Top 67 Slang For Replace – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying current with the latest language trends, knowing the slang for replace can give you an edge in communication. Whether you’re looking to spice up your conversations or simply want to be in the know, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we unveil a list of trendy replacements that will take your vocabulary to the next level. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to level up your linguistic game!

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1. Sub

To replace something or someone with an alternative. “Sub” is often used as a short form of “substitute” in casual conversations.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I need someone to sub for me in class tomorrow.”
  • In a sports game, a player might be substituted out and another player would “sub” in.
  • A person discussing food preferences might say, “I subbed the meat for tofu in this recipe.”

2. Swap out

To replace one thing or person with another. “Swap out” is commonly used when referring to a direct exchange.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m going to swap out my old phone for the latest model.”
  • When rearranging furniture, someone might say, “Let’s swap out the couch and the armchair.”
  • In a fashion context, a person might suggest, “You should swap out those sneakers for a more formal pair.”

3. Switch up

To make a change or replace something with a different option. “Switch up” is often used when referring to a change in routine or preference.

  • For example, someone might say, “I like to switch up my breakfast options every week.”
  • In a fitness context, a person might say, “I switch up my workout routine to keep things interesting.”
  • When discussing hairstyles, someone might say, “I’m thinking of switching up my look with a new haircut.”

4. Trade in

To replace or exchange something for another item, often with the help of a trade-in program or service.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m going to trade in my old car for a newer model.”
  • In the world of gaming, someone might trade in their old video game console for the latest version.
  • A person discussing technology might say, “It’s a good idea to trade in your old phone for a discount on a new one.”

5. Fill in

To replace someone or something temporarily. “Fill in” is often used when referring to a temporary replacement.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “Can you fill in for me while I’m on vacation?”
  • In a band, a musician might fill in for another member who is unable to perform.
  • A person discussing a work schedule might say, “I’ll fill in for you during your lunch break.”

6. Stand in

To take someone’s place temporarily or as a replacement. “Stand in” is often used in the context of performing a specific role or function for someone else.

  • For example, if an actor is unable to attend a rehearsal, another actor might stand in for them.
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “Can you stand in for me at the meeting? I have a conflicting appointment.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you stand in for the class monitor while they’re absent?”

7. Take over

To assume control or responsibility for something that was previously handled by someone else. “Take over” is often used in the context of a transition or change in leadership.

  • For instance, when a manager resigns, another person might take over their duties.
  • In a business context, a company might acquire another company and take over its operations.
  • A team member might say, “I’ll take over the project while you’re on vacation.”

8. Step in

To intervene or take action in a situation, often when someone is unable or unwilling to continue. “Step in” implies taking over a role or responsibility temporarily.

  • For example, if a speaker cancels at a conference, another person might step in and give a presentation.
  • In a family setting, a sibling might step in and help with childcare when parents are busy.
  • A friend might say, “I’ll step in and handle the negotiations for you.”

9. Cover for

To provide assistance or support for someone who is unable to fulfill their duties or responsibilities. “Cover for” implies taking on someone else’s tasks or obligations temporarily.

  • For instance, if a coworker is sick, another coworker might cover for them by completing their assignments.
  • In a sports team, a substitute player might cover for an injured teammate.
  • A person might say, “Can you cover for me during my lunch break?”

10. Back up

To provide support or assistance to someone, often in a challenging or difficult situation. “Back up” implies being there for someone and helping them out.

  • For example, if a friend is in an argument, another friend might back them up by defending their point of view.
  • In a work setting, a coworker might back up their colleague by helping them meet a deadline.
  • A person might say, “I’ll back you up if things get tough.”

11. Pinch hit

To step in or take over for someone or something temporarily. This term is often used in sports to describe a player who replaces another player in a game.

  • For example, in baseball, a coach might say, “We need you to pinch hit for the injured player.”
  • In a discussion about work shifts, someone might say, “I had to pinch hit for my coworker who called in sick.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you pinch hit for me at the party? I have another commitment.”

12. Supplant

To take the place of someone or something by force or by surpassing in importance. This term implies a complete substitution or displacement.

  • For instance, in a business context, a new technology might supplant an older one, making it obsolete.
  • In a conversation about leadership, someone might say, “The new CEO is expected to supplant the current one.”
  • A person discussing evolution might explain, “As species evolve, new traits can supplant old ones.”

13. Succeed

To come after and take the place of someone or something in a position or role. This term implies a smooth transition from one person or thing to another.

  • For example, in politics, a new president succeeds the previous president.
  • In a discussion about inheritance, someone might say, “The eldest son will succeed his father as the head of the family.”
  • A manager might inform their team, “Starting next week, Jane will succeed John as the team leader.”

14. Supersede

To replace someone or something by being superior or more advanced. This term suggests that the new person or thing surpasses the old one in terms of quality or functionality.

  • For instance, a new version of a software program may supersede the previous version, offering improved features.
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “Smartphones have superseded traditional flip phones.”
  • A person discussing fashion trends might note, “The latest style has superseded last year’s trend.”

15. Displace

To take the place of someone or something by force or by causing them to move aside. This term implies a physical or spatial displacement.

  • For example, in a crowded room, you might need to displace a chair to make space for another person.
  • In a discussion about urban development, someone might say, “The new construction project will displace several businesses.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can I displace this book from the shelf to make room for another?”

16. Fill the shoes

This phrase is often used to describe someone stepping into a role or job that was previously held by someone else. It implies that the person is expected to perform as well as or better than their predecessor.

  • For example, “After the retirement of the longtime CEO, it’s time for someone to fill the shoes and lead the company.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The young rookie has big shoes to fill after the departure of the star player.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “I believe in each of you to fill the shoes of our former team member and continue to excel in your roles.”

17. Ring in

This phrase is used to describe the act of introducing or bringing in something new, often in a celebratory or significant manner.

  • For instance, “Let’s ring in the new year with a big party!”
  • A company might announce, “We’re excited to ring in a new era of innovation with our latest product.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m going to ring in my birthday with a special dinner and gathering of loved ones.”

18. Alternate

To alternate means to substitute or switch between two or more options, often in a sequential or regular manner.

  • For example, “I like to alternate between running and swimming for my cardio workouts.”
  • In a work schedule, an employee might have an alternate day off instead of the usual weekend.
  • A person discussing dietary preferences might say, “I alternate between vegetarian and vegan meals depending on the day.”

19. Cover up

To cover up means to conceal or hide something, often to avoid negative consequences or to protect oneself or others from the truth.

  • For instance, “The politician tried to cover up their involvement in the scandal.”
  • A person might say, “I had to cover up my mistake at work to avoid getting in trouble.”
  • In a crime investigation, detectives might uncover a cover-up to reveal the truth.
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20. Change out

To change out means to replace or exchange something, often with a different version or alternative.

  • For example, “I need to change out the old lightbulb for a new one.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to change out of my work clothes and into something more comfortable.”
  • In a home renovation project, someone might decide to change out the outdated kitchen cabinets for modern ones.

21. Sub in

To replace someone or something with another person or thing. This phrase is often used in sports or performing arts.

  • For example, in a basketball game, a coach might say, “Let’s sub in Johnson for Smith.”
  • During a theater production, a director might instruct, “We need to sub in a new actor for this scene.”
  • In a conversation about work, someone might say, “I’ll have to sub in for my colleague while they’re on vacation.”

22. Step into

To assume control or responsibility for someone or something. This phrase is often used when replacing someone in a position or role.

  • For instance, if a manager goes on leave, a colleague might have to step into their role temporarily.
  • In a sports team, a substitute player might step into the game when another player gets injured.
  • A teacher might ask a student to step into the role of class representative while the elected representative is absent.

23. Rotate in

To alternate or switch positions or roles with others. This phrase is often used in team-based activities or jobs.

  • For example, in a soccer game, players might rotate in and out of the field to ensure everyone gets playing time.
  • In a meeting, team members might rotate in presenting their ideas or updates.
  • A manager might rotate in employees to different shifts or tasks to provide variety and development opportunities.

24. Cover over

To place or use something to conceal or replace something else. This phrase is often used when hiding or replacing something undesirable or unwanted.

  • For instance, someone might cover over a stain on a table with a tablecloth.
  • In a painting, an artist might cover over a mistake with a new layer of paint.
  • A person might cover over their emotions with a smile to hide their true feelings.

25. Switch out

To exchange or replace something with another thing. This phrase is often used when changing or replacing objects or components.

  • For example, in a car repair, a mechanic might switch out a faulty part with a new one.
  • A person might switch out their winter wardrobe for their summer clothes as the seasons change.
  • In a home renovation, someone might switch out old light fixtures for new ones.

26. Serve as

This phrase means to act as a substitute or replacement for someone or something.

  • For example, “Can you serve as my backup while I’m on vacation?”
  • In a work setting, someone might say, “I’ll serve as the team lead until they find a permanent replacement.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you serve as the class representative for today’s meeting?”

27. Act for

To act as a substitute or replacement for someone, usually in a performance or professional setting.

  • For instance, “I’ll act for the lead actor in tonight’s show.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Can you act for me in the meeting while I’m out of the office?”
  • A musician might ask another, “Can you act for me on the drums during this song?”

28. Be a stand-in

This phrase means to temporarily take someone’s place or fulfill their role.

  • For example, “Can you be a stand-in for the main model in this photoshoot?”
  • In a film production, someone might say, “We need a stand-in for the actor while they’re getting their makeup done.”
  • A student might volunteer, “I can be a stand-in for the presenter if they can’t make it.”

29. Be a fill-in

To be a temporary replacement or substitute for someone or something.

  • For instance, “I’ll be a fill-in for the receptionist who called in sick.”
  • In a sports team, someone might say, “We need a fill-in for the injured player.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you be a fill-in for the class monitor today?”

30. Be a backup

To be available as a substitute or support in case the original person or plan fails or is unavailable.

  • For example, “I’ll be your backup in case you can’t make it to the meeting.”
  • In a band, someone might say, “We need a backup guitarist for our upcoming tour.”
  • A coworker might offer, “I can be your backup if you need help with that project.”

31. Be a pinch hitter

This phrase comes from baseball, where a pinch hitter is a player who substitutes for another player in the batting order. It is often used to describe someone who steps in to do someone else’s job or fulfill their responsibilities for a short period of time.

  • For example, “I have a meeting, can you be a pinch hitter and cover for me?”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you be a pinch hitter and handle this project while I’m on vacation?”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We need someone to be a pinch hitter and score some points in the final minutes of the game.”

32. Be a relief

This phrase is commonly used to describe stepping in to help or take over for someone, usually to provide a break or assistance in a particular situation.

  • For instance, “Can you be a relief and cover my shift tomorrow?”
  • In a caregiving scenario, someone might say, “I need to take a break, can you be a relief and watch over my loved one for a while?”
  • In a team setting, a member might ask, “Can you be a relief and handle this task while I focus on another project?”

33. Be a surrogate

This term is often used to describe someone who takes on the role or responsibilities of another person, especially in a formal or legal context.

  • For example, “She agreed to be a surrogate and carry the baby for her sister.”
  • In a political setting, a candidate might say, “I’m unable to attend the event, but my campaign manager will be a surrogate and represent me.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “I’ll be a surrogate and attend the meeting on behalf of my colleague who is unable to make it.”

34. Be a proxy

This term is often used to describe someone who acts as a representative or substitute for another person, especially in a formal or official capacity.

  • For instance, “He appointed his lawyer to be a proxy and vote on his behalf.”
  • In a corporate setting, a shareholder might say, “I can’t attend the meeting, but I’ll authorize someone to be a proxy and vote on my behalf.”
  • In a legal context, a person might say, “I’ll be a proxy and sign the documents on behalf of my client.”

35. Be a deputy

This term is often used to describe someone who acts as a substitute or assistant to a person in a position of authority, such as a sheriff or manager.

  • For example, “He was appointed as a deputy and will oversee the department in the absence of the sheriff.”
  • In a law enforcement context, a police officer might say, “I’ll be a deputy and handle traffic duties while my partner investigates the accident.”
  • In a workplace setting, a supervisor might say, “Can you be a deputy and handle any urgent matters while I’m in a meeting?”

36. Be a successor

To become the new person in a position or role, often with the implication of replacing someone else. “Be a successor” means to step into someone’s shoes and continue their work or responsibilities.

  • For example, “After the CEO retired, John was chosen to be his successor.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The Vice President is next in line to be the successor to the President.”
  • A manager might discuss succession planning by saying, “We need to identify potential successors for key leadership positions.”

37. Be a supplanter

To forcefully take the place of someone or something, often with the intention of surpassing or outdoing them. “Be a supplanter” implies a sense of competition or challenge in replacing someone or something.

  • For instance, “The new smartphone model aims to be a supplanter of its competitors.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The rookie player is looking to be a supplanter of the team’s star player.”
  • A business might try to be a supplanter in the market by offering a superior product or service.
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38. Be a displacer

To take the place or position of someone or something, often by pushing them out or moving them aside. “Be a displacer” refers to the act of replacing someone or something by asserting oneself.

  • For example, “The new restaurant aims to be a displacer of the existing local eateries.”
  • In a job context, one might say, “The promotion will allow me to be a displacer of my current colleague.”
  • A company might introduce a new product to be a displacer in the market by offering a more innovative solution.

39. Be a superseder

To overthrow or replace someone or something, often with the intention of taking their place or asserting dominance. “Be a superseder” implies a sense of superiority or authority in replacing someone or something.

  • For instance, “The new political party aims to be a superseder of the current ruling party.”
  • In a technological context, one might say, “The new software will be a superseder of the outdated system.”
  • A leader might strive to be a superseder in their field by constantly innovating and staying ahead of the competition.

40. Upgrade

To improve or replace something with a newer or better version. “Upgrade” refers to the act of replacing or enhancing an existing item or system to make it more advanced or efficient.

  • For example, “I’m going to upgrade my phone to the latest model.”
  • In a technology context, one might say, “The company released a software upgrade to fix bugs and add new features.”
  • A homeowner might decide to upgrade their kitchen appliances to more modern and energy-efficient ones.

41. Trade out

To exchange one thing for another, often to upgrade or change something.

  • For example, “I’m going to trade out my old phone for the latest model.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Let’s trade out the starting pitcher in the next inning.”
  • A person redecorating their home might decide to “trade out” their old furniture for new pieces.

42. Renew

To restore or make something new again.

  • For instance, “I need to renew my driver’s license before it expires.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to renew my gym membership for another year.”
  • In a relationship context, a couple might decide to renew their vows to celebrate a milestone anniversary.

43. Refresh

To update or improve something to make it feel new or fresh again.

  • For example, “I need to refresh my wardrobe with some new clothes.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to refresh my memory by reviewing my notes before the exam.”
  • In a technology context, someone might need to refresh their web browser to load a new page.

44. Revamp

To completely redesign or renovate something to improve its appearance or functionality.

  • For instance, “The company decided to revamp its website to attract more customers.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to revamp my diet and start eating healthier.”
  • In a fashion context, someone might revamp their wardrobe by getting rid of old clothes and buying new ones.

45. Overhaul

To completely change or renovate something, often by replacing many parts or making significant improvements.

  • For example, “The mechanic recommended an overhaul of the engine to fix the issues.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to overhaul my study routine to improve my grades.”
  • In a business context, a company might undergo a major overhaul to restructure its operations and increase efficiency.

46. Interchange

This term refers to the act of exchanging one thing for another. It implies a mutual or reciprocal replacement.

  • For example, “Let’s interchange our seats so we can have a different view.”
  • In a conversation about cars, someone might say, “I need to interchange my tires before winter.”
  • A person discussing job roles might suggest, “We should interchange our responsibilities to gain a fresh perspective.”

47. Update

To update means to make something more modern or current. It involves replacing or improving certain aspects of a system or object.

  • For instance, “I need to update my phone’s software to the latest version.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “It’s essential to regularly update your antivirus software.”
  • A person talking about home renovations might mention, “We decided to update our kitchen by replacing the old appliances.”

48. Renewal

Renewal refers to the act of restoring or replacing something to its original or better condition. It often involves making improvements or changes.

  • For example, “I’m going to renew my gym membership to get back into shape.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “We’re going on a vacation to renew our bond.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might suggest, “Taking a break can help renew your energy and motivation.”

49. Rejuvenate

To rejuvenate means to make something or someone feel young, fresh, or energetic again. It involves replacing or replenishing what has been depleted.

  • For instance, “A good night’s sleep can rejuvenate your body and mind.”
  • In a discussion about skincare, someone might say, “This face mask will rejuvenate your skin and reduce signs of aging.”
  • A person talking about a vacation might mention, “Spending time in nature can rejuvenate your spirit and boost your mood.”

50. Replenish

Replenish means to replace or fill something that has been used up or emptied. It involves restoring or adding back what has been depleted.

  • For example, “I need to replenish my water bottle before going on a hike.”
  • In a conversation about groceries, someone might say, “We need to replenish our pantry with essential items.”
  • A person discussing energy levels might suggest, “Eating a nutritious meal can replenish your energy and keep you focused.”

51. Reinstate

To reinstate means to restore or bring back something that was previously removed or taken away.

  • For example, “The company decided to reinstate the employee after realizing the mistake.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “If elected, I will work to reinstate the policies that have been dismantled.”
  • A sports team might reinstate a player who was previously suspended, saying, “We believe in giving second chances and have decided to reinstate him to the team.”

52. Substitution

Substitution refers to the act of replacing one thing with another, especially as a replacement for something that is no longer available or suitable.

  • For instance, “I made a substitution in the recipe and used almond milk instead of regular milk.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might make a substitution and replace one player with another, saying, “We need fresh legs on the field.”
  • A teacher might ask a student to make a substitution in a sentence, saying, “Can you substitute the word ‘happy’ with a synonym?”

53. Rotate

To rotate means to move or turn something in a circular motion or to alternate between different options or positions.

  • For example, “You need to rotate the tires on your car to ensure even wear.”
  • In a work schedule, employees might rotate shifts, taking turns working different hours.
  • A parent might rotate toys, saying, “Let’s rotate the toys in the playroom so they don’t get bored.”

54. Reallocate

Reallocate means to distribute or assign something, such as resources or responsibilities, in a different or more efficient way.

  • For instance, “The company decided to reallocate funds from marketing to research and development.”
  • In a school project, a group might reallocate tasks to different members, saying, “Let’s reallocate the workload so everyone has a fair share.”
  • A manager might reallocate staff to different departments, saying, “We need to reallocate resources to meet the demands of the project.”

55. Reconstruct

To reconstruct means to build or create something again, often after it has been damaged or destroyed.

  • For example, “The architect plans to reconstruct the historic building using original blueprints.”
  • In a crime investigation, forensic experts might reconstruct the scene to gather evidence.
  • A person might decide to reconstruct their life after a major setback, saying, “I’m going to take this opportunity to reconstruct my career and start fresh.”

56. Recycle

To replace something with a similar item or to exchange something for a different version. The term “recycle” is often used to describe the act of replacing something old or worn out with something new.

  • For example, “I’m going to recycle my old phone for a newer model.”
  • In a discussion about sustainable fashion, someone might say, “I try to recycle my clothes by donating them or trading them with friends.”
  • A person discussing home renovation might mention, “We decided to recycle our old kitchen cabinets and replace them with new ones.”

57. Reimburse

To compensate someone for an expense or loss, usually by giving them money. “Reimburse” is a term used to describe the act of replacing someone’s funds or covering their costs.

  • For instance, “The company will reimburse you for any work-related expenses.”
  • A person discussing a canceled flight might say, “The airline promised to reimburse me for the cost of the ticket.”
  • In a conversation about splitting bills, someone might ask, “Can you reimburse me for your share of the dinner?”

58. Ditch

To abandon or leave behind something or someone. “Ditch” is often used as a slang term to describe the act of replacing or getting rid of something or someone.

  • For example, “I’m going to ditch this old car and buy a new one.”
  • In a discussion about unhealthy habits, someone might say, “I decided to ditch smoking and start exercising instead.”
  • A person discussing a toxic friendship might mention, “I had to ditch that friend because they were always bringing me down.”

59. Trade up

To exchange something for a better or more desirable version. “Trade up” is a slang term used to describe the act of replacing something with a higher-quality or more valuable item.

  • For instance, “I’m going to trade up my old phone for the latest model.”
  • A person discussing their car might say, “I think it’s time to trade up to a newer, more reliable vehicle.”
  • In a conversation about home appliances, someone might mention, “We decided to trade up our old refrigerator for a more energy-efficient one.”

60. Makeover

To give something or someone a new and improved appearance or style. “Makeover” is a term used to describe the act of replacing or updating the look of something or someone.

  • For example, “I’m going to give my bedroom a makeover and replace the old furniture.”
  • In a discussion about personal style, someone might say, “I’m considering a makeover to update my wardrobe.”
  • A person discussing a home renovation might mention, “We’re planning a complete makeover of our outdated kitchen.”

61. Reinvent

To completely change or transform something, often with the intention of making it better or more modern.

  • For example, “The company decided to reinvent their image by rebranding and redesigning their logo.”
  • A fashion designer might say, “I want to reinvent the classic little black dress and give it a modern twist.”
  • A technology company might announce, “We are going to reinvent the smartphone with our latest innovation.”

62. Restyle

To alter the appearance or design of something, typically to give it a new and updated look.

  • For instance, “She decided to restyle her living room by repainting the walls and replacing the furniture.”
  • A hairstylist might say, “I can restyle your hair by giving you a new haircut and adding some layers.”
  • A fashion blogger might write, “I love to restyle old clothes by adding accessories and mixing different pieces together.”

63. Reimagine

To envision or think about something in a fresh and innovative manner, often with the intention of creating new possibilities or ideas.

  • For example, “The artist decided to reimagine famous paintings by incorporating modern elements.”
  • A writer might say, “I want to reimagine the traditional fairy tale and give it a contemporary twist.”
  • An architect might present a project and say, “We aim to reimagine urban spaces by incorporating sustainable designs and green areas.”

64. Reconfigure

To rearrange or alter the way something is arranged or organized, often with the goal of improving its functionality or efficiency.

  • For instance, “The IT department had to reconfigure the network to accommodate the new software.”
  • A homeowner might say, “I want to reconfigure the layout of my kitchen to create more counter space.”
  • A company might announce, “We are going to reconfigure our production process to increase productivity and reduce costs.”

65. Swap

To trade or exchange one thing for another, often with the intention of getting something different or better.

  • For example, “They decided to swap their old car for a newer model.”
  • A student might say, “Let’s swap textbooks for the semester so we don’t have to buy new ones.”
  • A collector might suggest, “I have this rare coin, would you like to swap it for one of yours?”

66. Modify

To make changes or alterations to something. “Modify” is a term that often implies making small adjustments or refinements to an existing object or system.

  • For example, a software developer might say, “I need to modify the code to fix this bug.”
  • In a discussion about car modifications, someone might mention, “I modified my exhaust system to improve performance.”
  • A person giving feedback on a document might suggest, “You should modify the wording to make it more clear.”

67. Reassign

To move someone or something to a different position or location. “Reassign” is a term often used in the context of work or responsibilities.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “I need to reassign this project to another team member.”
  • In a discussion about job rotations, someone might mention, “I was reassigned to a different department for a few months.”
  • A teacher might inform a student, “I’m going to reassign this homework to be due next week.”