.

  • For instance, “Tears were pouring out of her eyes as she watched the sad movie.”
  • In a conversation about a water leak, someone might say, “Water was pouring out of the pipe, causing a flood.”
  • A person might describe their feelings during a breakup as “emotions pouring out”.

38. Abloom

This term refers to something that is in full bloom, usually used to describe flowers or plants. It signifies a state of abundance and beauty.

  • For example, “The garden was abloom with colorful flowers.”
  • In a discussion about spring, someone might say, “The cherry blossoms are abloom, creating a stunning view.”
  • A person might describe a field of wildflowers as “nature abloom”.

39. Bursting out

This phrase is used to describe something that is bursting or exploding with a particular quality or substance. It signifies a sudden and abundant release.

  • For instance, “The piñata burst out with candy when it was hit.”
  • In a conversation about laughter, someone might say, “He couldn’t control himself and burst out laughing.”
  • A person might describe a burst of creativity as “ideas bursting out”.

40. Raining down

This phrase is used to describe something that is falling or descending in a profuse manner, similar to rain. It can be used to describe objects, events, or any other concept.

  • For example, “Confetti was raining down on the parade participants.”
  • In a discussion about praise, someone might say, “Compliments were raining down on the talented singer.”
  • A person might describe a heavy snowfall as “snowflakes raining down”.

41. Spewing out

This phrase refers to something forcefully and uncontrollably coming out or being expelled. It is often used to describe a large amount of something being released.

  • For example, “The volcano was spewing out lava and ash.”
  • A person might say, “The broken pipe in the basement is spewing out water.”
  • In a figurative sense, someone might say, “She was spewing out insults during the argument.”

42. Brimming over

This phrase means to be filled or filled to the point of overflowing. It is often used to describe a situation where there is an excessive amount of something.

  • For instance, “The cup was brimming over with hot coffee.”
  • A person might say, “Her heart was brimming over with joy.”
  • In a figurative sense, someone might say, “The room was brimming over with excitement.”

43. Gushing forth

This phrase describes something flowing out rapidly and forcefully. It is often used to describe a sudden and intense release of something.

  • For example, “The water was gushing forth from the broken pipe.”
  • A person might say, “She couldn’t contain her emotions and they started gushing forth.”
  • In a figurative sense, someone might say, “Ideas were gushing forth from his creative mind.”

44. Spouting out

This phrase means to release or discharge something, often in a forceful or sudden manner. It is often used to describe the act of expelling a substance or information.

  • For instance, “The whale was spouting out water from its blowhole.”
  • A person might say, “He couldn’t stop spouting out random facts.”
  • In a figurative sense, someone might say, “She was spouting out nonsense during the meeting.”

45. Spurting out

This phrase refers to something being forcefully ejected or expelled in a sudden and short burst. It is often used to describe the action of a liquid or substance being forcefully expelled.

  • For example, “The bottle was spurting out water when it was squeezed.”
  • A person might say, “He accidentally cut his finger and blood started spurting out.”
  • In a figurative sense, someone might say, “She was spurting out ideas during the brainstorming session.”

46. Overflowing with

This phrase is used to describe something that is filled or brimming with a particular thing or quality.

  • For example, “The garden was overflowing with vibrant flowers.”
  • A person might say, “Her speech was overflowing with emotion and passion.”
  • In a review of a restaurant, one might write, “The buffet was overflowing with delicious options.”

47. Spewing forth

This slang phrase is used to describe something that is forcefully or uncontrollably coming out or being emitted.

  • For instance, “The volcano was spewing forth lava and ash.”
  • A person might say, “His anger was spewing forth in a series of insults.”
  • In a description of a fountain, one might write, “Water was spewing forth from the top in a beautiful display.”

48. Exuberant

This word is used to describe someone or something that is lively, energetic, and filled with excitement.

  • For example, “The crowd at the concert was exuberant, dancing and singing along.”
  • A person might say, “She had an exuberant personality that lit up the room.”
  • In a review of a performance, one might write, “The actors delivered an exuberant and captivating show.”

49. Superfluous

This term is used to describe something that is more than what is needed or required, often considered excessive or unnecessary.

  • For instance, “The decorations in the room were superfluous, overpowering the simplicity of the design.”
  • A person might say, “Using too many adjectives can make your writing sound superfluous.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, one might argue, “Cutting out superfluous expenses can help save money.”

50. Overabundant

This word is used to describe something that is present in large quantities or is overly plentiful.

  • For example, “The garden had an overabundant harvest of tomatoes.”
  • A person might say, “The store had an overabundant selection of clothing options.”
  • In a description of a buffet, one might write, “The buffet offered an overabundant array of dishes to choose from.”

51. Lush

When something is described as “lush,” it means that it is abundant or plentiful. This slang term is often used to describe a large quantity or a lot of something.

  • For example, “The garden is lush with colorful flowers.”
  • A person might say, “The party was a hit. The food and drinks were lush.”
  • In a conversation about a successful business, someone might comment, “Their profits are lush this year.”

52. Packed

When something is “packed,” it means that it is filled to capacity or completely full. This slang term is often used to describe a place or an event that is crowded or busy.

  • For instance, “The concert was packed with enthusiastic fans.”
  • A person might say, “I went to the mall, but it was so packed that I couldn’t find a parking spot.”
  • In a discussion about a popular restaurant, someone might comment, “The place is always packed, so make a reservation in advance.”

53. Stuffed

When something is “stuffed,” it means that it is filled to the brim or completely full. This slang term is often used to describe a person or an object that is packed with a lot of something.

  • For example, “I ate so much at Thanksgiving dinner that I felt stuffed.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t fit any more clothes in my suitcase. It’s stuffed.”
  • In a conversation about a toy collection, someone might comment, “His room is filled with stuffed animals. It’s like a zoo in there.”

54. Loaded

When something is described as “loaded,” it means that it is abundantly supplied or well-stocked. This slang term is often used to describe a person or a place that has a lot of something.

  • For instance, “She always carries a loaded wallet with cash.”
  • A person might say, “The bar is loaded with a wide variety of drinks.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business, someone might comment, “Their warehouse is loaded with inventory.”

55. Jam-packed

When something is “jam-packed,” it means that it is extremely crowded or filled to capacity. This slang term is often used to describe a place or an event that is packed with people or things.

  • For example, “The subway during rush hour is always jam-packed.”
  • A person might say, “The shopping mall was jam-packed with holiday shoppers.”
  • In a conversation about a popular concert, someone might comment, “The stadium was jam-packed with fans singing along to every song.”

56. Saturated

To be completely soaked or saturated with something. This term is often used to describe being overwhelmed or inundated with something.

  • For example, “After the heavy rainstorm, the ground was saturated with water.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling saturated with work right now, I need a break.”
  • In a discussion about social media, someone might comment, “My feed is saturated with ads, it’s so annoying.”

57. Slew

This slang term is used to describe a large quantity or number of something. It is often used to emphasize the abundance or profusion of something.

  • For instance, “He has a slew of books in his collection.”
  • A person might say, “There’s a slew of options to choose from at this restaurant.”
  • In a conversation about assignments, someone might mention, “I have a slew of tasks to complete by the end of the day.”

58. Plenteous

This term is used to describe something that is abundant or plentiful. It signifies a large amount or quantity of something.

  • For example, “The garden is filled with plenteous fruits and vegetables.”
  • A person might say, “The buffet offers a plenteous selection of dishes.”
  • In a discussion about resources, someone might mention, “We have a plenteous supply of water in this area.”

59. Flush

To be flush means to be in a state of abundance or plenty. It is often used to describe having a large amount of something.

  • For instance, “After the successful launch, the company was flush with cash.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling flush with ideas for my new project.”
  • In a conversation about resources, someone might comment, “We’re flush with supplies, no need to worry.”

60. Brimful

To be brimful means to be filled to the brim or overflowing with something. It refers to a state of being completely full or abundant.

  • For example, “The glass was brimful with water.”
  • A person might say, “I’m brimful of excitement for the upcoming concert.”
  • In a discussion about a party, someone might mention, “The venue was brimful with guests, it was a great turnout.”

61. Overfull

This term is used to describe something that is filled or packed to capacity, often to the point of overflowing.

  • For example, “The sink was overfull with dirty dishes.”
  • A person might say, “I ate so much at the buffet that I feel overfull.”
  • Someone might complain, “The subway car was overfull during rush hour.”

62. Overloaded

When something is overloaded, it means that it is carrying or containing too much of something, exceeding its capacity or capability.

  • For instance, “The truck was overloaded with heavy cargo.”
  • A person might say, “My brain feels overloaded with information.”
  • Someone might complain, “My schedule is overloaded with appointments and meetings.”

63. Stuffed to the gills

This phrase is used to describe something that is completely filled or packed to its maximum capacity, often to the point of being uncomfortable.

  • For example, “The restaurant was stuffed to the gills with customers.”
  • A person might say, “I ate so much at Thanksgiving dinner that I was stuffed to the gills.”
  • Someone might complain, “The bus was stuffed to the gills and there was no room to move.”

64. Jammed

When something is jammed, it means that it is tightly packed or crowded, often to the point where movement or operation is difficult.

  • For instance, “The subway train was jammed with commuters.”
  • A person might say, “The concert venue was jammed with fans.”
  • Someone might complain, “The printer is jammed and I can’t print my documents.”

65. Crammed

This term is used to describe something that is tightly packed or squeezed into a small space, often to the point of discomfort or difficulty.

  • For example, “The students were crammed into a small classroom.”
  • A person might say, “I crammed all my belongings into a single suitcase.”
  • Someone might complain, “The elevator was crammed with people and it was difficult to breathe.”

66. Stacked

This term is used to describe someone, usually a woman, who has large breasts. It refers to the idea that her breasts are “stacked” or piled on top of each other.

  • For instance, a guy might say to his friend, “Did you see that girl? She’s definitely stacked!”
  • In a conversation about physical attributes, someone might comment, “She’s got a great figure – tall, slim, and stacked.”
  • A person might describe a celebrity as, “She’s known for her stacked physique.”