Top 25 Slang For Quit – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to throwing in the towel, sometimes regular words just won’t cut it. That’s where we come in. We’ve rounded up the most hip and trendy slang terms for quitting that are sure to catch your attention. Say goodbye to the mundane and hello to a whole new world of expressive ways to say “I’m out!”

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1. Bail

To bail means to leave a situation or place abruptly, often without warning or explanation.

  • For example, “I can’t stand this party anymore, I’m gonna bail.”
  • A person might say, “I bailed on the meeting because it was going nowhere.”
  • Another might explain, “He bailed on our plans at the last minute.”

2. Peace out

“Peace out” is a casual way of saying goodbye or leaving a situation.

  • For instance, “I’m tired of this place, peace out!”
  • A person might say, “I gotta go, peace out everyone.”
  • Another might use it as a farewell, “Peace out, see you tomorrow!”

3. Chuck up the deuces

To chuck up the deuces means to make a peace sign with two fingers as a way of saying goodbye or indicating that one is leaving.

  • For example, “I’m outta here, chucking up the deuces!”
  • A person might say, “Before I go, let me chuck up the deuces.”
  • Another might use it as a farewell, “Chuck up the deuces, see you later!”

4. Call it a day

To call it a day means to decide to stop working or participating in an activity for the rest of the day.

  • For instance, “It’s getting late, let’s call it a day.”
  • A person might say, “I’m tired, I think I’ll call it a day.”
  • Another might explain, “We’ve accomplished enough, let’s call it a day.”

5. Throw in the towel

To throw in the towel means to give up or surrender in a difficult or challenging situation.

  • For example, “I’ve tried my best, but I think it’s time to throw in the towel.”
  • A person might say, “I’m exhausted, I’m throwing in the towel.”
  • Another might use it metaphorically, “After multiple failed attempts, he finally threw in the towel.”

6. Hang it up

This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is quitting or retiring from a particular activity or profession. It can also mean to stop trying or to abandon a pursuit.

  • For example, a professional athlete might announce, “After 20 years in the game, I’ve decided to hang it up.”
  • A person discussing a failed business venture might say, “I invested so much time and money, but it’s time to hang it up.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult project, someone might suggest, “Maybe it’s time to hang it up and move on to something else.”

7. Pack it in

This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is quitting or ending an activity. It can also mean to stop working or to stop trying.

  • For instance, at the end of a long day of work, someone might say, “I’m exhausted. Let’s pack it in for today.”
  • A person discussing a failed relationship might say, “We tried to make it work, but it’s time to pack it in.”
  • In a conversation about a frustrating project, someone might suggest, “I think it’s time to pack it in and start fresh tomorrow.”

8. Walk away

This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is leaving a situation or quitting a particular activity. It can also mean to disengage or distance oneself from a problem or conflict.

  • For example, in a heated argument, someone might say, “I can’t deal with this anymore. I’m just going to walk away.”
  • A person discussing a toxic work environment might say, “I realized it was time to walk away for the sake of my mental health.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult decision, someone might suggest, “Sometimes the best thing to do is just walk away and start over.”

9. Bow out

This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is voluntarily withdrawing from a situation or quitting a particular activity. It can also mean to gracefully exit or relinquish a position of authority.

  • For instance, in a competition, a participant might say, “I’ve given it my all, but it’s time to bow out.”
  • A person discussing a political campaign might say, “After careful consideration, I’ve decided to bow out of the race.”
  • In a conversation about a group project, someone might suggest, “If you’re overwhelmed, it’s okay to bow out and let someone else take the lead.”

10. Cash in one’s chips

This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is quitting or surrendering in a situation. It can also mean to accept defeat or to acknowledge that one’s efforts have been unsuccessful.

  • For example, in a game or competition, a participant might say, “I’ve lost too many rounds. I think it’s time to cash in my chips.”
  • A person discussing a failed business venture might say, “After years of struggling, I’ve decided to cash in my chips and move on.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging project, someone might suggest, “If we can’t find a solution, maybe it’s time to cash in our chips and try a different approach.”

11. Clock out

This phrase is commonly used to indicate the end of a work shift or quitting time. It refers to the act of recording the time you finish work by clocking out with a time card or electronic system.

  • For example, “I can’t wait to clock out and relax for the evening.”
  • A coworker might say, “Let’s finish up these tasks and then we can all clock out.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, someone might mention, “I try to prioritize self-care by always clocking out on time.”

12. Hang up one’s boots

This expression is often used in the context of quitting a job or profession, particularly when someone has been in the field for a long time and decides to stop working.

  • For instance, “After 30 years in the industry, he finally decided to hang up his boots.”
  • A retired athlete might say, “It was a tough decision, but I knew it was time to hang up my boots.”
  • In a discussion about career transitions, someone might mention, “I’m considering hanging up my boots in finance and pursuing a new passion.”

13. Jack it in

This slang phrase means to quit or give up on something, often used in the context of a job or activity that someone finds frustrating or unfulfilling.

  • For example, “He couldn’t handle the stress anymore, so he decided to jack it in.”
  • A person discussing their career might say, “I realized I wasn’t passionate about my job, so I jacked it in and started my own business.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might mention, “Sometimes you have to jack it in and move on to something better.”

14. Knock off

This phrase is commonly used to indicate the end of a work shift or quitting time. It implies completing tasks and leaving work behind.

  • For instance, “Let’s knock off for the day and grab a drink.”
  • A coworker might say, “We’ve been working hard all morning, let’s knock off for lunch.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, someone might mention, “I try to prioritize my personal life by knocking off at a reasonable hour.”

15. Chuck

This slang term means to quit or give up on something, often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I’ve been trying to learn guitar, but I think I’m going to chuck it.”
  • A person discussing a failed project might say, “I had to chuck the whole thing and start over.”
  • In a conversation about making lifestyle changes, someone might mention, “I decided to chuck my unhealthy habits and focus on my well-being.”

16. Dip

To leave abruptly or without notice. It can also mean to avoid or evade someone or something.

  • For example, “I’m going to dip out of this party early.”
  • In a conversation about avoiding someone, one might say, “I saw my ex at the mall, so I dipped into a store to avoid them.”
  • A person might use this slang to express their desire to leave a boring event, saying, “I’m ready to dip out of this lecture.”

17. Bounce

To leave a place or situation in a hasty or swift manner.

  • For instance, “I need to bounce before it starts raining.”
  • In a conversation about leaving work early, one might say, “I’m going to bounce out of the office a bit early today.”
  • A person might use this slang to express their desire to leave a party, saying, “Let’s bounce, this place is dead.”

18. Give it up

To quit or stop doing a specific activity or behavior.

  • For example, “I’ve been trying to quit smoking, but I just can’t give it up.”
  • In a conversation about a bad habit, one might say, “It’s time to give up junk food and start eating healthier.”
  • A person might use this slang to express their frustration with a difficult task, saying, “I give up, I can’t figure out this math problem.”

19. Say goodbye

To quit or end one’s involvement in a particular activity or situation.

  • For instance, “I need to say goodbye to this project, it’s too much for me to handle.”
  • In a conversation about leaving a job, one might say, “I’ve decided to say goodbye to this company and pursue a new opportunity.”
  • A person might use this slang to express their decision to quit a hobby, saying, “I think it’s time to say goodbye to playing the guitar.”

20. Take a hike

To leave a place or situation, often in a dismissive or rude manner.

  • For example, “I told him to take a hike after he insulted me.”
  • In a conversation about dealing with annoying people, one might say, “If they bother you, just tell them to take a hike.”
  • A person might use this slang to express their frustration with someone, saying, “I can’t stand their attitude anymore, they can take a hike.”

21. Hang up one’s hat

This phrase is often used to indicate someone’s decision to retire or leave a job or activity permanently.

  • For example, “After 30 years of working in the corporate world, John decided to hang up his hat and enjoy his retirement.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “After a long and successful career, the legendary player is finally hanging up his hat.”
  • In a discussion about career changes, someone might mention, “Sometimes it’s necessary to hang up your hat and pursue a new path.”

22. Knock it off

This phrase is used to tell someone to stop doing a particular action or behavior.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “Knock it off with the teasing, it’s not nice.”
  • In a workplace setting, a supervisor might say to an employee, “Knock it off with the procrastination and get back to work.”
  • During a heated argument, one person might say to the other, “Just knock it off and let’s find a solution.”

23. Put an end to

This phrase is used to describe the act of stopping or terminating something, often in a decisive manner.

  • For example, “The company decided to put an end to the project due to financial constraints.”
  • In a discussion about bad habits, someone might say, “I finally put an end to my smoking habit.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “It’s time to put an end to the cheating and start taking responsibility for your own work.”

24. Cease and desist

This phrase is often used in legal contexts to demand that someone stop a particular action or behavior.

  • For instance, a lawyer might send a cease and desist letter to someone infringing on their client’s copyright.
  • In a discussion about online harassment, someone might say, “The victim should contact the authorities and demand the harasser to cease and desist.”
  • A company might issue a statement saying, “We have taken legal action to make the counterfeit product manufacturers cease and desist their operations.”

25. Retire from

This phrase is used to describe the act of leaving a job or position, often after reaching a certain age or milestone.

  • For example, “After 40 years of service, she decided to retire from her position as CEO.”
  • In a discussion about professional athletes, someone might say, “Many players retire from their sport in their late 30s or early 40s.”
  • A teacher might announce to their students, “I have decided to retire from teaching at the end of this school year.”
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