Top 53 Slang For Reinforce – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to solidifying a point or making a statement more impactful, having the right slang for reinforce can make all the difference. Whether you’re looking to amp up your argument or simply add some flair to your language, our team has got you covered. Get ready to level up your communication game with our curated list of trendy phrases and words that will help you strengthen your message in style!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Amp up

To “amp up” means to increase or intensify something, often to make it stronger or more powerful. This slang term is commonly used to describe the act of reinforcing or strengthening something.

  • For example, “I need to amp up my workout routine if I want to see results.”
  • In a conversation about studying, someone might say, “I need to amp up my studying if I want to pass the exam.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We need to amp up our defense in the second half of the game.”

2. Boost

To “boost” means to elevate or improve something, often by adding extra support or strength. This slang term is frequently used to describe the action of reinforcing or enhancing something.

  • For instance, “I need a cup of coffee to boost my energy.”
  • In a discussion about morale, someone might say, “Positive feedback can really boost employee motivation.”
  • A person talking about their immune system might say, “I take vitamin C to boost my immune system.”

3. Fortify

To “fortify” means to strengthen or secure something, often by adding additional protection or support. This slang term is commonly used to describe the act of reinforcing or making something stronger.

  • For example, “I need to fortify my house against potential break-ins.”
  • In a conversation about building structures, someone might say, “We need to fortify the foundation to withstand earthquakes.”
  • A person discussing their diet might say, “I eat foods rich in vitamins to fortify my immune system.”

4. Beef up

To “beef up” means to increase in size or strength, often by adding more substance or power. This slang term is frequently used to describe the action of reinforcing or making something stronger.

  • For instance, “I need to beef up my muscles if I want to compete in the bodybuilding competition.”
  • In a discussion about security measures, someone might say, “We need to beef up our cybersecurity to protect against hackers.”
  • A trainer might tell their client, “You need to beef up your training regimen if you want to see progress.”

5. Bolster

To “bolster” means to support or strengthen something, often by providing additional assistance or reinforcement. This slang term is commonly used to describe the act of reinforcing or making something stronger.

  • For example, “I bought a new pillow to bolster my neck support while sleeping.”
  • In a conversation about confidence, someone might say, “Positive affirmations can bolster your self-esteem.”
  • A person discussing their argument might say, “I presented strong evidence to bolster my case.”

6. Enhance

To improve or increase the quality, value, or effectiveness of something. “Enhance” is often used to describe making something better than it was before.

  • For example, “I used a filter to enhance the colors in this photo.”
  • A person might say, “I need to enhance my resume to stand out from other job applicants.”
  • Another might suggest, “To enhance your studying, try using flashcards.”

7. Strengthen

To make something stronger or more resilient. “Strengthen” implies increasing the power, durability, or effectiveness of something.

  • For instance, “Regular exercise can strengthen your muscles.”
  • A person might say, “I need to strengthen my argument with more evidence.”
  • Another might suggest, “To strengthen your relationship, try spending more quality time together.”

8. Toughen up

To make someone or something more resilient or resistant to hardship or difficulty. “Toughen up” often implies becoming emotionally or mentally stronger.

  • For example, “You need to toughen up if you want to succeed in this competitive industry.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to toughen up my skin by gradually exposing it to the sun.”
  • Another might suggest, “To toughen up your immune system, try eating more fruits and vegetables.”

9. Back up

To provide assistance, reinforcement, or validation to someone or something. “Back up” often implies standing behind or defending someone or something.

  • For instance, “I’ll back you up if you need help with that project.”
  • A person might say, “Can you back up your claims with evidence?”
  • Another might suggest, “To back up your computer files, use an external hard drive.”

10. Shore up

To strengthen or reinforce something in order to make it more stable or secure. “Shore up” often implies providing support or protection against potential weaknesses or vulnerabilities.

  • For example, “We need to shore up the foundation of this building to prevent it from collapsing.”
  • A person might say, “The government is taking measures to shore up the economy during this crisis.”
  • Another might suggest, “To shore up your finances, create a budget and stick to it.”

11. Cement

To cement something means to make it stronger, more stable, or more secure. It is often used metaphorically to describe the act of reinforcing an idea or concept.

  • For example, “Let’s cement our friendship by going on a road trip together.”
  • In a discussion about team unity, one might say, “Team building exercises can help cement the bonds between teammates.”
  • A person advocating for a particular policy might argue, “We need to cement our commitment to environmental sustainability.”

12. Secure

To secure something means to make it safe, stable, or protected. When used in the context of reinforcement, it implies making something stronger or more resistant to outside forces.

  • For instance, “We need to secure the perimeter to prevent any unauthorized access.”
  • In a conversation about cybersecurity, one might say, “A strong password can help secure your online accounts.”
  • A person discussing personal boundaries might assert, “It’s important to set and secure your boundaries in any relationship.”

13. Reinvigorate

To reinvigorate something means to give it new life, energy, or strength. In the context of reinforcement, it suggests renewing or revitalizing something that has weakened or become less effective.

  • For example, “Let’s reinvigorate our marketing strategy to attract more customers.”
  • In a discussion about motivation, one might say, “Setting new goals can reinvigorate your passion for your work.”
  • A person advocating for educational reforms might argue, “We need to reinvigorate our school system to better prepare students for the future.”

14. Rein

To rein something means to control, guide, or direct it. In the context of reinforcement, it implies exerting control or influence to make something stronger or more effective.

  • For instance, “We need to rein in our spending to avoid going into debt.”
  • In a conversation about leadership, one might say, “A good leader knows when to rein in their team and when to let them explore new ideas.”
  • A person discussing self-discipline might assert, “Learning to rein in your impulses is key to achieving your goals.”

15. Stiffen

To stiffen something means to make it firmer, more rigid, or more resistant to bending or breaking. In the context of reinforcement, it suggests making something stronger or more resilient.

  • For example, “The new regulations will stiffen penalties for environmental violations.”
  • In a discussion about physical fitness, one might say, “Strength training exercises can help stiffen your muscles and improve your overall performance.”
  • A person advocating for stricter laws might argue, “We need to stiffen the penalties for gun-related crimes to reduce violence in our communities.”

16. Prop up

To “prop up” means to provide support or strengthen something. It can be used both literally and figuratively.

  • For example, “She used books to prop up the wobbly table.”
  • In a metaphorical sense, “The government tried to prop up the failing economy with stimulus packages.”
  • Another usage could be, “He needed his friends to prop him up after the breakup.”

17. Step up

To “step up” means to increase one’s effort or action in order to accomplish something or meet a challenge.

  • For instance, “We need to step up our game if we want to win this competition.”
  • In a work context, “The manager told the team to step up their productivity.”
  • Another usage could be, “She stepped up and took on more responsibility when her colleague was out sick.”

18. Brace

To “brace” means to prepare for impact or provide support. It can be used both literally and figuratively.

  • For example, “Brace yourself for the impact of the roller coaster.”
  • In a figurative sense, “He braced himself for the difficult conversation.”
  • Another usage could be, “The building was braced with additional supports to withstand the strong winds.”

19. Boost up

To “boost up” means to increase or uplift something, typically in a positive way.

  • For instance, “The motivational speaker boosted up the audience’s confidence.”
  • In a personal context, “Her friends’ encouragement boosted her up when she was feeling down.”
  • Another usage could be, “The team’s victory boosted up their morale for the rest of the season.”

20. Build up

To “build up” means to strengthen or accumulate something over time.

  • For example, “Regular exercise helps build up muscle strength.”
  • In a financial context, “He built up his savings over several years.”
  • Another usage could be, “The company built up its reputation through consistent customer satisfaction.”

21. Confirm

To validate or affirm the truth or accuracy of something. “Confirm” is often used to indicate agreement or support for a statement or action.

  • For example, “Can you confirm that the meeting is at 2 pm?”
  • In a discussion about a news article, someone might comment, “I can confirm that this information is accurate.”
  • A person might say, “I confirm that I will attend the event.”

22. Substantiate

To provide evidence or proof to support or prove the truth or validity of something. “Substantiate” is often used to emphasize the need for concrete evidence or facts.

  • For instance, in a scientific study, researchers must substantiate their claims with data and experiments.
  • In a debate, someone might say, “Please substantiate your argument with credible sources.”
  • A person might comment, “The witness testimony helped to substantiate the defendant’s alibi.”

23. Bear out

To support or confirm the truth or validity of something. “Bear out” suggests that evidence or experiences align with or support a claim or statement.

  • For example, “The data from the study bears out the hypothesis.”
  • In a discussion about a prediction, someone might say, “The results of the experiment bear out my theory.”
  • A person might comment, “The witness’s testimony bears out the victim’s account of the incident.”

24. Corroborate

To confirm or support the truth or accuracy of something by providing additional evidence or testimony. “Corroborate” emphasizes the idea of multiple sources or pieces of evidence supporting a claim.

  • For instance, in a criminal investigation, detectives seek to corroborate witness statements with physical evidence.
  • In a discussion about a historical event, someone might say, “There are multiple accounts that corroborate this version of the story.”
  • A person might comment, “The DNA evidence corroborates the suspect’s presence at the crime scene.”

25. Uphold

To maintain or defend a belief, idea, or principle. “Uphold” suggests actively standing behind or promoting a particular position or viewpoint.

  • For example, “I will uphold the values of honesty and integrity.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I will uphold the rights of the marginalized.”
  • A person might comment, “We must uphold the rule of law in our society.”

26. Reaffirm

To reaffirm means to confirm or assert something again. It is often used to emphasize or strengthen a previous statement or belief.

  • For example, a person might say, “I want to reaffirm my commitment to this project.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s reaffirm our goals for this quarter.”
  • A leader might reaffirm their support for a team member by saying, “I have full confidence in your abilities.”

27. Validate

To validate means to confirm or prove the value or legitimacy of something. It is often used to express approval or support for an idea or action.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Your hard work and dedication validate your success.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “The data from this study validates our hypothesis.”
  • A parent might validate their child’s feelings by saying, “I understand why you’re upset, and your feelings are valid.”

28. Endorse

To endorse means to publicly support or promote something or someone. It is often used in reference to products, services, or political candidates.

  • For example, a celebrity might endorse a brand by saying, “I love using this product, and I highly endorse it.”
  • In politics, a politician might endorse a fellow candidate by saying, “I fully endorse their campaign and believe in their abilities.”
  • A customer might endorse a restaurant by leaving a positive review and saying, “I highly endorse this place for their delicious food and excellent service.”

29. Ratify

To ratify means to formally approve or confirm something, usually through a legal or official process. It is often used in reference to agreements, contracts, or treaties.

  • For instance, a government might ratify a treaty by signing and approving it.
  • In a business setting, a board of directors might ratify a decision by voting and giving their formal approval.
  • A group might ratify a constitution by collectively agreeing and adopting it as their governing document.
See also  Top 0 Slang For Unambiguous – Meaning & Usage

30. Approve

To approve means to give permission or consent to something. It is often used to indicate acceptance or agreement with a proposal or request.

  • For example, a supervisor might approve a vacation request by saying, “I approve your time off for next week.”
  • In a school setting, a teacher might approve a student’s project idea by saying, “I approve of your topic choice and look forward to seeing your work.”
  • A manager might approve a budget proposal by signing and giving their formal approval.

31. Verify

To confirm or establish the truth, accuracy, or validity of something.

  • For example, “Please verify your email address before creating an account.”
  • A user might comment, “Can someone verify if this information is correct?”
  • In a discussion about a news article, someone might say, “I verified the facts before sharing the story.”

32. Authenticate

To confirm or establish the authenticity or validity of something.

  • For instance, “You need to authenticate your identity before accessing the account.”
  • A user might ask, “Can you authenticate the source of this information?”
  • In a discussion about a historical artifact, someone might say, “Experts were able to authenticate the painting as an original.”

33. Justify

To provide a valid reason or explanation that supports or defends a decision, action, or belief.

  • For example, “He tried to justify his behavior by blaming others.”
  • A user might comment, “Can you justify why this product is worth the price?”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I can justify my stance with these statistics.”

34. Prove

To provide evidence or show with certainty that something is true or valid.

  • For instance, “She wanted to prove her theory through experimentation.”
  • A user might ask, “Can you prove that this statement is accurate?”
  • In a discussion about a scientific discovery, someone might say, “The researchers were able to prove their hypothesis with conclusive results.”

35. Certify

To officially confirm or declare that something is true, accurate, or meets certain standards.

  • For example, “He needed to certify his qualifications before getting the job.”
  • A user might comment, “Can you certify that this product is safe to use?”
  • In a discussion about a restaurant’s quality, someone might say, “The Michelin star certification attests to the restaurant’s excellence.”

36. Affirm

To affirm means to back up or support a statement or belief. It is often used to reinforce a point or confirm something that has been said.

  • For example, “I can affirm that the information is accurate.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “I affirm the importance of education.”
  • A person might use this word to emphasize their agreement by saying, “I affirm your decision to pursue your dreams.”

37. Reassert

To reassert means to assert or state something again with confidence. It is used to reinforce a previously made statement or belief.

  • For instance, “He reasserted his authority by reminding everyone of the rules.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “Allow me to reassert my position on this matter.”
  • A person might use this word to emphasize their determination by saying, “I will reassert my rights and fight for justice.”

38. Reiterate

To reiterate means to repeat something that has already been said or stated. It is used to emphasize or reinforce a point.

  • For example, “Let me reiterate the importance of punctuality.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “I want to reiterate the main points discussed.”
  • A person might use this word to emphasize their request by saying, “I would like to reiterate my previous statement.”

39. Emphasize

To emphasize means to give special importance or attention to something. It is used to reinforce the significance or impact of a particular point.

  • For instance, “She emphasized the need for teamwork in the project.”
  • In a presentation, someone might say, “I want to emphasize the key findings of our research.”
  • A person might use this word to stress the importance by saying, “I cannot emphasize enough the importance of regular exercise.”

40. Accentuate

To accentuate means to highlight or make something more noticeable. It is used to reinforce or draw attention to a specific aspect or feature.

  • For example, “The lighting in the room accentuated the artwork on the walls.”
  • In a fashion show, someone might say, “The dress is designed to accentuate the waistline.”
  • A person might use this word to emphasize the impact by saying, “The bold colors accentuate the vibrant energy of the painting.”

41. Intensify

To make something stronger or more intense. “Intensify” is often used to describe the act of increasing the strength or power of something.

  • For example, “The coach told the team to intensify their efforts in the second half.”
  • In a discussion about a political campaign, someone might say, “The candidate needs to intensify their messaging to win over more voters.”
  • A person describing their workout routine might say, “I’ve been intensifying my workouts to build more muscle.”

42. Heighten

To increase the intensity, magnitude, or importance of something. “Heighten” is often used to describe the act of making a situation more intense or significant.

  • For instance, “The suspenseful music heightened the tension in the movie scene.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “The recent events have heightened the need for action.”
  • A person discussing their emotions might say, “The stress of the situation has heightened my anxiety.”

43. Magnify

To make something appear larger, more important, or more significant than it actually is. “Magnify” is often used to describe the act of exaggerating or emphasizing something.

  • For example, “The media tends to magnify small issues into major controversies.”
  • In a discussion about a mistake, someone might say, “Don’t magnify the situation; it’s not as bad as it seems.”
  • A person describing a rumor might say, “The gossip mill has magnified the story into something completely false.”

44. Toughen

To make something stronger, more resilient, or more resistant. “Toughen” is often used to describe the act of increasing durability or endurance.

  • For instance, “The coach put the team through intense training to toughen them up for the upcoming game.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might say, “Challenges and setbacks can toughen you and make you stronger.”
  • A person discussing their immune system might say, “Regular exercise and a healthy diet can help toughen your body’s defenses.”

45. Ampify

To increase the power, volume, or intensity of something. “Ampify” is often used to describe the act of making something louder, stronger, or more energetic.

  • For example, “The DJ amped up the crowd with an energetic remix.”
  • In a discussion about a performance, someone might say, “The singer needs to ampify their stage presence to captivate the audience.”
  • A person describing their excitement might say, “The upcoming event is amping me up; I can’t wait to experience it.”

46. Steel

To steel something means to strengthen or fortify it, often in a metaphorical sense. It can refer to mentally preparing oneself or reinforcing one’s resolve.

  • For example, a coach might say, “We need to steel ourselves for the tough match ahead.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage an audience by saying, “Steel your mind and overcome any obstacles.”
  • In a discussion about perseverance, someone might say, “It’s important to steel yourself against adversity.”

47. Gird

To gird means to prepare or strengthen oneself for a particular situation or challenge. It can also mean to surround or encircle something.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to gird myself for the upcoming job interview.”
  • In a discussion about disaster preparedness, a person might say, “We must gird our communities against natural disasters.”
  • A writer might use the phrase, “Gird your loins,” to suggest preparing for a difficult or challenging task.
See also  Top 60 Slang For More – Meaning & Usage

48. Reenforce

Reenforce is a variant spelling of reinforce, which means to strengthen or support something. It can refer to physical structures or metaphorical concepts.

  • For example, a construction worker might say, “We need to reenforce the foundation of this building.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “We should reenforce our bond through open communication.”
  • A teacher might encourage a struggling student by saying, “Let’s reenforce the concepts you’re having trouble with.”

49. Bulk up

To bulk up means to increase muscle mass or gain weight in a muscular way. It is often used in the context of bodybuilding or fitness.

  • For instance, a personal trainer might say, “If you want to bulk up, you need to focus on weightlifting.”
  • In a discussion about nutrition, someone might say, “Eating enough protein is essential to bulk up.”
  • A fitness enthusiast might share their progress by saying, “I’ve been bulking up for the past few months and have seen significant gains.”

50. Stabilize

To stabilize means to make something stable or secure. It can refer to physical objects or abstract concepts.

  • For example, an engineer might say, “We need to stabilize the structure to prevent it from collapsing.”
  • In a discussion about the economy, someone might say, “The government’s goal is to stabilize inflation.”
  • A therapist might work with a patient to stabilize their mental health by developing coping mechanisms.

51. Harden

To make something stronger or more resistant to damage or failure. “Harden” can be used metaphorically to describe reinforcing a concept or belief.

  • For example, a coach might say, “We need to harden our defense for the upcoming game.”
  • In a discussion about mental resilience, someone might advise, “You need to harden your mindset and not let setbacks discourage you.”
  • A person talking about reinforcing a relationship might say, “We went through a tough time, but it only served to harden our bond.”

52. Underpin

To provide a strong foundation or support for something. “Underpin” is often used in the context of reinforcing ideas or arguments.

  • For instance, a scientist might say, “The theory of evolution is underpinned by extensive research and evidence.”
  • In a debate, someone might state, “The data underpins my argument that climate change is real.”
  • A teacher might explain, “Understanding basic math concepts underpins a student’s ability to solve complex problems.”

53. Shore

To support or reinforce something, especially in a time of need or vulnerability. “Shore” can also be used metaphorically to describe reinforcing relationships or building trust.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’m here to shore you up during this difficult time.”
  • In a business context, someone might state, “We need to shore up our financial resources to weather the economic downturn.”
  • A therapist might advise, “You need to shore up your communication skills to strengthen your marriage.”