Top 60 Slang For Sending – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slang for sending, the language of communication is constantly evolving. Whether you’re sliding into DMs or firing off a quick text, staying up-to-date with the latest lingo is essential. Lucky for you, our team has put together a curated list of the trendiest phrases and expressions for sending messages in style. Get ready to level up your communication game and impress your friends with these fresh new terms!

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1. Shoot over

This phrase is used to ask someone to send something to you, whether it be a file, a message, or any other form of communication.

  • For example, “Hey, can you shoot over that document to me?”
  • Someone might say, “Shoot over the pictures from last night’s party.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you shoot over the presentation slides?”

2. Pass along

This slang term is used to request that someone forward or share something with you, typically in the context of information or a message.

  • For instance, “Can you pass along that email to me?”
  • A coworker might say, “Pass along any updates from the meeting.”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “Can you pass along the details of the event?”

3. Ship it

This phrase is used to express the desire for someone to send or deliver an item or information.

  • For example, “I need that package ASAP. Can you ship it to me?”
  • A friend might say, “I forgot my charger. Can you ship it to my house?”
  • In a business context, someone might ask, “Can you ship the documents to the client?”

4. Throw it my way

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to send something to you, typically in the context of sharing information or a file.

  • For instance, “If you find any interesting articles, throw them my way.”
  • A colleague might say, “Throw that spreadsheet my way when you’re done.”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “Can you throw the meeting agenda my way?”

5. Hit me up

This slang term is used to ask someone to contact or reach out to you, typically in the context of communication or making plans.

  • For example, “If you’re free this weekend, hit me up and we can hang out.”
  • A friend might say, “I heard about a job opening. Hit me up if you’re interested.”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “I need advice, hit me up when you have a moment.”

6. Slide into my DMs

This phrase is used to invite someone to send a private message on social media, particularly on platforms like Instagram or Twitter. It implies a flirtatious or romantic intention.

  • For example, someone might comment on a post saying, “You’re so cute, slide into my DMs!”
  • A person might tweet, “Looking for someone to slide into my DMs and make me laugh.”
  • In a conversation about online dating, a user might say, “I’ve had a few people slide into my DMs, but most of them turn out to be creeps.”

7. Beam it over

This phrase is used to express the action of sending something, usually a file or document, electronically or through a digital platform.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “Can you beam over that presentation? I need to review it.”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Can you beam over the notes from yesterday’s lecture?”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might mention, “With modern communication tools, you can beam over files instantly.”

8. Dispatch it

This phrase is used to indicate the act of sending something promptly or without delay.

  • For example, a boss might say to an employee, “We need to get this report to the client ASAP, so dispatch it immediately.”
  • A person might instruct a delivery driver, “Make sure you dispatch the package as soon as possible.”
  • In a conversation about online orders, someone might say, “I can’t wait to receive my new shoes. I hope they dispatch it soon.”

9. Zip it over

This phrase is used to convey the action of sending something swiftly or expeditiously, often referring to electronic transmission.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Can you zip over that funny video you mentioned?”
  • A coworker might ask, “Could you zip over the updated spreadsheet before the meeting?”
  • In a discussion about sharing files, someone might say, “With cloud storage, you can zip files over to anyone with just a few clicks.”

10. Air-mail it

This phrase is used to suggest sending something, typically a message or document, through email.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “Can you air-mail me the meeting agenda?”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Can you air-mail me the lecture notes from yesterday?”
  • In a conversation about digital communication, someone might mention, “Back in the day, people would have to air-mail physical letters to communicate internationally.”

11. Courier it

This phrase is used to mean sending something quickly or expeditiously. It implies a sense of urgency and efficiency in getting something from one place to another.

  • For example, if someone asks for a document to be delivered urgently, they might say, “Can you courier it to me?”
  • In a conversation about sending a package, someone might say, “I’ll courier it to you so it arrives tomorrow.”
  • Another usage could be, “I need to courier this package to the office before the end of the day.”

12. Express it

To “express it” means to send something quickly or with speed. It implies a sense of urgency and the need for prompt delivery.

  • For instance, if someone wants to send a letter urgently, they might say, “I need to express it so it arrives tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation about shipping a package, someone might say, “Let’s express it to ensure it reaches its destination on time.”
  • Another usage could be, “If you want it to arrive quickly, you should express it.”

13. Hurl it

This phrase is used metaphorically to mean sending something forcefully or with great intensity. It implies a strong and powerful action of sending.

  • For example, if someone wants to send a message with a lot of emotion, they might say, “I’m going to hurl it at them.”
  • In a discussion about expressing anger, someone might say, “When I’m mad, I tend to hurl my words.”
  • Another usage could be, “I’m going to hurl this complaint at the customer service department.”

14. Relay it

To “relay it” means to pass something along or send it to someone else. It implies the act of transferring information or an object from one person to another.

  • For instance, if someone wants to share a message with a colleague, they might say, “Can you relay it to Sarah?”
  • In a conversation about passing on a request, someone might say, “I’ll relay it to the appropriate department.”
  • Another usage could be, “Please relay this information to the rest of the team.”

15. Route it

To “route it” means to send something through a specific path or channel. It implies the act of directing the flow of something to a particular destination.

  • For example, if someone wants to send a document through a specific department, they might say, “Please route it through HR.”
  • In a conversation about sending a package, someone might say, “Let’s route it through a courier service for faster delivery.”
  • Another usage could be, “We need to route this email to the appropriate team for handling.”

16. Transmit it

This phrase is used to indicate sending something, usually electronically, to someone else. It can refer to sharing information, files, or messages.

  • For example, “I’ll transmit the document to you via email.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “Transmitting data over a secure network is essential.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you transmit the message to the team?”

17. Convey it

To convey something means to communicate or express it to someone else. It can refer to sharing information, ideas, or messages.

  • For instance, “Please convey my regards to your family.”
  • In a discussion about effective communication, someone might say, “The ability to convey your thoughts clearly is crucial.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you convey the message to the rest of the team?”

18. Deliver it

To deliver something means to bring or send it to a specific person or place. It can refer to physically transporting an item or sending it electronically.

  • For example, “I’ll deliver the package to your office tomorrow.”
  • In a conversation about online shopping, someone might say, “The company promises to deliver the order within two days.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you deliver the message to the recipient?”

19. Forward it

To forward something means to send it to someone else, often by email or other digital means. It can refer to sharing information, messages, or files.

  • For instance, “Please forward the email to the rest of the team.”
  • In a discussion about spreading awareness, someone might say, “If you find this article helpful, feel free to forward it to others.”
  • A person might ask, “Could you forward the document to me?”

20. Post it

To post something means to share it online, usually on social media or a discussion forum. It can refer to sharing information, photos, videos, or thoughts.

  • For example, “I’ll post the picture on Instagram.”
  • In a conversation about online engagement, someone might say, “Posting regularly helps to build a following.”
  • A person might ask, “Did you see what she posted on Facebook?”

21. Shuttle it

This phrase is used to indicate the act of sending something quickly or efficiently. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, if someone asks you to send an email, you might respond with, “Sure, I’ll shuttle it over to you right away.”
  • In a conversation about sharing files, one person might say, “Just shuttle the document to me, and I’ll take a look.”
  • A friend might ask you to send them a funny video and say, “Shuttle it to me so I can watch it later.”

22. Transfer it

This phrase is used to indicate the act of moving something from one place to another. It can refer to both physical and digital transfers.

  • For instance, if someone asks you to send them a file, you might say, “I’ll transfer it to you via email.”
  • In a conversation about moving data between devices, one person might say, “Just transfer the photos to your computer using a USB cable.”
  • A colleague might ask you to send them a document and say, “Please transfer it to me before the deadline.”

23. Dispatch

This term is often used to describe the act of sending something off or getting it on its way promptly.

  • For example, if someone asks you to send a package, you might say, “I’ll dispatch it through the postal service.”
  • In a discussion about logistics, one person might say, “The delivery company will dispatch the package as soon as possible.”
  • A supervisor might instruct an employee to send an urgent email and say, “Please dispatch the message to the client immediately.”

24. Relay

This word is used to indicate the act of passing something along to someone else, often in a sequential or organized manner.

  • For instance, if someone asks you to send a message to another person, you might say, “I’ll relay it to them for you.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, one person might say, “We need to relay information effectively to ensure everyone is on the same page.”
  • A teacher might ask a student to share information with the class and say, “Please relay the details of your research project to the rest of the students.”

25. Air-mail

This term is used to indicate the act of sending something through the air, typically through a postal or delivery service.

  • For example, if someone asks you to send them a letter, you might say, “I’ll air-mail it to you for faster delivery.”
  • In a discussion about international shipping, one person might say, “Air-mail is often the quickest way to send packages overseas.”
  • A friend might ask you to send them a souvenir from your travels and say, “Can you air-mail it to me so I can receive it sooner?”

26. Beam it

This slang term is used to refer to sending something, usually a message or information, quickly or instantly. It implies a sense of speed and efficiency in the sending process.

  • For example, “I’ll beam you the file right away.”
  • In a discussion about communication methods, someone might say, “Instead of emailing, you can just beam it to me.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you beam me the details of the meeting?”

27. Courier

To “courier” something means to deliver or transport it, often with a sense of urgency or importance. It can refer to physically delivering a package or transporting information or messages.

  • For instance, “I need to courier these documents to the client.”
  • In a conversation about logistics, someone might say, “We can use a courier service to get the package there quickly.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you courier the package to my office?”

28. Deliver

To “deliver” something means to send or bring it to a recipient. It can refer to physically delivering a package or sending information or messages.

  • For example, “I’ll deliver the report to your desk.”
  • In a discussion about online shopping, someone might say, “They offer fast delivery on all orders.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you deliver the message to him?”

29. Express

To “express” something means to send it with speed or urgency. It implies a sense of quickness and efficiency in the sending process.

  • For instance, “I need to express this package to its destination.”
  • In a conversation about shipping options, someone might say, “You can choose express delivery for faster shipping.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you express the letter to the recipient?”

30. Forward

To “forward” something means to send it on or redirect it to another recipient. It can refer to forwarding a message or email, or redirecting a physical package.

  • For example, “I’ll forward the email to the team.”
  • In a discussion about mail services, someone might say, “You can forward your mail to a different address.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you forward the package to a different location?”

31. Post

To post something means to share or send it, usually on a social media platform or online forum. It can also refer to sending something in the mail.

  • For example, “I’m going to post a picture of my vacation on Instagram.”
  • A user might comment, “I saw your post on Facebook and it made me laugh.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you remember to post the letter?”

32. Route

To route something means to send or direct it to a specific destination. It can refer to sending physical items or directing information or data.

  • For instance, “The package will be routed through the postal service.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll route the email to the appropriate department.”
  • In a conversation about shipping, someone might ask, “How do they route packages to different countries?”

33. Shoot the breeze

To shoot the breeze means to have a casual conversation or chat with someone. It often refers to friendly or lighthearted conversation.

  • For example, “We sat on the porch and shot the breeze for hours.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s grab a coffee and shoot the breeze.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might suggest, “We should get together and shoot the breeze sometime.”

34. Toss it

To toss it means to send or get rid of something, often in a casual or nonchalant manner.

  • For instance, “I don’t need this anymore, so I’ll just toss it.”
  • A person might say, “If you’re done with that magazine, can I toss it?”
  • In a decluttering conversation, someone might suggest, “If you haven’t used it in a year, toss it.”

35. Transmit

To transmit something means to send or transfer it, often electronically or through a communication channel.

  • For example, “The radio tower transmits signals to receivers.”
  • A person might say, “Please transmit the document to the rest of the team.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might ask, “How does the device transmit data?”

36. Pass it on

This phrase is used to encourage someone to share or forward something to others. It implies the act of passing along information or an item to someone else.

  • For example, if someone receives an interesting article, they might say, “Pass it on to the rest of the team.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “I found a great recipe, pass it on to everyone.”
  • If a friend has a funny video to share, they might say, “Pass it on to all our friends.”

37. Ship it out

This phrase is used to indicate the action of sending or distributing something. It implies the act of packaging something up and sending it off to its intended destination.

  • For instance, if someone is mailing a package, they might say, “I need to ship it out today.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We received the order, now we just need to ship it out.”
  • If a friend is returning borrowed items, they might say, “I’ll ship it out to you tomorrow.”

38. Throw it down

This phrase is used to encourage someone to take action or make a move. It implies the act of boldly and confidently engaging in a task or activity.

  • For example, if someone is hesitant to dance at a party, their friends might say, “Just throw it down and show off your moves.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Don’t hold back, throw it down and give it your all.”
  • If someone is nervous about giving a presentation, a colleague might say, “You’ve prepared, now it’s time to throw it down and impress the audience.”

39. Zip it up

This phrase is used to indicate the action of closing or sealing something. It implies the act of fastening or securing an item, often with a zipper.

  • For instance, if someone is packing a suitcase, they might say, “I need to zip it up before we leave.”
  • In a conversation about food storage, someone might say, “Make sure to zip it up tightly to keep the freshness.”
  • If someone is closing a bag, they might say, “Zip it up so nothing falls out.”

40. Hurl it out

This phrase is used to indicate the action of throwing or getting rid of something. It implies the act of forcefully and quickly disposing of an item.

  • For example, if someone is decluttering their home, they might say, “I need to hurl it out to make more space.”
  • In a discussion about cleaning, someone might say, “Don’t just move the clutter around, hurl it out.”
  • If someone wants to discard an old item, they might say, “It’s time to hurl it out and make room for something new.”

41. Air-drop

To air-drop something means to send it electronically, usually via a wireless connection. The term originated from the feature on Apple devices that allows users to quickly transfer files between devices using Bluetooth or Wi-Fi.

  • For example, “Can you air-drop me that document?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll air-drop you the photos from our trip.”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “Could you air-drop the playlist to everyone?”

42. Beam it up

To beam something up means to send it quickly, as if by teleportation. The phrase originates from the television show “Star Trek,” where characters would be transported from one location to another by a beam of light.

  • For instance, “Can you beam up the report to my email?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll beam up the files to the cloud.”
  • In a conversation about sharing photos, someone might suggest, “Just beam them up to the shared album.”

43. Toss it over

To toss something over means to send it casually or informally. The phrase implies a lack of formality or urgency in the sending process.

  • For example, “Can you toss over the keys when you’re done?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll toss over the document for you to review.”
  • In a conversation about sharing a video, someone might suggest, “Just toss it over on a USB drive.”

44. Hurl it down

To hurl something down means to send it forcefully or with great speed. The phrase conveys a sense of urgency or intensity in the sending process.

  • For instance, “Can you hurl down the package to me?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll hurl down the message to the team.”
  • In a discussion about sharing information, someone might suggest, “Let’s hurl down the updates to everyone.”

45. Pass it along

To pass something along means to send it to the next person or recipient in a chain of communication or distribution. The phrase implies a collaborative or sequential sending process.

  • For example, “Can you pass along the message to the rest of the team?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll pass the document along to the next department.”
  • In a conversation about sharing a book, someone might suggest, “Just pass it along to the next person on the list.”

46. Ship it off

This phrase is used to express the act of sending something away or delivering it to its destination. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.

  • For example, “I finished my project, now it’s time to ship it off to the client.”
  • In a conversation about returning a package, someone might say, “I need to ship it off to the post office tomorrow.”
  • In a more figurative sense, someone might say, “I’ve done all I can, now it’s time to ship off my worries and move on.”

47. Throw it over

This phrase is used to indicate the act of passing something to someone else, either physically or metaphorically. It implies transferring responsibility or sharing information.

  • For instance, in a game of catch, someone might say, “Throw it over!” to pass the ball to their teammate.
  • In a conversation about sharing a task, someone might say, “I can’t handle this, can you throw it over to someone else?”
  • In a discussion about sharing news or gossip, someone might say, “I heard an interesting rumor, let me throw it over to you.”

48. Zip it down

This phrase is used to convey the idea of sending something swiftly or expeditiously. It implies a sense of urgency or efficiency in the act of sending.

  • For example, in a conversation about sending an email, someone might say, “I’ll zip it down to you right away.”
  • In a discussion about delivering a message, someone might say, “If you need to reach me urgently, zip it down to my phone.”
  • In a context where time is of the essence, someone might say, “We’re running late, let’s zip it down and get there as fast as possible.”

49. Dispatch it out

This phrase is used to express the act of sending something out or distributing it to its intended recipients. It implies a sense of efficiency and promptness in the act of sending.

  • For instance, in a conversation about mailing packages, someone might say, “I need to dispatch it out before the post office closes.”
  • In a discussion about sending out invitations, someone might say, “Once we finalize the guest list, we can dispatch them out.”
  • In a context where time is limited, someone might say, “We have a tight deadline, let’s dispatch it out as soon as possible.”

50. Relay it over

This phrase is used to indicate the act of passing something from one person to another, often involving the transmission of information or a message. It implies the act of relaying or transferring something.

  • For example, in a game of telephone, someone might say, “Relay it over to the next person, but remember the original message.”
  • In a conversation about sharing news or updates, someone might say, “Can you relay it over to the rest of the team?”
  • In a context where information needs to be shared, someone might say, “I’ll relay it over to the relevant department for further action.”

51. Convey

To convey means to send or communicate something to someone. It can refer to sending information, a message, or an object.

  • For example, “Please convey my regards to your family.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “I will convey your feedback to the team.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you convey the main idea of the story in your own words?”

52. Transfer

To transfer means to move or send something or someone from one place to another. It can refer to physically moving objects or electronically moving data.

  • For instance, “I need to transfer money from my savings account to my checking account.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “The player requested a transfer to a different team.”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Can you transfer the files to my USB drive?”

53. Ship out

To ship out means to send or dispatch something or someone, often by mail or by a shipping service. It can refer to sending packages, goods, or even people.

  • For example, “I need to ship out these orders by the end of the day.”
  • In a military context, someone might say, “He was shipped out to a different base for his next assignment.”
  • A manager might instruct an employee, “Please ship out these documents to our branch office.”

54. Beam up

To beam up means to send or transport something or someone, often in a futuristic or science fiction context. The term originated from the television show “Star Trek,” where characters would be transported from one location to another using a teleportation device called a transporter.

  • For instance, “Beam me up, Scotty!” became a famous catchphrase from the show.
  • In a playful context, someone might say, “I wish I could beam myself to the beach right now.”
  • A science fiction fan might ask, “If you could beam up anywhere in the world, where would you go?”

55. Pass on

To pass on means to forward or send something to someone else. It can refer to passing along information, a message, or an opportunity.

  • For example, “Please pass on this message to the rest of the team.”
  • In a social context, someone might say, “I’ll pass on the invitation to the party.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you pass on the email attachment to me?”

56. Drop off

To deliver or leave something at a particular location.

  • For example, “I’ll drop off the package at your house tomorrow.”
  • A friend might say, “Can you drop off my keys at the office for me?”
  • In a business context, someone might ask, “Can you drop off the documents at the client’s office?”

57. Hand off

To pass something to someone else.

  • For instance, “I’ll hand off the baton to you during the relay race.”
  • In a team sport, a player might say, “Hand off the ball to me, I’m open!”
  • In a work setting, someone might request, “Can you hand off the report to your colleague for review?”

58. Send out

To distribute or dispatch something to multiple recipients.

  • For example, “I’ll send out the invitations to the party tomorrow.”
  • A company might send out a newsletter to its subscribers.
  • In an email, someone might write, “I’ll send out the meeting agenda to everyone later today.”

59. Shoot out

To forcefully release or discharge something in a rapid manner.

  • For instance, “The sprinkler system will shoot out water when activated.”
  • In a video game, a character might shoot out bullets at enemies.
  • A person might say, “The car’s exhaust pipe shoots out a lot of smoke.”

60. Hurl out

To throw or propel something with force and intensity.

  • For example, “He hurled out insults during the argument.”
  • In a baseball game, a pitcher might hurl out a fastball.
  • A person might say, “I accidentally hurled out my phone when I slipped on the ice.”
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