Top 65 Slang For Rumored – Meaning & Usage

Rumors have a way of spreading like wildfire, especially in today’s hyper-connected world. But have you ever wondered what the cool kids are saying when it comes to gossip and whispers? Look no further as we’ve gathered the latest and most popular slang for rumored that will have you in the loop and ready to spill the tea with confidence. Stay ahead of the curve and brush up on your rumor mill vocabulary with our handy guide!

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1. Buzz

This term refers to rumors or gossip that is circulating among people. It implies that there is a lot of talk or discussion about a particular topic or event.

  • For example, “There’s a lot of buzz about the new restaurant opening downtown.”
  • A celebrity might say, “I heard some buzz about a potential collaboration with a famous designer.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the buzz on the upcoming election?”

2. Word on the street

This phrase is used to describe rumors or gossip that is spreading among the general public. It suggests that the information is not official or verified.

  • For instance, “The word on the street is that there’s going to be a surprise guest at the concert.”
  • A friend might say, “I heard the word on the street is that they’re breaking up.”
  • Someone might comment, “I don’t know if it’s true, but the word on the street is that they’re getting engaged.”

3. Chatter

This term refers to informal or casual conversations about rumors or unconfirmed information. It suggests that people are discussing something without concrete evidence.

  • For example, “There’s a lot of chatter about a possible company merger.”
  • A coworker might say, “I overheard some chatter about layoffs in the office.”
  • Someone might mention, “The chatter around town is that they’re planning a big event.”

4. Scuttlebutt

This word is often used in a military or naval context to describe rumors or gossip that is circulating within a specific community or group. It implies that the information is unofficial or not confirmed.

  • For instance, “There’s a lot of scuttlebutt among the soldiers about upcoming deployments.”
  • A sailor might say, “The scuttlebutt is that we’re getting a new commanding officer.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the scuttlebutt on the upcoming mission?”

5. Grapevine

This term refers to the informal network or channels through which rumors or gossip spread. It suggests that information is being passed along from person to person.

  • For example, “I heard it through the grapevine that they’re planning a surprise party.”
  • A friend might say, “The grapevine has it that they’re considering a job offer.”
  • Someone might comment, “The grapevine is buzzing with news about the upcoming product launch.”

6. Whispers

This term refers to the act of spreading rumors or sharing information in a secretive or hushed manner. “Whispers” often implies that the information being shared is not widely known or confirmed.

  • For instance, “There are whispers going around that she might be getting a promotion.”
  • In a discussion about celebrity relationships, someone might say, “I heard whispers that they are dating.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you heard any whispers about the upcoming product launch?”

7. Speculation

This word refers to forming opinions or making guesses based on incomplete information or evidence. “Speculation” often involves discussing possible outcomes or scenarios without concrete proof.

  • For example, “There is a lot of speculation about who will win the election.”
  • During a sports game, a commentator might say, “The coach’s decision to bench the star player is causing a lot of speculation.”
  • A person might engage in speculation by saying, “I think they’re going to announce a new product at the conference.”

8. Hearsay

This term refers to information or stories that are passed along by word of mouth, often without any concrete evidence or proof. “Hearsay” can also imply that the information being shared is unreliable or unverified.

  • For instance, “I heard it through the hearsay that they’re planning to lay off employees.”
  • In a discussion about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “All the hearsay suggests that they were involved.”
  • A person might dismiss a rumor by saying, “I don’t pay attention to hearsay. I wait for official announcements.”

9. Dirt

This slang term refers to juicy or scandalous information, often involving personal or private details. “Dirt” is often used to describe rumors or gossip that may be damaging or embarrassing to a person or group.

  • For example, “She’s always digging up dirt on her coworkers.”
  • In a discussion about a politician’s scandal, someone might say, “The media loves to uncover dirt on public figures.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful what you share. You never know who might use it as dirt against you.”

10. Murmurs

This term refers to low or indistinct sounds, often used metaphorically to describe rumors or rumblings of a potential event or situation. “Murmurs” suggests that there is talk or speculation happening, but it may not be widely known or confirmed.

  • For instance, “There are murmurs of a possible company merger.”
  • In a discussion about a celebrity’s upcoming album, someone might say, “I’ve heard murmurs of a surprise collaboration.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you heard any murmurs about changes in the company’s management?”

11. Insider info

Insider info refers to information that is not widely known or publicly available. It often comes from someone who has access to privileged knowledge or is directly involved in a situation.

  • For example, “I heard some insider info that the company is planning to launch a new product next month.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t reveal my source, but I have some insider info about the upcoming merger.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have any insider info on the latest celebrity scandal?”

12. Lowdown

The lowdown refers to the inside scoop or detailed information about a particular situation or topic. It typically includes all the important facts and details that are not widely known.

  • For instance, “Give me the lowdown on what happened at the party last night.”
  • A person might say, “I have the lowdown on the new restaurant opening in town. It’s going to be amazing.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you give me the lowdown on the latest fashion trends?”

13. Skinny

Skinny is a slang term used to describe secret information or details that are not widely known or publicly shared. It can also refer to the inside scoop or exclusive knowledge about something.

  • For example, “I’ve got the skinny on who’s going to win the competition.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t share the skinny with you just yet, but trust me, it’s big.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have the skinny on the upcoming product launch?”

14. Hush-hush

Hush-hush is a term used to describe something that is kept secret or confidential. It implies that the information is not meant to be shared or discussed openly.

  • For instance, “The project is hush-hush right now. We can’t talk about it.”
  • A person might say, “I heard some hush-hush rumors about a celebrity wedding happening soon.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the hush-hush behind the sudden change in management?”

15. Under wraps

Under wraps is a phrase used to describe something that is being kept secret or hidden from public knowledge. It suggests that the information is being intentionally concealed or not yet ready to be revealed.

  • For example, “The new product is still under wraps, but it’s going to be a game-changer.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t tell you what it is yet, it’s still under wraps.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the story behind the under wraps project that everyone is talking about?”

16. Off the record

This phrase is used to indicate that the information being shared should not be attributed to the source. It suggests that the information is unofficial and not for public knowledge.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “He told me off the record that the company is planning layoffs.”
  • In a conversation about a sensitive topic, someone might say, “Off the record, I heard that they’re getting a divorce.”
  • A politician might speak to a reporter and say, “I can give you some off-the-record insights into the upcoming legislation.”

17. Behind closed doors

This phrase refers to private or confidential conversations or activities that are not meant to be shared with others. It implies that something is happening away from public view.

  • For instance, “The negotiations took place behind closed doors, away from the media.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The decision was made behind closed doors, without public input.”
  • A celebrity might have a scandalous affair and say, “What happens behind closed doors should stay behind closed doors.”

18. Gossip

Gossip refers to the casual or idle talk about other people’s private lives, often involving rumors or unverified information. It can be shared in social settings or through various forms of communication.

  • For example, “Did you hear the gossip about our boss dating a coworker?”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity, someone might say, “The gossip magazines are filled with rumors about their breakup.”
  • A teenager might say, “I love catching up on the latest gossip about my classmates.”

19. Tattle

To tattle means to report someone’s wrongdoing or secrets to an authority figure or someone in a position of power. It often implies that the information being shared is meant to get the person in trouble.

  • For instance, “She tattled on her friend for cheating on the test.”
  • In a school setting, one might say, “Nobody likes a tattle-tale.”
  • A parent might scold their child and say, “Don’t tattle on your siblings unless it’s something serious.”

20. Inside info

Inside info refers to information that is known only by a select few, often those who are closely involved or have access to privileged information. It suggests that the information is not widely known.

  • For example, “I have some inside info about the upcoming product launch.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team, someone might say, “I heard some inside info that they’re considering trading their star player.”
  • A businessperson might say, “Having inside info can give you a competitive advantage in the market.”

21. Street talk

This term refers to rumors or information that is spread through informal channels, such as conversations on the street or in social circles.

  • For example, “I heard some street talk that they’re getting married.”
  • In a discussion about celebrity news, someone might say, “Have you heard the latest street talk about that actor?”
  • A person might dismiss a rumor by saying, “Don’t believe everything you hear through street talk.”

22. Dish

This slang term refers to information or gossip, often about someone’s personal life or private matters.

  • For instance, “She always has the dish on everyone in town.”
  • In a conversation about a scandalous event, someone might ask, “What’s the dish on that situation?”
  • A person sharing gossip might say, “I have some juicy dish to spill about our coworkers.”

23. Hot tip

This term is used to describe information or advice that is considered valuable or exclusive, often related to upcoming events or opportunities.

  • For example, “I got a hot tip on a new restaurant opening in town.”
  • In a discussion about investing, someone might say, “I have a hot tip on a stock that’s about to skyrocket.”
  • A person might share a hot tip about a sale or discount by saying, “I heard a hot tip that there’s a big sale happening this weekend.”

24. Secret sauce

This slang term refers to information or knowledge that is considered secret or special, often related to a particular skill or expertise.

  • For instance, “He’s a great chef, but he won’t share his secret sauce recipe.”
  • In a conversation about success in a particular field, someone might say, “Do you know the secret sauce to becoming a top performer?”
  • A person might ask for the secret sauce to a successful relationship by saying, “What’s the secret sauce to a long and happy marriage?”

25. Juice

This term refers to rumors or insider information, often related to the private or personal lives of individuals.

  • For example, “I heard some juicy juice about their breakup.”
  • In a discussion about celebrity gossip, someone might ask, “What’s the latest juice on that famous couple?”
  • A person might share some juicy juice about a scandal by saying, “I’ve got some juice that will shock everyone.”

26. Innuendo

An innuendo is an indirect or subtle suggestion, usually with negative or scandalous undertones. It is often used to imply something without explicitly stating it.

  • For example, “There were a lot of innuendos about their relationship, but nothing was ever confirmed.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might say, “The candidate’s speech was filled with innuendos about his opponent’s character.”
  • A gossip magazine might publish an article with the headline, “The innuendos surrounding their breakup are shocking.”

27. Skepticism

Skepticism refers to a state of doubt or disbelief, especially towards rumors or unverified information. It is the act of questioning the validity or truthfulness of something.

  • For instance, “There is a lot of skepticism surrounding the claims made by that anonymous source.”
  • In a conversation about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “I approach these theories with healthy skepticism.”
  • A journalist might write, “The public’s skepticism towards the government’s official statement is growing.”

28. Supposition

Supposition refers to an assumption or guess made based on limited information or evidence. It is often used to discuss rumors or speculative ideas.

  • For example, “The supposition that they are dating has been circulating for weeks.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “We cannot base our decisions on mere suppositions.”
  • A news article might state, “The supposition that aliens exist has captivated the public’s imagination.”

29. Scandal

Scandal refers to a situation or event that is considered morally or socially unacceptable. It often involves rumors or revelations that damage someone’s reputation or cause public outrage.

  • For instance, “The scandal surrounding the politician’s financial dealings led to his resignation.”
  • In a celebrity gossip magazine, an article might discuss, “The latest scandal involving a famous actor and his alleged affair.”
  • A news anchor might report, “The company’s CEO is facing a scandal over allegations of corruption.”

30. Fable

A fable is a fictional story or legend that often contains a moral lesson. In the context of rumors, it refers to a story or piece of information that is widely believed but lacks evidence or credibility.

  • For example, “The fable that eating carrots improves your eyesight has been debunked.”
  • In a discussion about urban legends, someone might mention, “There are many fables about haunted houses in this town.”
  • A teacher might say, “Don’t believe everything you hear – some stories are just fables.”

31. Myth

A myth is a traditional story or legend that explains the beliefs or customs of a society. It is often based on supernatural or extraordinary events that are not supported by evidence.

  • For example, “The myth of Atlantis tells the story of a great civilization that sank into the sea.”
  • In a discussion about urban legends, someone might say, “Have you heard the myth of the haunted house in the neighborhood?”
  • A person might dismiss a false rumor by saying, “That’s just a myth, it’s not true.”

32. Legend

A legend is a person who is widely known and celebrated for their exceptional achievements or deeds. It is often used to describe someone who has become a prominent figure due to their extraordinary skills or accomplishments.

  • For instance, “Michael Jordan is a basketball legend.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “Bob Dylan is a living legend.”
  • A person might refer to a fictional character as a legend, saying “Sherlock Holmes is a legend in detective fiction.”

33. Tale

A tale refers to a story or narrative, often with fictional elements. It can be used to describe a story that is passed down through generations or a fictional account of events.

  • For example, “The tale of Cinderella is a classic fairy tale.”
  • In a discussion about folklore, someone might mention, “The Brothers Grimm collected and published many famous tales.”
  • A person might say, “Let me tell you a tale about my adventures last summer.”

34. Story

A story is a narrative or account of events, often involving characters and a plot. It can refer to both fictional and non-fictional narratives.

  • For instance, “I heard a funny story about a cat and a dog.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might mention, “The Great Gatsby is a classic American story.”
  • A person might say, “I have a story to tell you about my trip to Paris.”

35. Confidential

Confidential refers to information that is meant to be kept secret or private. It can be used to describe rumors or information that is not meant to be shared publicly.

  • For example, “I heard some confidential information about the upcoming product launch.”
  • In a discussion about classified documents, someone might say, “Those files are highly confidential.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful, that information is confidential and should not be shared.”

36. Insider

An insider is someone who has access to confidential or exclusive information, typically within a specific organization or industry. They are knowledgeable about internal affairs and can provide valuable insights or leaks to the public.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “According to an insider at the company, layoffs are imminent.”
  • In a political context, a whistleblower might be referred to as an insider exposing corruption.
  • A fan of a celebrity might claim, “I have insider knowledge about their upcoming album release.”

37. Classified

Classified refers to information that is restricted and not available to the general public. It often pertains to sensitive government or military matters, and its disclosure can be illegal or result in serious consequences.

  • For instance, a spy movie might feature a character saying, “That document is classified, and only top-level officials can access it.”
  • In a news report, a journalist might mention, “The leaked classified information revealed secret surveillance programs.”
  • A person discussing national security might argue, “Certain information needs to be kept classified to protect the country.”

38. Covert

Covert refers to actions or operations that are concealed or hidden from public knowledge. It implies a level of secrecy and often involves espionage, undercover work, or clandestine activities.

  • For example, a spy novel might describe a character as “engaged in covert operations behind enemy lines.”
  • In a discussion about intelligence agencies, someone might mention, “Covert operations are essential for gathering classified information.”
  • A person speculating about hidden motives might say, “There could be a covert agenda behind these recent events.”

39. Stealth

Stealth refers to the ability to move or act in a quiet, discreet, or unnoticeable manner. It is often associated with stealth technology or tactics used by military aircraft, submarines, or special forces.

  • For instance, a video game might describe a stealthy character as “able to sneak past enemies without being detected.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might mention, “Hackers often use stealth techniques to infiltrate systems.”
  • A person describing a quiet and discreet person might say, “He moves with stealth, always observing but rarely speaking.”

40. Clandestine

Clandestine refers to actions or operations conducted in secrecy or with an intention to conceal. It implies a level of hiddenness and often involves illegal or unauthorized activities.

  • For example, a spy movie might feature a character saying, “We need to establish a clandestine meeting to exchange information.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might mention, “Clandestine drug operations are a major concern for law enforcement.”
  • A person speculating about hidden societies might say, “There are rumors of a clandestine group pulling the strings behind the scenes.”

41. Stealthy

Stealthy is a term used to describe something that is done in a secretive or discreet manner. It implies that the action or information is not meant to be easily noticed or discovered.

  • For example, “They had a stealthy meeting in the back room to discuss their plans.”
  • In a conversation about a secret operation, someone might say, “We need to be stealthy to avoid detection by the enemy.”
  • A person discussing a hidden agenda might mention, “There seems to be some stealthy maneuvering happening behind the scenes.”

42. Surreptitious

Surreptitious refers to something that is done secretly or in a way that avoids attention. It suggests that the action or information is intentionally concealed or hidden from others.

  • For instance, “He made a surreptitious move to steal the document without anyone noticing.”
  • In a conversation about espionage, someone might say, “The spy was skilled at surreptitious operations.”
  • A person discussing a hidden relationship might mention, “They had a surreptitious affair that no one knew about.”

43. Under the table

Under the table is a phrase used to describe something that is done secretly or illegally, often involving bribes or illegal transactions. It suggests that the action or information is hidden from authorities or the public.

  • For example, “They made a deal under the table to avoid paying taxes.”
  • In a conversation about corruption, someone might say, “Many illegal activities happen under the table.”
  • A person discussing a secret agreement might mention, “They reached an under the table agreement to manipulate the market.”

44. Behind the scenes

Behind the scenes refers to the hidden or unseen aspects of a situation or event. It implies that there is more to the story or situation than what is publicly known or visible.

  • For instance, “There was a lot of drama happening behind the scenes of the movie.”
  • In a conversation about a political decision, someone might say, “There were a lot of negotiations happening behind the scenes.”
  • A person discussing a secret plan might mention, “They orchestrated everything behind the scenes to ensure their success.”

45. Unverified

Unverified refers to something that has not been confirmed or proven to be true. It suggests that the information or rumor is lacking evidence or credibility.

  • For example, “The news report was based on unverified sources.”
  • In a conversation about gossip, someone might say, “Don’t believe everything you hear, it could be unverified information.”
  • A person discussing a rumor might mention, “I heard an unverified rumor that they are getting married.”

46. Unconfirmed

When a piece of information or news is not yet confirmed, it means that there is no official confirmation or evidence to support it.

  • For example, “The rumors about their breakup are unconfirmed at this time.”
  • A news article might state, “The reports of a new product launch are unconfirmed by the company.”
  • A person might say, “I heard an unconfirmed rumor that they’re planning to close the store.”

47. Unsubstantiated

When something is unsubstantiated, it means that there is no evidence or proof to back it up.

  • For instance, “The claims of paranormal activity are unsubstantiated and based on hearsay.”
  • A news report might state, “The allegations against the politician remain unsubstantiated.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t believe the unsubstantiated rumors about their involvement in the scandal.”

48. Unreliable

When something is unreliable, it means that it cannot be trusted or relied upon.

  • For example, “The source of the information is known to be unreliable.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful, that website is known for spreading unreliable rumors.”
  • A news article might state, “The study’s methodology was deemed unreliable by experts in the field.”

49. Dubious

When something is dubious, it means that it raises doubts or suspicions.

  • For instance, “The story seems dubious, with inconsistencies in the details.”
  • A person might say, “I find their explanation for the missing money to be dubious.”
  • A news report might state, “The company’s financial practices are under investigation due to dubious transactions.”

50. Questionable

When something is questionable, it means that it raises doubts or suspicions about its truth or reliability.

  • For example, “The source of the information is questionable and lacks credibility.”
  • A person might say, “Their motives for spreading the rumor are questionable.”
  • A news article might state, “The study’s methodology has been called into question by other researchers.”

51. Shady

This term is used to describe something or someone that is not trustworthy or seems dishonest. It is often used when referring to questionable actions or behavior.

  • For example, “That guy seems really shady, I wouldn’t trust him.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial business deal, someone might say, “There’s something shady going on behind the scenes.”
  • Another usage might be, “I heard some shady rumors about that celebrity, but I don’t know if they’re true.”

52. Fishy

Similar to “shady,” this term is used to describe something that seems suspicious or not quite right. It is often used when there is a feeling of doubt or skepticism about a situation or person.

  • For instance, “The whole story sounds fishy, I don’t think they’re telling the truth.”
  • In a conversation about a strange occurrence, someone might say, “There’s something fishy about that situation.”
  • Another example could be, “I found her explanation for being late to be a bit fishy, it didn’t quite add up.”

53. Sketchy

This term is used to describe something that is doubtful or unreliable. It implies a lack of trust or uncertainty about a situation or person.

  • For example, “I don’t know about that website, it looks sketchy.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious character, someone might say, “He gives off a sketchy vibe, I would stay away from him.”
  • Another usage could be, “The details of the story are sketchy, we need more information to verify its accuracy.”

54. Dodgy

Similar to “shady” and “sketchy,” this term is used to describe something that is questionable or suspicious. It implies a sense of caution or wariness.

  • For instance, “I don’t trust that person, they seem dodgy.”
  • In a conversation about a dubious deal, someone might say, “There’s something dodgy about their business practices.”
  • Another example could be, “The whole situation feels dodgy, I think we should be careful.”

55. Debatable

This term is used to describe something that is open to discussion or disagreement. It suggests that there are different opinions or viewpoints on the matter.

  • For example, “Whether or not he will run for president again is debatable.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, someone might say, “The effectiveness of this policy is debatable.”
  • Another usage could be, “The rumor about their breakup is debatable, some say it’s true while others believe it’s just gossip.”

56. Controversial

This term is used to describe information or claims that are the subject of intense disagreement or contention. It suggests that there are differing opinions or perspectives on the matter.

  • For example, “The controversial rumors about the candidate’s past are causing a stir in the election.”
  • In a heated discussion, someone might say, “Let’s not get into the controversial rumors surrounding that event.”
  • A news article might state, “The controversial rumor about the company’s unethical practices has sparked public outrage.”

57. Disputed

This term indicates that there is uncertainty or disagreement regarding the accuracy or truthfulness of the information or claims. It suggests that there are conflicting opinions or evidence surrounding the rumor.

  • For instance, “The disputed rumor about the celebrity’s secret marriage has left fans confused.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “The disputed claims made by the witness cast doubt on the accused’s guilt.”
  • A journalist might report, “The disputed rumor regarding the company’s financial troubles has led to conflicting reports.”

58. Unproven

This term suggests that there is no concrete evidence or proof to support the rumor. It implies that the information or claims are lacking in substantiation or verification.

  • For example, “The unproven rumor about the new product release has left consumers skeptical.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I wouldn’t believe those unproven claims without solid evidence.”
  • A social media post might read, “Be cautious of spreading unproven rumors that can cause unnecessary panic.”

59. Unfounded

This term indicates that the rumor is completely without foundation or support. It suggests that there is no valid or reliable evidence to back up the information or claims.

  • For instance, “The unfounded rumor about the company’s bankruptcy caused unnecessary panic among investors.”
  • In a discussion, someone might state, “Those unfounded allegations lack any credibility or proof.”
  • A news headline might read, “Experts debunk unfounded rumor about health risks associated with a popular food.”

60. Groundless

This term suggests that the rumor is without any legitimate justification or reason. It implies that there is no logical or rational basis for the information or claims.

  • For example, “The groundless rumor about the politician’s involvement in a scandal was quickly dismissed.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Ignore those groundless rumors. There’s no evidence to support them.”
  • A social media comment might read, “Stop spreading groundless rumors that only serve to create unnecessary fear and anxiety.”

61. Unsupported

This term refers to a rumor or claim that lacks evidence or support. It suggests that the information is unfounded and should not be taken seriously.

  • For example, “That rumor about the company going bankrupt is completely unsupported.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “Most of these claims are unsupported and rely on speculation.”
  • A person might dismiss a false accusation by stating, “The allegations against me are completely unsupported and have no basis in reality.”

62. Unwarranted

When something is described as unwarranted, it means that it is without reason or justification. In the context of rumors, it suggests that the information being spread is unfounded and lacks any valid basis.

  • For instance, “The rumors about her cheating on her partner are completely unwarranted.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “The criticism he’s facing is unwarranted and based on false information.”
  • A person might defend themselves by saying, “The accusations against me are unwarranted and have no basis in truth.”

63. Unjustified

This term is used to describe a rumor or claim that lacks justification or evidence. It suggests that the information being spread is unfounded and cannot be proven.

  • For example, “The rumors about her stealing from the company are completely unjustified.”
  • In a discussion about gossip, someone might say, “We should avoid spreading unjustified rumors about others.”
  • A person might deny an allegation by stating, “The accusations against me are unjustified and have no basis in fact.”

64. Unreasonable

When something is described as unreasonable in the context of rumors, it means that it is not based on sound judgment or logic. It suggests that the information being circulated is speculative and lacks credibility.

  • For instance, “The rumor that he’s an alien is completely unreasonable.”
  • In a conversation about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “Many of these claims are unreasonable and defy scientific evidence.”
  • A person might dismiss a false rumor by stating, “The story being spread is completely unreasonable and lacks any basis in reality.”

65. Inaccurate

This term refers to a rumor or claim that is not accurate or correct. It suggests that the information being shared is false and should not be trusted.

  • For example, “The rumor that she’s quitting her job is completely inaccurate.”
  • In a discussion about misinformation, someone might say, “We need to fact-check before spreading inaccurate rumors.”
  • A person might correct a false claim by stating, “The information you heard is inaccurate and has been debunked.”
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