Top 105 Slang For Small-Amount – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to discussing small amounts, sometimes regular words just won’t cut it. That’s why we’ve put together a list of the top slang terms for small amounts that you need to know. Whether you’re talking about money, food, or anything in between, these slang words will add a little extra flair to your conversations. So, let’s dive in and discover the perfect slang term for that tiny bit that you’re trying to describe!

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1. Diddly-squat

This term is used to describe an extremely small or insignificant amount. It emphasizes the idea of having very little or nothing at all.

  • For example, someone might say, “I searched the entire house and found diddly-squat.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s contribution, one might comment, “They didn’t do diddly-squat to help.”
  • Another person might complain, “I worked all day and got paid diddly-squat for it.”

2. Hoot

This slang term refers to a small or insignificant amount or level of something. It can also be used to describe something that is not important or noteworthy.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I don’t give a hoot about what they think.”
  • In a discussion about a minor issue, someone might comment, “It’s really not worth a hoot.”
  • Another person might say, “I had a hoot of a time at the party last night.”

3. Whit

This slang term is used to describe a very small or minuscule amount of something. It conveys the idea of a tiny bit or quantity.

  • For example, someone might say, “I don’t care a whit about what they think.”
  • In a conversation about a small mistake, one might comment, “It doesn’t matter a whit in the grand scheme of things.”
  • Another person might say, “I only have a whit of information on that topic.”

4. Rap

This slang term refers to a small quantity or portion of something. It can also be used to describe a small amount of time or effort.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’ll just have a rap of that cake.”
  • In a discussion about a small achievement, someone might comment, “It’s not much, but it’s a rap.”
  • Another person might say, “I spent a rap of time trying to fix that issue.”

5. Fig

This term is used to describe a small or insignificant amount of something. It conveys the idea of a small quantity or value.

  • For example, someone might say, “It’s not worth a fig to me.”
  • In a conversation about a minor setback, one might comment, “It’s just a fig in the grand scheme of things.”
  • Another person might say, “I have a fig of interest in that topic.”

6. Squat

Squat is slang for a small or insignificant amount of something. It is often used to describe a lack of quantity or value.

  • For example, “I worked all day and got squat done.”
  • Someone might say, “I found squat in my pockets when I checked for spare change.”
  • In a conversation about rewards, one might comment, “The prize for winning was squat, not even a trophy.”

7. Bupkes

Bupkes is a Yiddish term that means “nothing” or “very little.” It is often used to emphasize the absence or insignificance of something.

  • For instance, “I studied for hours and remembered bupkes for the test.”
  • A person might say, “I asked for a raise, but my boss gave me bupkes.”
  • In a discussion about results, someone might comment, “We put in a lot of effort, but the outcome was bupkes.”

8. Ort

Ort is a term used to describe a small amount of leftover food or a scrap. It is often used in the context of a meal or snack.

  • For example, “I didn’t eat much, just a few orts from yesterday’s dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I hate to waste food, so I always save the orts for later.”
  • In a conversation about portion sizes, someone might comment, “I’ll just have an ort of dessert, I’m trying to watch my calories.”

9. Pinch

Pinch refers to a small amount of something, typically used when there is a shortage or scarcity.

  • For instance, “Can you spare a pinch of sugar? I ran out.”
  • A person might say, “I only have a pinch of cash left, so I can’t afford to buy anything.”
  • In a discussion about ingredients, someone might comment, “Just add a pinch of salt to enhance the flavor.”

10. Smattering

Smattering refers to a small or scattered amount of something, often used to describe a limited or insufficient quantity.

  • For example, “I only have a smattering of knowledge about that subject.”
  • Someone might say, “There was only a smattering of applause after his speech.”
  • In a conversation about language skills, one might comment, “I have a smattering of French, but I’m not fluent.”

11. Whisper

This slang term refers to a very small or insignificant amount of something. It is often used to describe a small quantity of money or an insignificant portion.

  • For example, “He only gave me a whisper of a tip.”
  • In a conversation about a raise, someone might say, “The increase they offered me was just a whisper.”
  • A person complaining about their portion of food might say, “They served me a whisper of mashed potatoes.”

12. Chicken-feed

This term is used to describe a small amount of money or something that is considered insignificant or unimportant. It often implies that the amount is not worth much.

  • For instance, “He paid me chicken-feed for all the work I did.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might say, “I can’t survive on chicken-feed.”
  • A person talking about a low salary might say, “They offered me chicken-feed for the job.”

13. Mite

This slang term refers to a small amount of money or something that is considered insignificant or meager. It is often used to emphasize the smallness or insignificance of the amount.

  • For example, “He only gave me a mite for my birthday.”
  • In a conversation about a payment, someone might say, “I can only afford a mite right now.”
  • A person complaining about a small portion of food might say, “They served me a mite of dessert.”

14. Paltry sum

This term is used to describe a small or meager amount of money or something that is considered insignificant or of little value. It often implies disappointment or dissatisfaction with the amount.

  • For instance, “He offered me a paltry sum for my car.”
  • In a discussion about compensation, someone might say, “I can’t survive on such a paltry sum.”
  • A person talking about a small inheritance might say, “I was left a paltry sum in the will.”

15. Peanuts

This slang term refers to a very small or insignificant amount of something, often money. It is often used to convey the idea that the amount is so small that it is almost worthless.

  • For example, “He paid me peanuts for all the work I did.”
  • In a conversation about a salary, someone might say, “They offered me peanuts for the job.”
  • A person complaining about a small tip might say, “They left me peanuts for the service.”

16. Pittance

A pittance refers to a very small or insignificant amount of money. It is often used to describe a payment or salary that is considered to be inadequate or insufficient.

  • For example, “I worked all week for a pittance.”
  • Someone might complain, “They paid me a pittance for all the work I did.”
  • A person discussing low wages might say, “Many workers in this industry are paid a pittance.”

17. Pocket money

Pocket money refers to a small amount of money that is given to someone, typically a child, on a regular basis. It is often used to teach children about money management and responsibility.

  • For instance, “My parents give me pocket money every week.”
  • A parent might say, “I give my kids pocket money so they can learn how to save and spend wisely.”
  • Someone might ask, “How much pocket money do you get?”

18. Small potatoes

Small potatoes refers to something that is considered to be of little importance or value. It is often used to describe a small amount of money or a task that is not significant.

  • For example, “Don’t worry about it, it’s small potatoes.”
  • A person might say, “I only made small potatoes on that job.”
  • Someone might dismiss a minor expense by saying, “It’s just small potatoes.”

19. Spending money

Spending money refers to the money that is available for someone to spend on personal expenses or discretionary purchases. It is often used to differentiate between money that is allocated for specific purposes, such as bills or savings.

  • For instance, “My parents gave me some spending money for the weekend.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any spending money left?”
  • Someone might plan their budget by setting aside a specific amount for spending money.

20. Band-Aid

Band-Aid is a slang term used to describe a small amount of money that is provided as a temporary solution or quick fix. It is often used in situations where a larger amount of money is needed, but only a small amount is available.

  • For example, “I can only offer a Band-Aid for now, but I’ll try to find a better solution.”
  • A person might say, “I need a Band-Aid to cover this expense until I get paid.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Let’s use a Band-Aid for now and come up with a long-term solution later.”

21. Miniscule amount

This term refers to an extremely small or insignificant amount of something. It is often used to emphasize the smallness of the quantity.

  • For example, “He only gave me a miniscule amount of money for my hard work.”
  • In a discussion about food portions, someone might say, “The restaurant served a miniscule amount of fries.”
  • A person might complain, “I asked for extra cheese, but they only put a miniscule amount on my sandwich.”

22. Not enough

This phrase is used to describe a quantity that is considered inadequate or insufficient for a particular purpose or need.

  • For instance, “I didn’t eat breakfast, so a small salad for lunch was not enough.”
  • In a conversation about studying for an exam, someone might say, “Just reading the textbook once is not enough.”
  • A person might express frustration, “I worked all day, but my paycheck is still not enough to cover my bills.”

23. Small quantity

This term simply refers to a small amount or quantity of something.

  • For example, “The recipe calls for a small quantity of salt.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “I can only afford to spend a small quantity of money on entertainment.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you please give me a small quantity of milk for my coffee?”

24. Speck

This word is used to describe a very small particle or spot. It can also be used metaphorically to refer to a small amount or quantity of something.

  • For instance, “There was a speck of dust on the table.”
  • In a conversation about cleaning, someone might say, “I vacuumed the carpet, but there are still specks of dirt.”
  • A person might comment, “He only ate a speck of food at dinner.”

25. Spit in the sea

This phrase is used to describe an amount that is so small in comparison to the whole that it is practically insignificant or inconsequential.

  • For example, “His contribution to the project was like a spit in the sea.”
  • In a discussion about a large event, someone might say, “Our attendance numbers are just a spit in the sea compared to the overall turnout.”
  • A person might express disappointment, “I studied for hours, but my improvement on the test was just a spit in the sea.”

26. Too little too late

This phrase is used to describe a situation where an action or effort is not enough or is not done in a timely manner.

  • For example, if someone apologizes for a mistake they made but it doesn’t fix the damage, you might say, “That’s too little too late.”
  • In a discussion about a missed opportunity, someone might comment, “I had the chance to invest in that company, but it was too little too late.”
  • If someone tries to make amends after causing a lot of harm, you might say, “Their apology came too little too late.”

27. Trifle

This word is used to describe something that is of little importance or value, often in the context of a small amount.

  • For instance, if someone offers you a small piece of cake, you might say, “I’ll just have a trifle.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I only spend a trifle on coffee each month.”
  • If someone asks for a small favor, you might reply, “Sure, it’s just a trifle.”

28. Trivial amount

This phrase is used to describe a small or insignificant amount of something.

  • For example, if someone owes you a small sum of money, you might say, “It’s just a trivial amount.”
  • In a discussion about expenses, someone might mention, “I only spent a trivial amount on groceries this week.”
  • If someone asks for a small portion of food, you might say, “I’ll give you a trivial amount.”

29. Smidgen

This word is used to describe a very small or tiny amount of something.

  • For instance, if someone asks for a small taste of your dessert, you might say, “Just a smidgen.”
  • In a discussion about ingredients in a recipe, someone might say, “You only need a smidgen of salt.”
  • If someone asks for a small piece of a puzzle, you might reply, “I’ll give you a smidgen.”

30. Atom

This word is used to describe an extremely small particle or amount, often in a scientific or metaphorical context.

  • For example, in a discussion about chemistry, someone might say, “An atom is the smallest unit of matter.”
  • In a metaphorical sense, someone might say, “I don’t have an atom of doubt in my mind.”
  • If someone asks for a small piece of paper, you might say, “Here’s an atom.”

31. Crumb

This term refers to a very small piece or amount of something. It can be used to describe a small portion or fragment.

  • For example, “There’s just a crumb of cake left in the pan.”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might say, “I only had a crumb of the pizza.”
  • A person might complain, “They only gave me a crumb of information about the project.”

32. Dash

In this context, “dash” refers to a small quantity or addition of something. It can be used to describe a small amount of a substance or ingredient.

  • For instance, a recipe might call for “a dash of salt.”
  • In a discussion about cocktails, someone might say, “Add a dash of bitters to enhance the flavor.”
  • A person might ask, “Could you please add a dash of pepper to my soup?”

33. Drop

This term is used to describe a small amount or portion of something. It can refer to a small quantity of liquid or any other substance.

  • For example, “Add a drop of water to the mixture.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, someone might say, “I just need a drop of vanilla extract.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I only have a drop of milk left for my cereal!”

34. Fraction

In this context, “fraction” refers to a small part or portion of something. It can be used to describe a small amount or piece of a whole.

  • For instance, “He only ate a fraction of his dinner.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might say, “I saved a fraction of my paycheck.”
  • A person might complain, “I only received a fraction of the information I needed.”

35. Fragment

This term describes a small piece or part of something. It can refer to a small portion or component that is incomplete or separated from the whole.

  • For example, “She found a fragment of a broken vase.”
  • In a conversation about writing, someone might say, “I’m struggling to find the right words for this fragment of a story.”
  • A person might comment, “I only have fragments of memories from that day.”

36. Grain

This term refers to a very small quantity or amount of something. It is often used to describe an insignificant or minuscule measurement.

  • For example, “Add just a grain of salt to the recipe for extra flavor.”
  • In a discussion about savings, someone might say, “Every grain counts when it comes to building wealth.”
  • A person describing a small portion might say, “I only had a grain of rice for dinner.”

37. Iota

An iota is a very small or insignificant amount of something. It is often used to emphasize the smallness or insignificance of a quantity.

  • For instance, “I don’t have an iota of interest in that topic.”
  • In a conversation about proofreading, someone might say, “Not a single iota of punctuation should be overlooked.”
  • A person describing a small contribution might say, “I can only offer an iota of help.”

38. Wee bit

This phrase is used to describe a small or tiny quantity of something. It is often used in casual conversation to indicate a small measurement.

  • For example, “Could you pour me a wee bit of milk for my coffee?”
  • In a discussion about food portions, someone might say, “I’ll just have a wee bit of dessert.”
  • A person describing a small task might say, “It’ll only take a wee bit of time to finish.”

39. Skosh

Skosh is a slang term used to describe a small or little amount of something. It is often used to indicate a small measurement or quantity.

  • For instance, “Could you pass me a skosh more sugar for my tea?”
  • In a conversation about adding seasoning, someone might say, “Just a skosh of salt will enhance the flavor.”
  • A person describing a small space might say, “There’s only a skosh of room in this car.”

40. Pin money

Pin money refers to a small amount of money that is earned or set aside for personal spending or small expenses. It is often used to describe a small sum of money that is not essential for living expenses.

  • For example, “I use my pin money to treat myself to a coffee or a small indulgence.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “I allocate a portion of my income as pin money.”
  • A person describing a small income might say, “I earn just enough pin money to cover my hobbies.”

41. Drop in the bucket

This phrase is used to describe an amount that is extremely small or insignificant in relation to a larger whole. It implies that the amount is so small that it has little impact or significance.

  • For example, if someone donates $1 to a charity that needs millions of dollars, it would be considered a drop in the bucket.
  • In a conversation about a massive construction project, someone might say, “The additional funding they provided is just a drop in the bucket.”
  • When discussing the global water crisis, someone might mention, “Every little bit helps, but it’s really just a drop in the bucket.”

42. Dab

In slang terms, “dab” can refer to a small amount or quantity of something. It is often used to describe a small portion or a tiny amount of a substance or product.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Just put a dab of hot sauce on your food for some extra flavor.”
  • In a beauty tutorial, a makeup artist might mention, “Use a dab of concealer to cover up any blemishes.”
  • When discussing cooking, someone might say, “Just add a dab of butter to give the dish a rich flavor.”

43. Morsel

A morsel refers to a small piece or amount of something, typically food. It is often used to describe a small bite or portion that is meant to be savored or enjoyed.

  • For example, someone might say, “I couldn’t resist taking a morsel of the delicious cake.”
  • In a restaurant review, a food critic might mention, “The appetizer was so good that I wished there was more than just a morsel.”
  • When discussing dieting, someone might say, “I allow myself a morsel of chocolate as a treat.”

44. Particle

A particle refers to a tiny piece or amount of something. It is often used to describe something that is very small and can be difficult to see or notice.

  • For instance, in a scientific context, a researcher might talk about studying particles at the atomic level.
  • In a discussion about pollution, someone might mention, “Even small particles in the air can have a negative impact on our health.”
  • When discussing cleaning, someone might say, “Make sure to wipe down every particle of dust.”

45. Pocket change

Pocket change refers to a small amount of money. It is often used to describe an insignificant or unimportant amount of money, usually coins that are carried in one’s pocket.

  • For example, if someone offers to pay for a meal and only gives a few dollars, it could be considered pocket change.
  • In a conversation about buying a new car, someone might say, “I can’t afford it with just pocket change.”
  • When discussing fundraising, someone might mention, “Even pocket change can make a difference if enough people contribute.”

46. Tenner

A “tenner” is a slang term for a ten-dollar bill. It is commonly used to refer to a small amount of money.

  • For example, “I only have a tenner left in my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “Can you lend me a tenner until payday?”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I’m trying to save a few tenners each month.”

47. Twenty spot

A “twenty spot” is a slang term for a twenty-dollar bill. It is often used to refer to a small amount of money.

  • For instance, “I found a twenty spot in my jacket pocket.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll pay you back with a twenty spot next week.”
  • In a discussion about inexpensive meals, someone might suggest, “You can get a decent lunch for a twenty spot.”

48. Fifty spot

A “fifty spot” is a slang term for a fifty-dollar bill. It is commonly used to refer to a small amount of money.

  • For example, “I can’t afford that, I only have a fifty spot.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you a fifty spot if you help me move.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, someone might mention, “I try to put aside a few fifty spots each month.”

49. C-note

A “C-note” is a slang term for a hundred-dollar bill. It is often used to refer to a small amount of money.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe I spent a whole C-note on dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll pay you back with a C-note next week.”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, someone might mention, “I saved up a few C-notes to buy a new phone.”

50. Benji

A “Benji” is a slang term for a hundred-dollar bill. It is commonly used to refer to a small amount of money.

  • For example, “I found a Benji in the parking lot.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you a Benji if you can fix my car.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, someone might mention, “I want to save up a few Benjis for a vacation.”

51. Grant

In slang terms, a “grant” refers to one thousand dollars. This term is often used in urban communities or among young people.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a quick grant at the casino.”
  • A person discussing their finances might mention, “I need to save up five grants for a down payment.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me a grant until payday?”

52. Grand

Similar to “grant,” “grand” is slang for one thousand dollars. It is commonly used in casual conversation or among friends.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a grand selling my old car.”
  • A person discussing a large purchase might mention, “I saved up three grands to buy this new laptop.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you spot me a grand? I’ll pay you back next week.”

53. K

The letter “K” is often used as an abbreviation for “kilo,” which means one thousand. In slang, “K” is used to represent one thousand dollars.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made 10K from a freelance gig.”
  • A person discussing their salary might mention, “I’m making 60K a year.”
  • Another might ask, “How much did you spend on that vacation? It must have cost a few Ks.”

54. Stack

In slang terms, a “stack” refers to one thousand dollars. This term is commonly used in hip-hop culture or among individuals who are familiar with urban slang.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a stack from selling sneakers.”
  • A person discussing their savings might mention, “I have five stacks in my emergency fund.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me a stack? I’ll pay you back next month.”

55. G

The letter “G” is often used as an abbreviation for “grand,” which means one thousand dollars. In slang, “G” is used to represent one thousand dollars.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made 5G from a side hustle.”
  • A person discussing their expenses might mention, “I spent 2G on concert tickets.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have any Gs to spare? I need to cover my rent.”

56. Rack

In slang, “rack” is used to refer to a thousand dollars. It is often used to describe a large amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a rack from my side hustle.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one person might ask, “How much did that new car cost you?” to which the other person might respond, “About five racks.”
  • A person bragging about their earnings might say, “I’m making racks on racks on racks.”

57. Band

Similar to “rack,” “band” is also used to refer to a thousand dollars. It is often used to describe a large sum of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a band from my latest business venture.”
  • In a discussion about investments, one person might ask, “How much did you put into that stock?” and the other person might reply, “A couple bands.”
  • A person boasting about their wealth might say, “I’m flexing with bands in my bank account.”

58. Dub

In slang, “dub” is used to refer to twenty dollars. It is often used to describe a small amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have a dub on me, can you spot me for lunch?”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, one person might say, “I’ll give you a dub for my share.”
  • A person talking about their expenses might say, “I spent a dub on coffee this morning.”

59. Deuce

“Deuce” is slang for two dollars. It is often used to describe a small amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found a deuce on the ground while walking.”
  • In a conversation about buying snacks, one person might ask, “Can you lend me a deuce?”
  • A person talking about their budget might say, “I can only afford to spend a deuce on lunch today.”

60. Fin

In slang, “fin” is used to refer to five dollars. It is often used to describe a small amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need a fin to pay for parking.”
  • In a conversation about borrowing money, one person might say, “Can you lend me a fin until payday?”
  • A person talking about their expenses might say, “I spent a fin on this new shirt.”

61. Sawbuck

This term refers to a small amount of money, specifically ten dollars. It is believed to originate from the resemblance of the Roman numeral X (which represents ten) to the legs of a sawbuck, a wooden frame used to hold logs for sawing.

  • For example, “I’ll give you a sawbuck for that old book.”
  • In a conversation about prices, someone might say, “I can sell this for a sawbuck.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a sawbuck until payday?”

62. Single

In the context of small amounts, “single” typically refers to one unit or item. It can be used to describe a single dollar bill or any other single item.

  • For instance, “I only have a single on me, can you break it?”
  • In a discussion about buying snacks, someone might say, “I’ll just grab a single candy bar.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any singles for the vending machine?”

63. Double

When used to describe a small amount, “double” usually means two units or items. It can refer to two dollars or any other pair of items.

  • For example, “I’ll give you a double for that small painting.”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, someone might suggest, “Let’s each pay a double.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a double for me?”

64. Triple

In the context of small amounts, “triple” typically means three units or items. It can refer to three dollars or any other group of three items.

  • For instance, “I’ll give you a triple for those tickets.”
  • In a discussion about buying drinks, someone might say, “I’ll take a triple of that whiskey.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a triple until I get paid?”

65. Quad

When used to describe a small amount, “quad” usually means four units or items. It can refer to four dollars or any other group of four items.

  • For example, “I’ll give you a quad for that vintage vinyl record.”
  • In a conversation about sharing snacks, someone might suggest, “Let’s split it into quads.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have a quad I can borrow?”

66. Fiveroonie

A “fiveroonie” is a slang term for a five-dollar bill. It is often used in casual conversations or when referring to a small amount of money.

  • For example, “I found a fiveroonie in my pocket!”
  • A person might say, “Can you lend me a fiveroonie? I forgot my wallet.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t believe they charged me a fiveroonie for a cup of coffee!”

67. Ten-spot

A “ten-spot” is a slang term for a ten-dollar bill. It is commonly used to refer to a small amount of money or when discussing cash.

  • For instance, “I only have a ten-spot left in my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you a ten-spot for that old book.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you break a ten-spot? I need change for the bus.”

68. Twenny

“Twenny” is a slang term for a twenty-dollar bill. It is often used in informal conversations or when discussing money in a casual manner.

  • For example, “I found a twenny in my jacket pocket!”
  • A person might say, “I’ll pay you back with a twenny next week.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t believe they charged me a twenny for a movie ticket!”

69. Fifty bones

A “fifty bones” is a slang term for a fifty-dollar bill. It is commonly used to refer to a small amount of money or when discussing cash in a casual manner.

  • For instance, “I found fifty bones in the couch cushions!”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you fifty bones for that vintage record.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you break fifty bones? I need change for the parking meter.”

70. Hundo

A “hundo” is a slang term for a one hundred-dollar bill. It is often used to refer to a small amount of money or when discussing cash in an informal manner.

  • For example, “I can’t believe I spent a hundo on dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll pay you back with a hundo next payday.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I found a hundo in my jacket pocket!”

71. Dubby

This term refers to a twenty-dollar bill. It is often used in urban slang to describe a small amount of money.

  • For example, “I only have a dubby left, so let’s split the bill.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I can’t afford that, I’m down to my last dubby.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a dubby? I need to buy a bus ticket.”

72. Deucey

This slang term is used to describe a two-dollar bill. It is a colloquial way of referring to a small amount of money.

  • For instance, “I found a deucey in my pocket, so I bought a candy bar.”
  • In a discussion about tipping, someone might say, “I usually leave a deucey for good service.”
  • A person might joke, “I’m so broke, all I have is a deucey to my name.”

73. Finny

This term refers to a five-dollar bill. It is slang for a small amount of money, typically used in urban settings.

  • For example, “I found a finny on the ground, so I treated myself to a coffee.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might say, “I can only afford to spend a finny on lunch.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a finny? I need to buy some groceries.”

74. Saw

This slang term is used to describe a ten-dollar bill. It is a way of referring to a small amount of money in urban slang.

  • For instance, “I’m short on cash, all I have is a saw in my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about splitting expenses, someone might say, “Can you lend me a saw? I’ll pay you back next week.”
  • A person might joke, “I’m living on a saw and a prayer until payday.”

75. Buck

This term refers to a one-dollar bill. It is a common slang term used to describe a small amount of money.

  • For example, “I found a buck on the ground, so I bought a lottery ticket.”
  • In a conversation about affordability, someone might say, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m down to my last buck.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a buck? I need to catch the bus.”

76. Double sawbuck

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, specifically twenty dollars. It is derived from the fact that a sawbuck is a slang term for a ten-dollar bill, and “double sawbuck” simply means two of them.

  • For example, “I only have a double sawbuck on me, so I can’t afford that expensive meal.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll lend you a double sawbuck if you promise to pay me back.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I try to save at least a double sawbuck every week.”

77. Half a C-note

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, specifically fifty dollars. It is derived from the fact that a “C-note” is a slang term for a one-hundred-dollar bill, and “half a C-note” simply means half of that amount.

  • For instance, “I can only afford to contribute half a C-note to the group gift.”
  • A person might say, “I found half a C-note in my pocket; I forgot I had it.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I try to save at least half a C-note every month.”

78. Half a grand

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, specifically five hundred dollars. It is derived from the fact that “grand” is a slang term for one thousand dollars, and “half a grand” simply means half of that amount.

  • For example, “I need to come up with half a grand by the end of the month to pay my bills.”
  • A person might say, “I spent half a grand on a new phone; it better be worth it.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, someone might mention, “I try to put away at least half a grand every paycheck.”

79. Half a stack

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, specifically five hundred dollars. It is derived from the fact that a “stack” is a slang term for one thousand dollars, and “half a stack” simply means half of that amount.

  • For instance, “I can only afford to lend you half a stack right now; I’m a bit tight on cash.”
  • A person might say, “I found half a stack hidden in my sock drawer; I forgot I had it.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I try to save at least half a stack every month.”

80. Half a band

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, specifically five hundred dollars. It is derived from the fact that a “band” is a slang term for one thousand dollars, and “half a band” simply means half of that amount.

  • For example, “I was able to negotiate the price down to half a band; it’s a good deal.”
  • A person might say, “I spent half a band on concert tickets; it was worth every penny.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, someone might mention, “I try to put away at least half a band every paycheck.”

81. Half a G

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, specifically half of a thousand dollars. The “G” in this case stands for “grand,” which is a colloquial term for one thousand dollars.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have half a G left in my bank account.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one person might ask, “How much did you spend on that vacation?” and the other might reply, “Oh, just half a G.”
  • A person might complain, “I worked all week and only made half a G. It’s not enough to cover my bills.”

82. Half a rack

This slang term is another way to refer to a small amount of money, specifically half of a thousand dollars. The term “rack” is a colloquial term for one thousand dollars.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to save up because I only have half a rack right now.”
  • In a conversation about a recent purchase, one person might ask, “How much did that new phone cost?” and the other might reply, “Just half a rack.”
  • A person might joke, “I spent half a rack on concert tickets. I better enjoy the show!”

83. Half a benji

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, specifically half of a hundred dollars. The term “benji” is a colloquial term for one hundred dollars.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can only afford to give you half a benji as a loan.”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, one person might suggest, “Let’s each pay half. That’s just half a benji.”
  • A person might complain, “I worked overtime all week and only made half a benji. It’s not worth the extra hours.”

84. Half a grant

This slang term is another way to refer to a small amount of money, specifically half of a thousand dollars. The term “grant” is a colloquial term for one thousand dollars.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to save up because I only have half a grant right now.”
  • In a conversation about a recent purchase, one person might ask, “How much did that new TV cost?” and the other might reply, “Just half a grant.”
  • A person might joke, “I spent half a grant on new clothes. I better look like a million bucks!”

85. Half a double sawbuck

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, specifically half of a twenty-dollar bill. The term “double sawbuck” is a colloquial term for a twenty-dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can only lend you half a double sawbuck right now.”
  • In a conversation about buying lunch, one person might suggest, “Let’s split the bill. That’s just half a double sawbuck each.”
  • A person might complain, “I worked all day and only made half a double sawbuck. It’s not enough to cover my expenses.”

86. Half a dub

This slang term refers to a small amount of money, specifically fifty dollars. It is often used in informal or street language.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have half a dub on me, can you spot me the rest?”
  • In a conversation about splitting a bill, one person might say, “I’ll pay half a dub if you cover the rest.”
  • A person discussing their budget might mention, “I can only afford to spend half a dub on groceries this week.”

87. Half a deucey

Similar to “half a dub,” this slang term also refers to fifty dollars. It is commonly used in urban or informal contexts.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I owe you half a deucey for the concert ticket.”
  • In a discussion about a shared expense, someone might suggest, “Let’s each contribute half a deucey to cover the cost.”
  • A person talking about their finances might say, “I can save half a deucey each month towards my goals.”

88. Half a finny

This slang term is another way of referring to fifty dollars. It is often used in informal or street language.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll pay you back half a finny by the end of the week.”
  • In a conversation about the cost of a night out, one person might say, “I only have half a finny to spend.”
  • A person discussing their budget might mention, “I managed to save half a finny from my last paycheck.”

89. Half a saw

Similar to the previous terms, “half a saw” is slang for fifty dollars. It is commonly used in urban or informal contexts.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I can lend you half a saw until payday.”
  • In a discussion about splitting a bill, someone might suggest, “Let’s each contribute half a saw to cover the cost.”
  • A person talking about their finances might say, “I need to save up half a saw for my upcoming trip.”

90. Half a buck

This slang term refers to fifty cents, which is a small amount of money. It is commonly used in informal or street language.

  • For example, someone might say, “Can you lend me half a buck for the vending machine?”
  • In a conversation about the price of a snack, one person might say, “It’s only half a buck, so it’s pretty cheap.”
  • A person discussing their pocket change might mention, “I found half a buck in the couch cushions.”

91. Half a double

This term refers to a small amount of money, specifically 50 dollars. It is often used in informal settings or among friends.

  • For example, “Hey, can you lend me half a double? I need to buy some groceries.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might say, “I only have half a double left for entertainment this month.”
  • A person might joke, “I can’t believe he spent half a double on a cup of coffee!”

92. Twenties

This slang term refers to twenty-dollar bills, which are often used as a small unit of currency. It is commonly used in casual conversations or when discussing financial matters.

  • For instance, “I only have a few twenties left in my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about spending habits, someone might say, “I try to save my twenties for emergencies.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a twenty? I need some change for the bus.”

93. Benjamins

This slang term refers to one-hundred-dollar bills, which are considered a significant amount of money. It is often used in casual conversations or when talking about wealth or large expenses.

  • For example, “He paid for the car in Benjamins.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might say, “I want to save up enough Benjamins to buy a house.”
  • A person might boast, “I make it rain Benjamins at the club!”

94. Stacks

This slang term refers to bundles of cash, typically in one-hundred-dollar bills. It is often used to describe a large amount of money or to imply wealth.

  • For instance, “He walked into the party with stacks of cash.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, someone might say, “I dropped stacks on a new designer handbag.”
  • A person might brag, “I make stacks of money from my side hustle!”

95. Bread

This slang term refers to money in general, regardless of the specific amount. It is commonly used in informal conversations or when discussing financial matters.

  • For example, “I need to make some bread to pay my bills.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, someone might say, “I’m looking for a job that pays good bread.”
  • A person might complain, “I spent all my bread on concert tickets!”

96. Dough

This term is slang for money, particularly in the form of cash. It can also refer to the act of making money.

  • For example, “I need to save up some dough before I can go on vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to start a side hustle to earn some extra dough.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much dough do you have in your savings account?”

97. Loot

Originally used to describe stolen goods, “loot” now refers to money or any valuable items.

  • For instance, “I just got my paycheck, time to splurge on some new loot.”
  • A person might say, “I found some great loot at the flea market yesterday.”
  • In a discussion about video games, someone might ask, “What’s the best way to farm loot in this game?”

98. Scratch

This term is slang for money, specifically in the form of cash. It can also refer to earning money or making a living.

  • For example, “I need some scratch to pay my bills.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been scratching and clawing to make ends meet.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much scratch do you have in your wallet?”

99. Wad

A “wad” refers to a bundle of cash, usually folded or rolled up together. It can also refer to a large amount of money in general.

  • For instance, “He pulled out a wad of cash to pay for the drinks.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been saving up a wad of money for a down payment on a house.”
  • In a discussion about finances, someone might ask, “How much wad do you need to retire comfortably?”

100. Cheddar

This term is slang for money, particularly in the form of cash. It is derived from the fact that the color of American money resembles the color of cheddar cheese.

  • For example, “I need to earn some cheddar to pay my bills.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to hustle and make some cheddar.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much cheddar do you have in your bank account?”

101. Greenbacks

This term refers to U.S. currency, specifically paper money. “Greenbacks” is derived from the color of the ink used on the bills.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to save up some greenbacks for my vacation.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, one might mention, “It’s important to have a stash of greenbacks for emergencies.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any greenbacks I can borrow until payday?”

102. Moola

This slang term is used to refer to cash or money in general. It’s a casual way of talking about funds or financial resources.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to earn some moola to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about a recent purchase, a person might say, “I had to fork over a lot of moola for this new gadget.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me some moola until I get my paycheck?”

103. Simoleons

This term is a playful way of referring to money or currency. It’s often used in a lighthearted or humorous context.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a five-dollar bill on the street. Scored some simoleons!”
  • In a discussion about saving money, a person might say, “I’m trying to accumulate simoleons for a big purchase.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any spare simoleons? I need to buy lunch.”

104. Smackers

This slang term is used to refer to money, particularly in the context of a small amount. It’s a casual way of talking about cash or funds.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I only have a few smackers in my wallet right now.”
  • In a conversation about a low-cost item, a person might say, “I bought this shirt for just a few smackers.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a couple of smackers? I forgot my wallet.”

105. Cheese

This term is used to refer to money, particularly in the context of a small amount. It’s a casual way of talking about cash or funds.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to save up some cheese for my vacation.”
  • In a discussion about a recent purchase, a person might say, “I had to spend a lot of cheese on this new gadget.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any spare cheese I can borrow until payday?”
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