Top 55 Slang For Make Change – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language is constantly evolving, staying up-to-date with the latest slang is crucial for effective communication. “Make Change” is no exception, with new phrases and expressions popping up all the time. Lucky for you, our team has done the legwork to compile a list of the most trendy and impactful slang terms for making change. Get ready to level up your linguistic game and make a difference in style!

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1. Break a bill

This phrase is commonly used when someone wants to exchange a large bill, such as a $20 or $50, for smaller bills or coins. It is often used in situations where a person needs smaller denominations of currency for various reasons.

  • For example, if someone needs change for a $100 bill, they might ask, “Can you break a bill for me?”
  • When paying for a small purchase with a large bill, a person might say, “I need to break a bill for this.”
  • In a retail store, a cashier might ask a customer, “Do you need me to break a bill for you?”

2. Split a bill

This phrase is commonly used when a group of people wants to divide the cost of a bill equally among themselves. It is often used in social settings, such as restaurants or bars, where multiple individuals are sharing the expenses.

  • For instance, if a group of friends dines together and wants to divide the bill equally, they might say, “Let’s split the bill.”
  • When calculating individual shares, someone might suggest, “We can split the bill three ways.”
  • In a situation where one person pays the entire bill first, they might ask others, “Can you Venmo me your share? We’ll split the bill later.”

3. Cash out

This phrase is often used when someone wants to withdraw money from a digital or electronic account and receive physical currency, such as cash or coins. It can also refer to the act of selling or liquidating assets to obtain cash.

  • For example, if someone wants to withdraw money from their online banking account, they might say, “I need to cash out.”
  • When selling cryptocurrency and receiving cash in return, a person might mention, “I’m planning to cash out my Bitcoin.”
  • In a discussion about financial planning, someone might advise, “It’s important to have a plan for when you want to cash out your investments.”

4. Break down

This phrase can have multiple meanings depending on the context. It can refer to exchanging a large bill for smaller denominations or converting electronic funds into smaller denominations or coins. It is often used when someone needs smaller units of currency for various purposes.

  • For instance, if someone wants to exchange a $50 bill for five $10 bills, they might say, “Can you break down the bill for me?”
  • When converting a digital payment into physical coins for vending machines, someone might ask, “Can you break down the payment?”
  • In a retail store, a cashier might inquire, “Do you want me to break down your change into smaller denominations?”

5. Make change

This phrase is commonly used when a person needs smaller denominations of currency in exchange for a larger bill. It can also refer to giving someone the correct amount of change after a purchase or transaction.

  • For example, if someone hands a cashier a $20 bill and needs $10 in change, they might say, “Can you make change for me?”
  • When a customer hands a large bill to a cashier for a small purchase, the cashier might ask, “Do you want me to make change for you?”
  • In a situation where someone receives incorrect change, they might request, “Can you make change? I gave you a $10 bill, not a $20 bill.”

6. Split a fifty

This slang phrase refers to breaking a fifty-dollar bill into smaller bills and coins to make change. It is often used when a person needs smaller denominations for various transactions.

  • For example, “I need to split a fifty so I can pay for my coffee.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want me to split a fifty for you?”
  • Someone might say, “I always split a fifty when I go to the vending machine.”

7. Break a hundred

This slang phrase means to exchange a one-hundred-dollar bill for smaller bills and coins. It is commonly used when someone needs change for a large bill.

  • For instance, “Can you break a hundred? I need change for the bus.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want me to break a hundred for you?”
  • Someone might say, “I always break a hundred when I go to the farmer’s market.”

8. Change up

This slang phrase refers to exchanging bills or coins for different denominations. It can be used when someone wants to change the composition of their currency.

  • For example, “I need to change up my bills. I have too many twenties.”
  • A person might say, “I like to change up my coins so I have a variety.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you change up this five-dollar bill for quarters?”

9. Break a ten

This slang phrase means to exchange a ten-dollar bill for smaller bills and coins. It is commonly used when someone needs change for a small bill.

  • For instance, “Can you break a ten? I need change for the parking meter.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want me to break a ten for you?”
  • Someone might say, “I always break a ten when I go to the convenience store.”

10. Make small change

This slang phrase refers to obtaining smaller denominations of currency, such as coins or lower-value bills. It is often used when someone needs change for a specific purpose.

  • For example, “I need to make small change for the vending machine.”
  • A person might say, “I always make small change before going to the laundromat.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you help me make small change for the parking garage?”

11. Split a twenty-five

This phrase is commonly used when a group of people are splitting the cost of something and need change for their larger bill. It refers to dividing a twenty-five dollar bill into smaller denominations, such as five one-dollar bills or a combination of bills and coins.

  • For example, if a group of friends are paying for dinner and one person has a twenty-five dollar bill, they might say, “Can someone split a twenty-five?”
  • When shopping at a market, a customer might ask the cashier, “Can you split a twenty-five?”
  • In a conversation about paying for parking, someone might mention, “I had to split a twenty-five to get enough quarters.”

12. Break a fifty-cent piece

This phrase is used when someone wants to exchange a fifty-cent coin for smaller denominations, such as quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies. It is often used when someone needs smaller change for vending machines, parking meters, or other situations that require specific coin denominations.

  • For instance, if someone has a fifty-cent coin and needs quarters for a vending machine, they might say, “Can you break a fifty-cent piece?”
  • When discussing the need for change at a laundromat, someone might mention, “I always break a fifty-cent piece for the dryer.”
  • In a conversation about a parking meter, someone might ask, “Do you have change? I need to break a fifty-cent piece.”

13. Change down

This phrase is commonly used when someone wants to convert larger bills, such as a twenty-dollar bill, into smaller denominations, such as five-dollar bills or one-dollar bills. It is often used when someone needs smaller bills for convenience or to make change for a transaction.

  • For example, if someone has a twenty-dollar bill and wants to exchange it for five-dollar bills, they might say, “Can you change down?”
  • When discussing the need for smaller bills at a cash register, someone might mention, “I always change down at the bank before my shift.”
  • In a conversation about making change for a customer, a cashier might ask, “Do you want me to change down your twenty?”

14. Break a quarter

This phrase is used when someone wants to exchange a quarter for smaller denominations, such as dimes, nickels, and pennies. It is often used when someone needs smaller change for vending machines, parking meters, or other situations that require specific coin denominations.

  • For instance, if someone has a quarter and needs dimes for a parking meter, they might say, “Can you break a quarter?”
  • When discussing the need for change at a convenience store, someone might mention, “I always break a quarter for the gumball machine.”
  • In a conversation about needing change for a bus fare, someone might ask, “Can you break a quarter for me?”

15. Make change for a dollar

This phrase is commonly used when someone wants to exchange a one-dollar bill for smaller denominations, such as quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies. It is often used when someone needs smaller change for vending machines, parking meters, or other situations that require specific coin denominations.

  • For example, if someone has a one-dollar bill and needs quarters for a vending machine, they might say, “Can you make change for a dollar?”
  • When discussing the need for change at a carnival, someone might mention, “They have a booth where they make change for a dollar.”
  • In a conversation about needing change for a toll booth, someone might ask, “Do you have change? I need to make change for a dollar.”

16. Break change

This phrase is used when someone wants to exchange larger bills or coins for smaller denominations.

  • For example, “Can you break change for a twenty-dollar bill?”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you need me to break change for you?”
  • Someone might say, “I need to break change for the laundry machine.”

17. Get coins

This phrase is used when someone wants to acquire coins, typically in lower denominations.

  • For instance, “Can I get coins for the parking meter?”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I get coins for the vending machine?”
  • Someone might say, “I need to get coins for the bus fare.”

18. Break a fiver

This phrase is used when someone wants to exchange a five-dollar bill for smaller bills or coins.

  • For example, “Can you break a fiver for me? I need smaller bills.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want me to break that fiver for you?”
  • Someone might say, “I need to break a fiver to pay for parking.”

19. Get singles

This phrase is used when someone wants to acquire one-dollar bills.

  • For instance, “I need to get singles for tipping.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I get singles for the vending machine?”
  • Someone might say, “I need to get singles for the cash register.”

20. Split a tenner

This phrase is used when someone wants to divide a ten-dollar bill into smaller bills or coins.

  • For example, “Let’s split a tenner so we can have change for the bus.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you split a tenner with me? I need smaller bills.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to split a tenner to pay for drinks.”

21. Get quarters

This phrase is used to express the action of acquiring a certain amount of quarters, which are 25-cent coins. It is often used when someone needs quarters for laundry machines, parking meters, or arcade games.

  • For example, “I need to get quarters for the vending machine.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where I can get quarters for the laundromat?”
  • Someone might mention, “I always make sure to get quarters before going to the arcade.”

22. Split a twenty

This slang phrase refers to dividing a twenty-dollar bill into smaller denominations, usually to share the cost of something with someone else. It is often used when paying for a meal or splitting expenses.

  • For instance, “Let’s split a twenty for the pizza.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t break this twenty, can we split it?”
  • Someone might suggest, “We can split a twenty and each get ten-dollar bills.”

23. Get dimes

This phrase is used to express the action of obtaining a certain amount of dimes, which are ten-cent coins. It is often used when someone needs dimes for vending machines, payphones, or other coin-operated devices.

  • For example, “I need to get dimes for the parking meter.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where I can get dimes for the payphone?”
  • Someone might mention, “I always make sure to get dimes before using the vending machine.”

24. Break a pound

This slang phrase refers to exchanging a one-pound note (or any large bill) for smaller denominations, such as coins or smaller bills. It is often used when someone needs smaller change for convenience or to make smaller purchases.

  • For instance, “I need to break a pound for the bus fare.”
  • A person might say, “Can you break a pound for me? I need some change.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Let’s break a pound and use the change for snacks.”

25. Get nickels

This phrase is used to express the action of acquiring a certain amount of nickels, which are five-cent coins. It is often used when someone needs nickels for vending machines, parking meters, or other coin-operated devices.

  • For example, “I need to get nickels for the arcade.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where I can get nickels for the jukebox?”
  • Someone might mention, “I always make sure to get nickels before going to the amusement park.”

26. Break a euro

This phrase is commonly used when someone wants to exchange a euro bill for smaller coins or bills.

  • For example, “I need to break a euro to get some change for the vending machine.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want me to break a euro for you?”
  • A traveler might say, “I need to break a euro to have some coins for the bus fare.”

27. Get pennies

This phrase refers to receiving pennies as change during a transaction.

  • For instance, “I bought a candy bar and got pennies as change.”
  • A person might complain, “I hate when I get pennies instead of quarters.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you mind if I give you pennies as change?”

28. Break a note

This phrase is commonly used when someone wants to exchange a larger bill, such as a $20 bill, for smaller bills or coins.

  • For example, “I need to break a note to have smaller bills for tipping.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Would you like me to break a note for you?”
  • A person might say, “I need to break a note to get some change for the parking meter.”

29. Get change in coins

This phrase refers to receiving coins as change during a transaction.

  • For instance, “I paid with a $5 bill and got change in coins.”
  • A person might request, “Can I get change in coins instead of bills?”
  • A cashier might inform, “I can give you change in coins if you prefer.”

30. Break a bill into coins

This phrase is commonly used when someone wants to exchange a larger bill, such as a $10 bill, for coins.

  • For example, “I need to break a bill into coins for the parking meter.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Would you like me to break a bill into coins for you?”
  • A person might say, “I want to break a bill into coins for the arcade machine.”

31. Get small bills

This phrase is used when someone wants to exchange their larger bills for smaller ones.

  • For example, “I need to get small bills for the vending machine.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want to get small bills for that hundred-dollar bill?”
  • A person might say, “I always try to get small bills when I withdraw money from the ATM.”

32. Break a twenty into singles

This phrase is used when someone wants to exchange a twenty-dollar bill for a number of one-dollar bills.

  • For instance, “Can you break a twenty into singles?”
  • A person might say, “I need to break a twenty into singles for the tip.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you know where I can break a twenty into singles?”

33. Get change in bills

This phrase is used when someone wants to receive their change in the form of bills rather than coins.

  • For example, “Can I get change in bills instead of coins?”
  • A customer might ask, “Is it possible to get change in bills for this twenty?”
  • A person might say, “I prefer to get change in bills for convenience.”

34. Split a note

This phrase is used when someone wants to divide a larger bill into smaller denominations.

  • For instance, “Let’s split a note so we have smaller bills.”
  • A person might say, “I can split a note for you if you need smaller bills.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you split a note into fives and tens?”

35. Make change for a twenty

This phrase is used when someone wants to exchange a twenty-dollar bill for smaller denominations.

  • For example, “Can you make change for a twenty?”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you need me to make change for a twenty?”
  • A person might say, “I can make change for a twenty if you need smaller bills.”

36. Split a hundred

This phrase is used when someone wants to break a $100 bill into smaller bills or coins. It refers to the act of dividing the bill to make change.

  • For example, a person might say, “Can you split a hundred? I need some smaller bills.”
  • In a retail setting, a cashier might ask, “Do you want me to split this hundred for you?”
  • A friend might offer, “I can split a hundred with you if you need change.”

37. Split a Fiver

Similar to “split a hundred,” this phrase is used when someone wants to break a $5 bill into smaller bills or coins. It refers to the act of dividing the bill to make change.

  • For instance, a person might ask, “Can you split a fiver? I need some quarters.”
  • In a convenience store, a customer might request, “Can you split this fiver into ones and coins?”
  • A friend might offer, “I can split a fiver with you if you need change.”

38. Change a Hundred

This phrase is used when someone wants to exchange a $100 bill for smaller bills or coins. It implies the act of changing the bill to make it easier to use for transactions.

  • For example, a person might say, “Can you change a hundred? I need some smaller bills.”
  • In a bank, a customer might request, “I’d like to change this hundred into twenties, please.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want me to change this hundred for you?”

39. Swap Coins

This phrase is used when someone wants to trade their coins for bills or different denominations of coins. It suggests the act of swapping or exchanging coins to make change.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to swap these coins for some dollar bills.”
  • In a vending machine, a user might see a sign that says, “Swap your coins for bills at the customer service desk.”
  • A friend might offer, “I can swap coins with you if you need different denominations.”

40. Change a Twenty

Similar to “change a hundred,” this phrase is used when someone wants to exchange a $20 bill for smaller bills or coins. It implies the act of changing the bill to make it easier to use for transactions.

  • For example, a person might ask, “Can you change a twenty? I need some ones and fives.”
  • In a store, a customer might request, “I’d like to change this twenty into tens and fives, please.”
  • A cashier might say, “I can change that twenty for you if you’d like.”

41. Split a Dollar

This phrase is used when someone wants to break a dollar bill into smaller bills or coins for various reasons, such as making change or sharing expenses.

  • For example, “Can you split a dollar? I need some change for the vending machine.”
  • In a group setting, someone might ask, “Does anyone want to split a dollar for the parking meter?”
  • If someone needs change for a bus fare, they might say, “I need to split a dollar into quarters.”

42. Split a Quarter

This phrase is used when someone wants to break a quarter coin into smaller coins, usually dimes or nickels, to make change or have smaller denominations.

  • For instance, “Can you split a quarter? I need some dimes for the laundry.”
  • If someone is short on change for a parking meter, they might ask, “Can you split a quarter into nickels?”
  • In a conversation about coin-operated machines, someone might say, “I always split a quarter into dimes for the vending machine.”

43. Change a Five

This phrase is used when someone wants to exchange a five-dollar bill for smaller bills or coins, typically for the purpose of making change or having smaller denominations.

  • For example, “Can you change a five? I need some singles for the tip.”
  • If someone needs change for a bus fare, they might say, “I need to change a five into quarters and dimes.”
  • In a retail setting, a customer might ask, “Can you change a five into ones?”

44. Break a Dollar

This phrase is used when someone wants to exchange a one-dollar bill for coins or smaller bills, often for the purpose of making change or having smaller denominations.

  • For instance, “Can you break a dollar? I need some quarters for the laundry.”
  • In a conversation about vending machines, someone might say, “I always break a dollar into dimes for the snack machine.”
  • If someone needs change for a parking meter, they might ask, “Can you break a dollar into nickels?”

45. Split a Nickel

This phrase is used when someone wants to break a nickel coin into smaller coins, usually pennies, to make change or have smaller denominations.

  • For example, “Can you split a nickel? I need some pennies for the charity donation.”
  • If someone is short on change for a bus fare, they might ask, “Can you split a nickel into dimes?”
  • In a conversation about coin-operated lockers, someone might say, “I always split a nickel into pennies for the locker rental.”

46. Change a Penny

This phrase refers to breaking a penny (the smallest unit of currency) into smaller denominations, such as nickels, dimes, or quarters. It is often used when someone needs smaller coins for various purposes.

  • For example, “Can you change a penny? I need some quarters for the vending machine.”
  • In a conversation about tips, someone might say, “I always make sure to change a penny into nickels and give them as tips.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want me to change a penny for you so you have more change?”

47. Divide a Twenty

This phrase refers to splitting a twenty dollar bill into smaller denominations, such as ten-dollar bills or five-dollar bills. It is often used when someone needs smaller bills for various purposes.

  • For instance, “Can you divide a twenty? I need two ten-dollar bills.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “I always divide a twenty into two ten-dollar bills and use one for groceries and the other for gas.”
  • A person might ask a friend, “Can you divide a twenty for me? I need some smaller bills for the parking meter.”

48. Get Change for a Fifty

This phrase refers to exchanging a fifty dollar bill for smaller denominations, such as twenty-dollar bills, ten-dollar bills, or five-dollar bills. It is often used when someone needs smaller bills for various purposes.

  • For example, “Can you get change for a fifty? I need some tens and twenties.”
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might say, “I always get change for a fifty before going to the flea market.”
  • A person might ask a bank teller, “Can I get change for a fifty? I need some smaller bills for tipping.”

49. Divide a Fifty

This phrase refers to splitting a fifty dollar bill into smaller denominations, such as twenty-dollar bills, ten-dollar bills, or five-dollar bills. It is often used when someone needs smaller bills for various purposes.

  • For instance, “Can you divide a fifty? I need two twenties and a ten.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “I always divide a fifty into two twenties and a ten and use them for different expenses.”
  • A person might ask a friend, “Can you divide a fifty for me? I need some smaller bills for the parking garage.”

50. Make Change for a Fifty

This phrase refers to providing smaller denominations, such as twenty-dollar bills, ten-dollar bills, or five-dollar bills, in exchange for a fifty dollar bill. It is often used when someone needs smaller bills for various purposes.

  • For example, “Can you make change for a fifty? I need some tens and twenties.”
  • In a conversation about cash flow, someone might say, “I always make change for a fifty before going to the fair.”
  • A person might ask a cashier, “Can you make change for a fifty? I need some smaller bills for tipping.”

51. Get Change for a Twenty

This phrase is commonly used when someone needs smaller bills or coins in exchange for a twenty-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I need to get change for a twenty so I can use the vending machine.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want to get change for a twenty?”
  • When someone has a larger bill and wants to break it, they might say, “Can you help me get change for a twenty?”

52. Divide a Hundred

This slang phrase is used when someone wants to divide a hundred-dollar bill into smaller amounts, usually for convenience or to distribute money.

  • For instance, “Let’s divide a hundred and give everyone their fair share.”
  • In a group setting, one person might say, “I’ll divide a hundred and give each person $20.”
  • When discussing budgeting, someone might suggest, “You can divide a hundred into five $20 bills.”

53. Split a Five

This expression is used when someone wants to divide a five-dollar bill into smaller amounts, often to share the cost of something.

  • For example, “Let’s split a five and each pay $2.50.”
  • In a restaurant, a group might say, “We can split a five and leave a tip.”
  • When discussing a small expense, someone might suggest, “We can split a five and each contribute a dollar.”

54. Make Change for a Hundred

This phrase is used when someone needs to exchange a hundred-dollar bill for smaller bills or coins.

  • For instance, “I need to make change for a hundred to pay for parking.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want to make change for a hundred?”
  • When someone has a larger bill and wants to break it, they might say, “Can you help me make change for a hundred?”

55. Get Change for a Ten

This slang phrase is commonly used when someone needs smaller bills or coins in exchange for a ten-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I need to get change for a ten to use the vending machine.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you want to get change for a ten?”
  • When someone has a larger bill and wants to break it, they might say, “Can you help me get change for a ten?”
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