Top 35 Slang For Windy – Meaning & Usage

When the wind starts howling and leaves dance in the air, it’s time to brush up on the slang for windy. Whether you’re a weather enthusiast or just looking to spice up your vocabulary, we’ve got you covered with a list that will blow you away (pun intended). So, hold onto your hats and get ready to ride the breeze with us!

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1. Blustery

When the wind is strong and gusty, it is described as blustery. This term is often used to describe weather conditions or the wind itself.

  • For example, “The blustery winds knocked down trees and power lines.”
  • A weather report might state, “Expect blustery conditions with wind speeds up to 40 mph.”
  • Someone might say, “I love going for a walk on a blustery day, it’s so invigorating.”

2. Gusty

Gusty refers to wind that comes in sudden and strong bursts. It is often used to describe the intensity or nature of the wind.

  • For instance, “The gusty winds made it difficult to keep my umbrella up.”
  • A person might comment, “Be careful driving, it’s very gusty out there.”
  • During a storm, someone might say, “The gusty winds are rattling the windows.”

3. Breezy

Breezy describes a pleasant and gentle wind. It is often used to describe a comfortable and refreshing level of wind.

  • For example, “It was a breezy day at the beach, perfect for flying kites.”
  • A person might say, “I love going for a run when it’s breezy outside, it keeps me cool.”
  • Someone might comment, “The breeze coming through the window feels so nice and breezy.”

4. Windy City

The term “Windy City” is a nickname for Chicago, Illinois. It does not refer to the windiness of the city, but rather to the long-windedness of its politicians in the late 19th century.

  • For instance, “I’m planning a trip to the Windy City next month.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve always wanted to visit the Windy City and try their famous deep-dish pizza.”
  • Someone might comment, “Chicago is known as the Windy City because of its political history, not the weather.”

5. Zephyr

Zephyr refers to a soft and gentle breeze, often associated with a calm and peaceful atmosphere.

  • For example, “We enjoyed a picnic in the park, feeling the zephyr on our faces.”
  • A person might say, “The zephyr rustled the leaves on the trees, creating a soothing sound.”
  • Someone might comment, “I love sitting by the ocean and feeling the zephyr coming off the water.”

6. Gale

A gale refers to a very strong wind, typically with a speed of 32-63 miles per hour. It is often associated with stormy weather conditions.

  • For example, “The gale blew down trees and caused power outages in the area.”
  • A sailor might say, “We had to wait for the gale to pass before setting sail.”
  • Someone might comment, “I love listening to the sound of the gale outside my window.”

7. Whirlwind

A whirlwind is a rapidly rotating column of air that is often visible as a funnel-shaped cloud. It is typically caused by atmospheric instability and can occur during thunderstorms.

  • For instance, “The whirlwind picked up debris and created a small tornado.”
  • A person might say, “I was caught in a whirlwind of emotions after receiving the good news.”
  • Someone might describe a chaotic situation as, “It was like a whirlwind of activity.”

8. Squally

Squally refers to weather that is characterized by sudden, violent bursts of wind and rain. It often indicates stormy and unsettled conditions.

  • For example, “The squally weather made it difficult to walk outside.”
  • A person might say, “I got drenched in a squally downpour.”
  • Someone might comment, “The squally winds knocked over my garden furniture.”

9. Draughty

Draughty is a term used to describe a place or environment that is characterized by the presence of drafts or cold, gusty winds. It often refers to buildings or rooms that have poor insulation or gaps.

  • For instance, “The old house was quite draughty, and we could feel the cold air coming in through the windows.”
  • A person might say, “I had to wear extra layers to stay warm in the draughty office.”
  • Someone might comment, “I always feel a draught when sitting near the window in this cafe.”

10. Aerated

Aerated is a less common slang term for windy that refers to the presence of a lot of air movement or circulation. It can also imply a feeling of lightness or freshness in the air.

  • For example, “The aerated beach was perfect for flying kites.”
  • A person might say, “I love going for walks on aerated days.”
  • Someone might comment, “The aerated breeze felt refreshing on a hot summer afternoon.”

11. Stormy

This term is used to describe weather conditions that are characterized by strong winds, often accompanied by rain or other forms of precipitation. “Stormy” typically refers to a situation where there is a lot of wind and the weather is unsettled.

  • For example, a weather forecast might say, “Expect stormy conditions with gusty winds and heavy rain.”
  • A person describing a rough day might say, “It was so stormy outside, I had trouble walking in a straight line.”
  • Someone might comment on a photo of a stormy sky, saying, “The clouds look so dark and ominous in this stormy weather.”

12. Windblown

This term refers to the appearance of someone’s hair or clothing after being exposed to strong winds. When something is windblown, it means that the wind has caused it to become disheveled or tousled.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I just came in from a walk and my hair is all windblown.”
  • A fashion magazine might describe a model’s look as “effortlessly chic with windblown hair.”
  • Someone might compliment a friend, saying, “You look great with that windblown look!”

13. Wind-swept

This term describes an area or landscape that has been exposed to strong winds for an extended period of time. When something is wind-swept, it means that the wind has shaped or affected its appearance.

  • For example, a travel blog might describe a coastal location as “a wind-swept paradise with stunning views.”
  • A photographer might capture an image of a wind-swept tree on a mountain, showcasing its resilience against the elements.
  • A hiker might describe a trail as “wind-swept and barren,“wind-swept and barren, but breathtakingly beautiful.”

14. Wind-whipped

This term is used to describe an object or surface that has been forcefully struck or affected by strong winds. When something is wind-whipped, it means that the wind has caused it to move or bend.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “The sails were wind-whipped as the ship battled against the storm.”
  • A kite enthusiast might describe their kite as “soaring through the sky,“soaring through the sky, wind-whipped and full of life.”
  • A person might comment on a windy day, saying, “The flags were wind-whipped, creating a dramatic scene.”

15. Wind-ridden

This term refers to a person or object that has been carried or blown away by the force of the wind. When someone or something is wind-ridden, it means that the wind has had a significant impact on their movement or location.

  • For example, a person might say, “My umbrella was wind-ridden and ended up in the neighbor’s yard.”
  • A kite flyer might exclaim, “My kite got caught in a gust and was wind-ridden all the way to the treetops!”
  • A hiker might describe a windy mountain trail, saying, “The gusts were so strong, it felt like I was being wind-ridden along the ridge.”

16. Wind-chilled

This term refers to the feeling of coldness caused by the wind. It describes the sensation when the wind makes the temperature feel colder than it actually is.

  • For example, “I had to bundle up because it was wind-chilled outside.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand windy days because I always get wind-chilled.”
  • Another might comment, “The wind-chilled air made my face numb.”

17. Wind-tossed

This phrase describes something that is being moved or thrown around by the force of the wind. It can refer to objects, such as leaves or debris, or even people being pushed by strong winds.

  • For instance, “The wind-tossed waves crashed against the shore.”
  • A person might say, “I felt like I was being wind-tossed while walking through the storm.”
  • Another might comment, “The wind-tossed branches made a lot of noise.”

18. Wind-lashed

This term describes something that is being struck or beaten by the wind. It can refer to objects, such as trees or buildings, or even a person’s face or body being hit by strong gusts of wind.

  • For example, “The wind-lashed flag flapped violently in the storm.”
  • A person might say, “I had to shield my eyes from the wind-lashed sand.”
  • Another might comment, “The wind-lashed rain soaked through my clothes.”

19. Wind-blasted

This phrase describes something that is being forcefully hit or struck by the wind. It can refer to objects, such as buildings or structures, or even a person being pushed or knocked over by strong gusts of wind.

  • For instance, “The wind-blasted trees leaned at an angle.”
  • A person might say, “I had to hold onto a lamppost to avoid being wind-blasted.”
  • Another might comment, “The wind-blasted sand stung my face.”

20. Wind-buffeted

This term describes something that is being pushed or shaken by the force of the wind. It can refer to objects, such as doors or windows, or even a person being jostled or knocked off balance by strong gusts of wind.

  • For example, “The wind-buffeted car swerved on the road.”
  • A person might say, “I struggled to walk straight in the wind-buffeted street.”
  • Another might comment, “The wind-buffeted tent collapsed under the strong gusts.”

21. Wind-rustled

This term is used to describe a windy environment or situation. It suggests a gentle, rustling breeze that moves through the air.

  • For example, “We took a walk along the wind-rustled beach.”
  • A person might say, “The wind-rustled leaves created a soothing sound.”
  • In a discussion about weather, someone might comment, “It’s a bit wind-rustled today, so hold onto your hats!”

22. Wind-gusted

This term refers to a sudden, strong burst of wind. It implies a powerful gust that can cause objects to move or be blown away.

  • For instance, “We had to hold onto our hats as the wind-gusted through the city.”
  • A person might say, “The wind-gusted rain made it difficult to walk.”
  • In a conversation about weather conditions, someone might comment, “The forecast is calling for wind-gusted conditions later today.”

23. Drafty

This term describes an area or space that has a lot of air movement or a slight breeze. It suggests that there may be openings or gaps that allow air to flow through.

  • For example, “The old house was quite drafty, with a constant flow of air.”
  • A person might say, “I had to wear a sweater because the office was so drafty.”
  • In a discussion about home insulation, someone might comment, “We need to fix the windows to prevent drafty rooms.”

24. Tempestuous

This term refers to a situation or environment characterized by strong and turbulent winds. It implies a sense of chaos and unpredictability.

  • For instance, “The tempestuous weather made it difficult to go outside.”
  • A person might say, “Their tempestuous relationship was filled with ups and downs.”
  • In a conversation about emotions, someone might comment, “She has a tempestuous personality, always changing her mind.”

25. Gale-force

This term is used to describe extremely strong winds, typically associated with a storm or hurricane. It implies a forceful and intense wind speed.

  • For example, “The gale-force winds knocked down trees and power lines.”
  • A person might say, “We had to take shelter from the gale-force storm.”
  • In a discussion about sailing, someone might comment, “Only experienced sailors should venture out in gale-force conditions.”

26. Windy as a typhoon

This phrase is used to describe extremely strong and powerful winds, similar to those experienced during a typhoon. It implies that the wind is forceful and capable of causing significant damage or destruction.

  • For example, “Hold on tight, it’s windy as a typhoon out there!”
  • A person might say, “The wind was so strong, it felt like it was windy as a typhoon.”
  • During a storm, someone might comment, “The trees are bending over, it’s windy as a typhoon today!”

27. Windy as a monsoon

This phrase is used to describe very strong and gusty winds, similar to those experienced during a monsoon. It implies that the wind is intense and unpredictable, often accompanied by heavy rain.

  • For instance, “Be careful, it’s windy as a monsoon outside!”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t open my umbrella, it was so windy as a monsoon.”
  • During a storm, someone might exclaim, “The wind is howling, it feels like it’s windy as a monsoon!”

28. Windy as a cyclone

This phrase is used to describe winds that are spinning or rotating rapidly, similar to those experienced during a cyclone. It implies that the wind is powerful and capable of causing significant destruction.

  • For example, “Hold onto your hat, it’s windy as a cyclone!”
  • A person might comment, “The wind is so strong, it feels like it’s windy as a cyclone.”
  • During a storm, someone might say, “I can’t stand upright, it’s windy as a cyclone out here!”

29. Windy as a gale

This phrase is used to describe strong and gusty winds, similar to those experienced during a gale. It implies that the wind is forceful and can make it difficult to walk or stand.

  • For instance, “Be careful, it’s windy as a gale today!”
  • A person might say, “I had to hold onto my hat, it was so windy as a gale.”
  • During a storm, someone might comment, “The wind is whipping around, it feels like it’s windy as a gale!”

30. Windy as a blizzard

This phrase is used to describe very strong and gusty winds, similar to those experienced during a blizzard. It implies that the wind is cold and can create blowing snow, reducing visibility.

  • For example, “Bundle up, it’s windy as a blizzard out there!”
  • A person might say, “I could barely see in front of me, it was so windy as a blizzard.”
  • During a snowstorm, someone might exclaim, “The wind is howling, it feels like it’s windy as a blizzard!”

31. Windy as a sandstorm

This phrase is used to describe extremely strong and powerful winds, similar to those experienced during a sandstorm. It implies a sense of turbulence and chaos in the air.

  • For example, “The wind was so blustery, it felt like a sandstorm was approaching.”
  • A person might say, “Hold onto your hat, it’s about to get blustery out here!”
  • In a weather report, the meteorologist might warn, “Expect blustery conditions with gusts reaching sandstorm levels.”

32. Windy as a dust storm

This term is used to describe winds that are strong and unpredictable, similar to those experienced during a dust storm. It suggests a sense of swirling and unsettled air.

  • For instance, “The wind was so gusty, it felt like a dust storm was about to hit.”
  • A person might comment, “I had trouble walking in the gusty wind, it felt like a dust storm was brewing.”
  • In a conversation about extreme weather, someone might say, “I’ve experienced gusty winds before, but nothing quite like a dust storm.”

33. Windy as a whirlwind

This phrase is used to describe winds that are light and gentle, similar to those experienced during a whirlwind. It suggests a sense of movement and energy in the air.

  • For example, “The wind was so breezy, it felt like a whirlwind was passing through.”
  • A person might say, “I love going for a walk on a breezy day, it feels like a whirlwind of fresh air.”
  • In a discussion about outdoor activities, someone might suggest, “Let’s go fly a kite on a breezy day, it’ll feel like a whirlwind of fun.”

34. Windy as a tempest

This term is used to describe winds that are fierce and turbulent, similar to those experienced during a tempest. It implies a sense of power and intensity in the air.

  • For instance, “The wind was so stormy, it felt like a tempest was brewing.”
  • A person might comment, “I had to hold onto my hat in the stormy wind, it felt like a tempest was about to hit.”
  • In a conversation about severe weather, someone might say, “I’ve never experienced winds as stormy as during a tempest.”

35. Whistling

This term is used to describe winds that are making a high-pitched, whistling sound. It suggests a sense of eerie and haunting atmosphere created by the wind.

  • For example, “The wind was howling through the trees, creating an eerie whistling sound.”
  • A person might comment, “I couldn’t sleep because of the howling wind, it sounded like a ghostly whistle.”
  • In a discussion about spooky experiences, someone might share, “I once heard the wind whistling through an abandoned house, it was incredibly eerie.”
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