Top 44 Slang For Refuse – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to talking about trash, garbage, or waste, there’s a whole new language out there that some might find surprising. From “trash talk” to “bin juice,” there are countless creative ways to refer to refuse. If you’re curious to expand your vocabulary and learn some quirky new terms, look no further than our list of the top slang for refuse. Get ready to be entertained and educated on the lesser-known side of waste management!

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1. Trash

Trash refers to any waste material that is no longer wanted or needed. It can include items such as food scraps, packaging, or unwanted items.

  • For example, “Throw that empty can in the trash.”
  • A person might say, “I need to take out the trash before it starts to smell.”
  • In a discussion about recycling, someone might mention, “We should try to reduce the amount of trash we produce.”

2. Rubbish

Rubbish is another term for garbage or waste material. It is commonly used in British English.

  • For instance, “Put that old newspaper in the rubbish bin.”
  • A person might say, “The streets are littered with rubbish.”
  • In a conversation about cleaning, someone might ask, “Can you help me take out the rubbish?”

3. Junk

Junk refers to items that are considered to be of little value or usefulness. It can include things like old furniture, broken appliances, or random clutter.

  • For example, “I need to clean out my garage and get rid of all this junk.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want any more junk cluttering up my house.”
  • In a discussion about organizing, someone might suggest, “Let’s sort through our junk and donate what we don’t need.”

4. Garbage

Garbage is another term for waste material that is no longer wanted. It can include things like food waste, packaging, or other discarded items.

  • For instance, “Don’t forget to take out the garbage before it starts to smell.”
  • A person might say, “The garbage truck comes every Tuesday to collect our trash.”
  • In a conversation about composting, someone might mention, “We should separate our food scraps from the rest of the garbage.”

5. Debris

Debris refers to scattered fragments or remains of something that has been destroyed or discarded. It can include things like broken glass, rubble, or other types of waste material.

  • For example, “There was debris all over the road after the car accident.”
  • A person might say, “We need to clean up the debris from the construction site.”
  • In a discussion about natural disasters, someone might mention, “The storm left a trail of debris in its wake.”

6. Offal

Offal refers to the internal organs and entrails of an animal, usually considered inedible. The term is often used to describe waste or refuse.

  • For example, a chef might say, “I’m going to use every part of the animal, including the offal.”
  • In a discussion about sustainable eating, someone might mention, “Offal is a way to reduce food waste and make use of the entire animal.”
  • A person describing a disgusting scene might say, “There was offal scattered everywhere, it was a horrible sight.”

7. Refuse

Refuse is a general term for any type of waste or garbage that is discarded or thrown away. It can include anything from household trash to industrial waste.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to take out the refuse before it starts to smell.”
  • In a discussion about recycling, someone might mention, “Reducing the amount of refuse we produce is important for the environment.”
  • A person complaining about a messy neighborhood might say, “The streets are filled with refuse, it’s such a shame.”

8. Discards

Discards are items or objects that have been thrown away or rejected as unwanted. The term often refers to things that are no longer useful or valuable.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found some discarded furniture on the side of the road.”
  • In a discussion about consumerism, a person might mention, “We need to find ways to reduce the amount of discards that end up in landfills.”
  • A person describing a messy room might say, “There are discards scattered all over the place, it’s a total mess.”

9. Cast-offs

Cast-offs are items or objects that have been discarded or abandoned as unwanted. The term often implies that the items were once valued or useful, but are no longer wanted.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found some great cast-offs at the thrift store.”
  • In a discussion about sustainable fashion, a person might mention, “Donating cast-offs to charity is a way to reduce waste.”
  • A person complaining about clutter might say, “I need to get rid of all these cast-offs, they’re just taking up space.”

10. Sweepings

Sweepings refer to the dirt, dust, or debris that is collected by sweeping a floor or surface. The term can also be used to describe waste or refuse in a more general sense.

  • For example, a janitor might say, “I need to clean up the sweepings before I can mop the floor.”
  • In a discussion about cleanliness, someone might mention, “Leaving sweepings on the floor can create a tripping hazard.”
  • A person describing a messy workshop might say, “There are sweepings all over the place, it’s a disaster.”

11. Trimmings

This term refers to the scraps or remnants of something that is no longer needed or wanted. It can be used in various contexts, such as food or materials.

  • For instance, after a meal, someone might say, “I’ll save the trimmings for tomorrow’s soup.”
  • In a crafting project, a person might discard the trimmings and say, “These leftover fabric pieces are just trimmings.”
  • A chef might use the trimmings of vegetables to make a stock or broth.
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12. Lumber

In this context, “lumber” refers to unwanted or discarded items that are considered useless or taking up space. It can be used to describe various types of waste or clutter.

  • For example, someone cleaning out their garage might say, “I need to get rid of all this lumber.”
  • A person frustrated with a messy room might exclaim, “This place is filled with nothing but lumber!”
  • A homeowner might hire a junk removal service to clear out the lumber from their property.

13. Claptrap

This term refers to empty or meaningless talk that is considered foolish or insincere. It can be used to describe exaggerated or false statements.

  • For instance, someone might dismiss a politician’s speech as “nothing but claptrap.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might accuse the other of spouting claptrap to deceive them.
  • A critic might write a scathing review, stating, “The movie was filled with clichéd claptrap.”

14. Riffraff

This term refers to a group of people who are considered low-class or undesirable. It can also be used to describe worthless or unwanted objects.

  • For example, someone might say, “I don’t want to associate with that riffraff.”
  • In a discussion about a neighborhood, a person might comment, “There’s too much riffraff around here.”
  • A homeowner might complain about their neighbors, saying, “The yard is always filled with riffraff and garbage.”

15. Flotsam

Flotsam refers to floating wreckage or debris, especially from a shipwreck or other maritime accident. It can also be used metaphorically to describe discarded or unwanted items.

  • For instance, after a storm, someone might say, “The beach was covered in flotsam and jetsam.”
  • In a discussion about environmental pollution, a person might mention the flotsam found in rivers and oceans.
  • A beachgoer might come across flotsam washed ashore and comment, “Look at all this debris!”

16. Jetsam

Jetsam refers to items that have been deliberately thrown overboard from a ship, either to lighten the load or as a form of disposal. It can also refer to any discarded or unwanted items.

  • For example, “The beach was littered with jetsam from the shipwreck.”
  • In a conversation about marine pollution, someone might say, “We need to reduce the amount of jetsam in our oceans.”
  • A person cleaning out their closet might say, “I’m getting rid of all the jetsam I’ve accumulated over the years.”

17. Rejects

Rejects refers to items or people that have been deemed undesirable or unwanted. It can also be used to describe things that have been discarded or rejected.

  • For instance, “The thrift store is full of rejects that people have donated.”
  • In a discussion about job applications, someone might say, “I’ve received nothing but rejects so far.”
  • A person talking about a failed project might say, “The final product was a collection of rejects.”

18. Castaways

Castaways refers to items or people that have been abandoned or left behind. It can also be used to describe things that are isolated or stranded.

  • For example, “The island was littered with the belongings of castaways.”
  • In a conversation about forgotten or neglected items, someone might say, “These castaways deserve a second chance.”
  • A person talking about a deserted building might say, “It’s a haunting place filled with castaways from the past.”

19. Wreckage

Wreckage refers to the remains of something that has been damaged or destroyed. It is often used to describe the aftermath of accidents or disasters.

  • For instance, “The wreckage of the car was scattered across the highway.”
  • In a discussion about a plane crash, someone might say, “The investigators are still searching for clues in the wreckage.”
  • A person talking about a failed relationship might say, “All that’s left is emotional wreckage.”

20. Waste

Waste refers to unwanted or discarded materials that are no longer useful or valuable. It can also refer to actions or behaviors that are considered excessive or unnecessary.

  • For example, “The landfill was overflowing with waste.”
  • In a conversation about recycling, someone might say, “We need to reduce our waste and reuse more.”
  • A person talking about a failed project might say, “It was a waste of time and resources.”

21. Dross

Dross refers to the waste or impurities that are left behind after a process of refining or purification. It can also be used metaphorically to describe something of low value or quality.

  • For example, “The dross from the gold mining process was discarded.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “It’s important to remove the dross to reveal the true beauty of the piece.”
  • A person criticizing a movie might comment, “The film was filled with dross and lacked substance.”

22. Castoffs

Castoffs are items that have been discarded or thrown away. It can refer to clothing, furniture, or any other objects that are no longer wanted or needed.

  • For instance, “The thrift store is full of castoffs waiting to find a new home.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “I love finding unique pieces among the castoffs at vintage stores.”
  • A person discussing sustainability might mention, “One person’s castoffs can be another person’s treasure.”

23. Rummage

To rummage means to search through things in a haphazard or disorderly manner, often in search of something specific or valuable. It can also refer to the act of sorting through and organizing items.

  • For example, “I had to rummage through the attic to find my old yearbooks.”
  • In a discussion about decluttering, someone might say, “I set aside a weekend to rummage through my closet and donate clothes I no longer wear.”
  • A person describing a messy room might comment, “There are piles of papers everywhere, as if someone rummaged through the place.”

24. Residue

Residue refers to the remains or leftover material that is left behind after a process or action. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a lingering effect or consequence.

  • For instance, “There was a sticky residue left on the table after the spilled drink was cleaned up.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, someone might say, “The residue from the spices gave the dish a rich flavor.”
  • A person discussing a past relationship might reflect, “There’s still some emotional residue from that breakup.”

25. Offscourings

Offscourings is a term used to describe waste or refuse, particularly in a derogatory or contemptuous manner. It can also refer to people or things that are considered undesirable or of low value.

  • For example, “The dumpster was filled with the offscourings of the construction site.”
  • In a discussion about social hierarchy, someone might say, “The elite often look down upon the offscourings of society.”
  • A person expressing frustration might exclaim, “I’m tired of dealing with the offscourings of this job.”

26. Rejectamenta

Rejectamenta refers to discarded items or waste. It can be used to describe things that have been rejected, thrown away, or considered worthless.

  • For example, “The beach was littered with rejectamenta washed up from the ocean.”
  • In a discussion about recycling, someone might say, “We need to find ways to reduce the amount of rejectamenta that ends up in landfills.”
  • A person frustrated with clutter might exclaim, “I can’t stand all this rejectamenta cluttering up my house!”

27. Scum

Scum is a derogatory term used to describe filthy or worthless individuals. It can be used to refer to people who are considered low or despicable.

  • For instance, “That scam artist is nothing but scum.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might insult another person by saying, “You’re just scum, always taking advantage of others.”
  • A person expressing disdain for a group might say, “Those criminals are the scum of society.”

28. Trumpery

Trumpery refers to nonsense or worthless things. It can be used to describe something that is considered to have no value or importance.

  • For example, “Don’t waste your time on such trumpery.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might criticize a piece by saying, “It’s just trumpery, lacking any real meaning or skill.”
  • A person expressing frustration might exclaim, “I’m tired of dealing with all this trumpery!”

29. Balderdash

Balderdash is a term used to describe nonsense or foolish talk. It can be used to dismiss something as untrue or ridiculous.

  • For instance, “Don’t listen to him, it’s all balderdash.”
  • In a conversation about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “That’s just balderdash, there’s no evidence to support those claims.”
  • A person expressing disbelief might exclaim, “That’s absolute balderdash, I can’t believe anyone would fall for that!”

30. Guff

Guff is a term used to describe rubbish or nonsense. It can be used to dismiss something as untrue or unimportant.

  • For example, “I don’t have time for your guff.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “All that politician spouts is guff, they never follow through on their promises.”
  • A person expressing annoyance might exclaim, “Enough with the guff, just tell me the truth!”

31. Poppycock

This word is used to describe something that is absurd or untrue. It is often used to express disbelief or to dismiss an idea or statement as ridiculous.

  • For example, if someone makes an outrageous claim, you might respond, “That’s just poppycock!”
  • In a heated argument, one person might accuse the other of talking poppycock.
  • A person might use this word to express their frustration with a misleading advertisement, saying, “The claims made in this commercial are pure poppycock!”

32. Twaddle

Twaddle is a term used to describe foolish or silly talk. It is often used to dismiss someone’s opinion or statement as meaningless or trivial.

  • For instance, if someone is rambling on about something unimportant, you might say, “Stop talking twaddle!”
  • In a debate, one person might accuse the other of spouting twaddle.
  • A person might use this word to express their annoyance with someone who is talking nonsense, saying, “I can’t stand listening to his twaddle anymore!”

33. Baloney

Baloney is a slang term used to describe something that is ridiculous or untrue. It is often used to express disbelief or to mock someone’s statement or claim.

  • For example, if someone tells a far-fetched story, you might respond, “That’s a load of baloney!”
  • In a conversation about conspiracy theories, one person might dismiss them as baloney.
  • A person might use this word to express their skepticism towards a questionable statement, saying, “I don’t believe a word of this baloney!”

34. Hogwash

Hogwash is a term used to describe something that is nonsense or meaningless. It is often used to express disbelief or to dismiss an idea or statement as foolish.

  • For instance, if someone makes a ridiculous claim, you might say, “That’s just hogwash!”
  • In a debate, one person might accuse the other of talking hogwash.
  • A person might use this word to express their frustration with a misleading argument, saying, “I can’t believe people are falling for this hogwash!”

35. Bunk

Bunk is a slang term used to describe something that is nonsense or untrue. It is often used to express disbelief or to dismiss an idea or statement as ridiculous.

  • For example, if someone presents a ridiculous theory, you might respond, “That’s a bunch of bunk!”
  • In a conversation about urban legends, one person might debunk a popular myth as bunk.
  • A person might use this word to express their skepticism towards a dubious claim, saying, “I’m not buying into this bunk!”

36. Drivel

Drivel is a term used to describe meaningless or foolish talk or writing. It refers to content that lacks substance or coherence.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t stand listening to his drivel. It’s just a bunch of empty words.”
  • In a discussion about a poorly written article, one might comment, “The author’s drivel was evident throughout the entire piece.”
  • A person might dismiss someone’s argument by saying, “Don’t listen to his drivel. He doesn’t know what he’s talking about.”

37. Gibberish

Gibberish refers to speech or writing that is difficult or impossible to understand. It often consists of nonsensical or unintelligible words or phrases.

  • For instance, if someone is speaking in a language you don’t understand, you might say, “It all sounds like gibberish to me.”
  • In a discussion about a poorly written document, one might comment, “The report is full of gibberish. I can’t make sense of it.”
  • A person might mimic someone’s unintelligible speech by saying, “Blah blah blah, gibberish gibberish.”

38. Hooey

Hooey is a term used to describe something that is considered nonsense or rubbish. It refers to statements or information that are false or lack credibility.

  • For example, if someone is making outrageous claims, you might say, “Don’t believe his hooey. It’s all made up.”
  • In a discussion about a conspiracy theory, one might comment, “That’s just a bunch of hooey. There’s no evidence to support it.”
  • A person might dismiss someone’s excuses by saying, “Stop with the hooey. You’re just trying to avoid taking responsibility.”

39. Malarkey

Malarkey is a term used to describe nonsense or foolishness. It refers to statements or actions that are considered ridiculous or lacking in truth.

  • For instance, if someone is telling a far-fetched story, you might say, “That’s a load of malarkey. It never happened.”
  • In a discussion about a politician’s promises, one might comment, “Don’t fall for his malarkey. He’s just trying to win votes.”
  • A person might express disbelief by saying, “You expect me to believe that? That’s malarkey!”

40. Piffle

Piffle is a term used to describe trivial or foolish talk. It refers to content that is considered unimportant or lacking in substance.

  • For example, if someone is rambling about insignificant details, you might say, “I don’t have time for this piffle. Get to the point.”
  • In a discussion about a pointless argument, one might comment, “They’re just engaging in piffle. It’s not worth our time.”
  • A person might dismiss someone’s complaints by saying, “Stop with the piffle. There are more important things to worry about.”

41. Tomfoolery

Tomfoolery refers to playful or mischievous behavior that is seen as silly or foolish. It is often used to describe actions that are considered light-hearted and not serious.

  • For example, “Stop all this tomfoolery and get back to work!”
  • In a discussion about pranks, someone might say, “I love a good bit of tomfoolery.”
  • A parent might scold their child, saying, “No more tomfoolery, young lady!”

42. Scrap

Scrap refers to small pieces of discarded or unwanted material. It can be used to describe various types of waste or refuse, such as metal scraps or leftover materials.

  • For instance, “I’m going to collect all the scrap metal and recycle it.”
  • In a conversation about recycling, someone might ask, “Do you have any scrap paper I can use?”
  • A person cleaning out their garage might say, “I need to get rid of all this scrap.”

43. Leftovers

Leftovers refer to the remaining food or materials after a meal or activity. It is commonly used to describe food that is saved for later consumption, but can also refer to any unused or leftover items.

  • For example, “I’m going to eat the leftovers for lunch.”
  • In a discussion about cooking, someone might share a recipe for using leftovers, saying, “Leftover chicken can be transformed into a delicious stir-fry.”
  • A person cleaning their closet might say, “I need to sort through all these leftovers and donate what I don’t need.”

44. Odds and ends

Odds and ends refer to miscellaneous or small items that do not have a specific category or purpose. It is often used to describe a collection of various things that are not easily categorized.

  • For instance, “I have a box of odds and ends in my garage.”
  • In a conversation about organizing, someone might say, “I need to sort through all these odds and ends and find a place for them.”
  • A person cleaning their desk might comment, “I have a few odds and ends here that I need to organize.”