Top 100 Slang For Yes – Meaning & Usage

Looking for some cool and trendy ways to say “yes”? Look no further! We’ve got you covered with our list of the top slang for “yes” that will have you sounding hip and in the know. So, whether you want to impress your friends or just add some flair to your conversations, get ready to dive into this fun and informative article. You won’t want to miss out on these awesome slang words for “yes”!

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1. Yeah

This is a casual and informal way of saying yes. It is commonly used in everyday conversations.

  • For example, when asked if they want to go out for dinner, someone might respond, “Yeah, that sounds good.”
  • In a group discussion, one person might say, “Yeah, I agree with that point.”
  • When confirming plans, a person might say, “Yeah, I’ll be there at 8 pm.”

2. Yup

Yup is a more casual and relaxed way of saying yes. It is often used in informal situations or when speaking with friends or close acquaintances.

  • For instance, when asked if they want another slice of pizza, someone might say, “Yup, I’ll take one more.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, one person might say, “Yup, I’m going hiking on Saturday.”
  • When confirming a meeting time, someone might respond, “Yup, let’s meet at 3 pm.”

3. Yep

Yep is another informal way of saying yes. It is similar in meaning to yeah and is commonly used in casual conversations.

  • For example, when asked if they finished their homework, a student might say, “Yep, I’m all done.”
  • In a discussion about favorite movies, someone might say, “Yep, that’s definitely my top pick.”
  • When confirming an invitation, a person might respond, “Yep, I’ll be there.”

4. Uh-huh

Uh-huh is an informal and verbal way of saying yes. It is often used to show agreement or acknowledgment during a conversation.

  • For instance, when someone is telling a story and asks, “Do you understand?”, a listener might respond, “Uh-huh, I get it.”
  • In a discussion about future plans, one person might say, “Uh-huh, I’m definitely interested.”
  • When confirming a request, someone might respond, “Uh-huh, I can do that.”

5. Mhmm

Mhmm is a verbal expression used to indicate agreement or confirmation. It is often used to show attentiveness or agreement during a conversation.

  • For example, when someone is explaining a concept and asks, “Does that make sense?”, a listener might respond, “Mhmm, I understand.”
  • In a conversation about food preferences, one person might say, “Mhmm, I love spicy food.”
  • When confirming a statement, someone might respond, “Mhmm, that’s correct.”

6. Sure

Used to express agreement or confirmation. It is a casual way of saying “yes”.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this?”, you can respond with “Sure, I’d be happy to.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I think we should go to the beach today,” and the other person can reply, “Sure, that sounds like a great idea.”
  • If someone asks if you want to grab dinner, you can say, “Sure, I’m hungry.”

7. Absolutely

Used to strongly affirm or agree with something. It indicates complete certainty or agreement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “Do you want to go to the party tonight?”, you can respond with “Absolutely, I wouldn’t miss it.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, one person might say, “The acting was incredible,” and another person can reply, “Absolutely, the performances were outstanding.”
  • If someone asks if you enjoyed the concert, you can say, “Absolutely, it was amazing.”

8. Definitely

Used to express a strong and certain affirmation. It indicates a clear and unwavering agreement or confirmation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the meeting?”, you can respond with “Definitely, I’ll be there.”
  • In a conversation about travel, one person might say, “I would love to visit Paris,” and the other person can reply, “Definitely, it’s a beautiful city.”
  • If someone asks if you want dessert, you can say, “Definitely, I have a sweet tooth.”

9. You bet

Used to enthusiastically agree or confirm something. It is an informal way of expressing a positive response.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you lend me some money?”, you can respond with “You bet, how much do you need?”
  • In a discussion about a sports team, one person might say, “They’re going to win the championship,” and another person can reply, “You bet, they’re the best.”
  • If someone asks if you want to go for a hike, you can say, “You bet, I love being outdoors.”

10. For sure

Used to indicate a definite agreement or confirmation. It expresses certainty or agreement in a casual manner.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you pick up some groceries?”, you can respond with “For sure, I’ll stop by the store.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, one person might say, “Let’s go to the beach,” and the other person can reply, “For sure, that sounds relaxing.”
  • If someone asks if you want to watch a movie, you can say, “For sure, I’m in the mood for some entertainment.”

11. No doubt

This phrase is used to express complete agreement or certainty. It is often used to emphasize a strong affirmation or confirmation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the party?” you might respond, “No doubt, I’ll be there.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “We’re going hiking tomorrow, no doubt about it.”
  • A person might use this phrase to show agreement with a statement by saying, “No doubt, that’s the best pizza in town.”

12. Affirmative

This word is used as a formal way to say “yes” or to confirm something. It is often used in professional or official settings.

  • For instance, in the military, a soldier might respond to a command with a simple “affirmative.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “I can confirm that, affirmative.”
  • A person might use this word to agree with a statement by saying, “Affirmative, I totally agree with you.”

13. Yea

This is a casual way to say “yes” or to show agreement. It is often used in informal conversations or among friends.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to grab dinner?” you might respond, “Yea, that sounds good.”
  • In a group chat, someone might reply to a funny message with a simple “yea.”
  • A person might use this word to express agreement with a statement by saying, “Yea, I think you’re right about that.”

14. Aye

This is a traditional way to say “yes” or to indicate agreement. It is often associated with nautical or military contexts.

  • For instance, during a ship’s roll call, sailors might respond with a hearty “aye” to confirm their presence.
  • In a historical drama, a character might say, “Aye, captain” to acknowledge a command.
  • A person might use this word to show agreement with a statement by saying, “Aye, I agree with you on that.”

15. Indeed

This word is used to express agreement or to confirm something that has been said. It is often used to emphasize a strong affirmation or acknowledgment.

  • For example, if someone says, “It’s a beautiful day,” you might respond, “Indeed it is.”
  • In a discussion about a topic, someone might say, “Indeed, that’s a valid point.”
  • A person might use this word to affirm a statement by saying, “Indeed, that’s exactly what I was thinking.”

16. Righto

A casual and affirmative way of saying “yes” or expressing agreement. “Righto” is a slang term that is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go grab some pizza?”, you might respond, “Righto! Let’s do it.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, one person might say, “I’m thinking of going hiking on Saturday.” The other might reply, “Righto, that sounds like a great idea.”
  • When someone suggests watching a movie, you could reply with a smile and say, “Righto, I’m up for it!”

17. Roger

Derived from the phonetic alphabet, “Roger” is used as a way to acknowledge a message or indicate understanding. It is often used in professional or formal settings, such as military or aviation communications.

  • For instance, if someone gives you instructions and asks if you understand, you might respond with a simple “Roger” to indicate that you’ve received and understood the information.
  • In a team meeting, a member might say, “We need to finish this project by Friday.” Another team member could respond, “Roger, I’ll make sure we stay on track.”
  • During a flight, a pilot might receive clearance from air traffic control and respond with a confident “Roger.”

18. Totally

A more casual and emphatic way of saying “yes” or expressing agreement. “Totally” is often used to show enthusiasm or strong support for a statement or idea.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to come to the concert with me?”, you might reply, “Totally! I’ve been wanting to see that band.”
  • In a discussion about a new restaurant, one person might say, “The food there is amazing.” Another person could respond, “Totally, I had the best meal of my life there.”
  • When someone suggests going for a hike, you could respond with excitement and say, “Totally! I love spending time in nature.”

19. Alrighty

A playful and informal way of saying “yes” or expressing agreement. “Alrighty” is a slang term that adds a sense of friendliness or positivity to a response.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this?”, you might reply, “Alrighty! What do you need?”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, one person might say, “Let’s go to the beach.” The other might reply, “Alrighty, sounds like a plan.”
  • When someone suggests grabbing a coffee, you could respond with a smile and say, “Alrighty, I could use a caffeine boost!”

20. Yaas

A playful and enthusiastic way of saying “yes.” “Yaas” is often used to show excitement or approval, especially in pop culture or online contexts.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go shopping?”, you might reply, “Yaas! I’ve been wanting to check out the new store.”
  • In a discussion about a favorite TV show, one person might say, “The season finale was amazing.” Another person could respond, “Yaas, I couldn’t believe what happened!”
  • When someone suggests going to a party, you could respond with enthusiasm and say, “Yaas, I’m ready to dance the night away!”

21. Yass

“Yass” is an enthusiastic way of saying “yes” or showing excitement or agreement. It is often used to show enthusiasm or support for something.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you excited for the concert?” you might respond, “Yass, I can’t wait!”
  • In a conversation about a new movie, you might say, “Yass, that film was amazing!”
  • When a friend suggests going out for pizza, you might exclaim, “Yass, let’s do it!”

22. Okay

Okay is a common slang term used to express agreement or acceptance of something. It can be used in a casual or nonchalant way.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you want to go to the movies, you might respond, “Okay, sounds good.”
  • In a conversation about plans for the weekend, you might say, “Okay, let’s meet at the park.”
  • When someone suggests trying a new restaurant, you might reply, “Okay, I’m up for it!”

23. Yip

Yip is a slang term used to express a positive response or agreement. It is often used in a casual or playful manner.

  • For example, if a friend asks if you want to join them for a party, you might respond, “Yip, count me in!”
  • In a conversation about going on a road trip, you might say, “Yip, I’m ready for an adventure!”
  • When someone suggests ordering takeout for dinner, you might reply, “Yip, I’m hungry!”

24. True dat

“True dat” is a slang term used to express agreement or affirmation. It is often used to show that you agree with someone or acknowledge the truth of a statement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “That movie was amazing,” you might respond, “True dat, I loved it too!”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, you might say, “True dat, it’s a complex issue.”
  • When someone shares a personal experience, you might reply, “True dat, I can relate to that.”

25. Fo’ shizzle

“Fo’ shizzle” is a slang term used to express enthusiastic agreement or confirmation. It is a variation of “for sure” and is often associated with hip-hop culture.

  • For example, if a friend asks if you want to go to a party, you might respond, “Fo’ shizzle, let’s do it!”
  • In a conversation about a new album release, you might say, “Fo’ shizzle, I’m excited to listen to it!”
  • When someone suggests going on a road trip, you might reply, “Fo’ shizzle, that sounds like fun!”

26. Word

A casual and informal way of saying “yes”. It is commonly used in conversations or text messages.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go out tonight?”, you can respond with “Word, let’s do it!”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “Are we all meeting at the park tomorrow?” and another person can reply, “Word, see you there!”
  • When confirming a plan, you might say, “Word, I’ll be there at 8 PM.”

27. Si

The Spanish word for “yes”. It is used to affirm or agree with a statement or question.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “¿Hablas español?” (Do you speak Spanish?), you can respond with “Si, hablo español.” (Yes, I speak Spanish.)
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Es un buen restaurante” (It’s a good restaurant), and you can reply with “Si, la comida es deliciosa.” (Yes, the food is delicious.)
  • When confirming a plan, you might say, “Si, nos vemos a las 7 PM.” (Yes, see you at 7 PM.)
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28. Oui

The French word for “yes”. It is used to affirm or agree with a statement or question.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Parlez-vous français?” (Do you speak French?), you can respond with “Oui, je parle français.” (Yes, I speak French.)
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “C’est une belle journée” (It’s a beautiful day), and you can reply with “Oui, le soleil brille.” (Yes, the sun is shining.)
  • When confirming a plan, you might say, “Oui, je serai là à 18 heures.” (Yes, I’ll be there at 6 PM.)

29. Ja

The German word for “yes”. It is used to affirm or agree with a statement or question.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Sprechen Sie Deutsch?” (Do you speak German?), you can respond with “Ja, ich spreche Deutsch.” (Yes, I speak German.)
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Es ist ein schöner Tag” (It’s a beautiful day), and you can reply with “Ja, die Sonne scheint.” (Yes, the sun is shining.)
  • When confirming a plan, you might say, “Ja, ich bin um 18 Uhr da.” (Yes, I’ll be there at 6 PM.)

30. Da

The Russian word for “yes”. It is used to affirm or agree with a statement or question.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Вы говорите по-русски?” (Do you speak Russian?), you can respond with “Da, ya govoryu po-russki.” (Yes, I speak Russian.)
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Это хороший день” (It’s a good day), and you can reply with “Da, solntse svetit.” (Yes, the sun is shining.)
  • When confirming a plan, you might say, “Da, ya budu tam v 18:00.” (Yes, I’ll be there at 6 PM.)

31. Yarp

This slang term is derived from the British police drama “Hot Fuzz” and is used to express agreement or affirmation. It is often used humorously or in a sarcastic manner.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go get ice cream?” you might respond, “Yarp, I’m down for some ice cream.”
  • In a playful conversation, one person might say, “Yarp, that’s the best idea I’ve heard all day.”
  • Someone might use this term ironically, saying, “Yarp, because saying ‘yes’ is too mainstream.”

32. Indubitably

This formal-sounding word is used to express strong agreement or certainty. It is often used humorously or in a sarcastic manner to add emphasis to a positive response.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you think we should go on vacation?” you might respond, “Indubitably! Let’s book those tickets.”
  • In a conversation about a delicious meal, one might exclaim, “Indubitably, that was the best burger I’ve ever had.”
  • Someone might use this word playfully, saying, “Indubitably, because saying ‘yes’ is too boring.”

33. Verily

This archaic-sounding word is used to express agreement or affirmation. It is often used humorously or in a sarcastic manner to add a touch of old-fashioned charm to a positive response.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Shall we go for a walk?” you might respond, “Verily, let’s enjoy the fresh air.”
  • In a conversation about a funny video, one might say, “Verily, that made me laugh out loud.”
  • Someone might use this word playfully, saying, “Verily, because saying ‘yes’ is too ordinary.”

34. Yessiree

This folksy slang term is used to express enthusiastic agreement or affirmation. It is often used in casual conversations or to add a touch of Southern charm to a positive response.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the beach?” you might respond, “Yessiree, I’ve been craving some sun and sand.”
  • In a conversation about a fun activity, one might exclaim, “Yessiree, count me in for some adventure.”
  • Someone might use this term playfully, saying, “Yessiree, because saying ‘yes’ is too plain.”

35. Yessir

This informal slang term is used to express agreement or affirmation, especially towards a male authority figure. It is often used in casual conversations or to show respect while giving a positive response.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this task?” you might respond, “Yessir, I’ll be glad to lend a hand.”
  • In a conversation about a sports game, one might say, “Yessir, that was an amazing play.”
  • Someone might use this term respectfully, saying, “Yessir, because saying ‘yes’ is too plain.”

36. Yessum

A colloquial way of saying “yes” that is commonly used in the southern United States. It is a combination of “yes” and “sir” or “ma’am”.

  • For example, when asked if they want more food, someone might respond, “Yessum, I’ll take another helping.”
  • A person might use this term when addressing someone in a respectful manner, such as saying, “Yessum, I understand your point of view.”
  • In a casual conversation, one might say, “Yessum, I’ll meet you at the park at 3 o’clock.”

37. Sho’nuff

A slang term used to express agreement or affirmation. It is a shortened form of “sure enough”.

  • For instance, when asked if they want to go to the movies, someone might reply, “Sho’nuff, I’d love to.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “This pizza is amazing!” and the other might respond, “Sho’nuff, it’s the best I’ve had.”
  • When someone suggests a plan, another person might say, “Sho’nuff, let’s do it!”

38. Hell yeah

An emphatic way of saying “yes” to express strong agreement or enthusiasm. It is often used to show excitement or approval.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to go to a concert, you might respond, “Hell yeah, I’ve been waiting for this!”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I just got promoted!” and the other might reply, “Hell yeah, you deserve it!”
  • When someone suggests an adventurous activity, another person might exclaim, “Hell yeah, that sounds amazing!”

39. Darn tootin’

A lighthearted way of saying “yes” to show agreement or affirmation. It is often used to add emphasis or humor to the response.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you enjoyed a movie, you might reply, “Darn tootin’, it was hilarious!”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I aced my exam!” and the other might respond, “Darn tootin’, you’re a genius!”
  • When someone suggests a fun activity, another person might say, “Darn tootin’, count me in!”

40. Yep yep

A casual and informal way of saying “yes” to indicate agreement or confirmation. The repetition of “yep” adds emphasis and enthusiasm to the response.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to grab lunch, you might reply, “Yep yep, I’m hungry!”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I finished the project ahead of schedule!” and the other might exclaim, “Yep yep, you’re amazing!”
  • When someone suggests a plan, another person might say, “Yep yep, let’s do it!”

41. Yesh

A variation of “yes” often used to convey enthusiasm or agreement. “Yesh” is a playful and informal way of saying yes.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go out for dinner?”, you might respond, “Yesh, I would love to!”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “We’re going to the beach tomorrow, yesh?”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you help me with this project?” and you could reply, “Yesh, I’ll be happy to assist.”

42. Yupper

A casual and affirmative response, similar to “yes.” “Yupper” is a slang term often used in relaxed or informal conversations.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Did you finish your homework?”, you might reply, “Yupper, all done!”
  • In a discussion about preferences, someone might say, “I love pizza, yupper!”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you coming to the party?” and you could respond with, “Yupper, wouldn’t miss it!”

43. Yessireebob

An emphatic and enthusiastic way of saying “yes.” “Yessireebob” is a playful and lighthearted expression often used to convey excitement or agreement.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you ready for the concert?”, you might respond, “Yessireebob, I can’t wait!”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “Let’s go hiking this weekend, yessireebob!”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you want to try this new restaurant?” and you could reply, “Yessireebob, sounds delicious!”

44. Yea verily

An archaic and poetic way of saying “yes.” “Yea verily” is a phrase often associated with old-fashioned or formal language.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you swear to tell the truth?”, you might respond, “Yea verily, I do.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, someone might say, “Yea verily, it was a time of great change.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you excited for the trip?” and you could reply with, “Yea verily, I can’t wait!”

45. Yay

An exclamation of joy or excitement, often used to express agreement or approval. “Yay” is a cheerful and informal way of saying yes.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want ice cream?”, you might respond, “Yay, I love ice cream!”
  • In a conversation about upcoming events, someone might say, “We’re going to the amusement park, yay!”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you come to my party?” and you could reply with, “Yay, I’ll be there!”

46. Yop

A slang term for “yes”. It is often used to show agreement or affirmation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go out for dinner?”, you can respond with “Yop, that sounds great.”
  • In a casual conversation, one might say, “Yop, I agree with you.”
  • When confirming plans, you can say, “Yop, I’ll be there.”

47. Yaw

A slang term for “yes”. It is often used to show agreement or confirmation.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this?”, you can respond with “Yaw, of course.”
  • In a conversation, you might say, “Yaw, I agree with what you’re saying.”
  • When answering a question, you can simply say, “Yaw.”

48. Yeh

A slang term for “yes”. It is often used to show agreement or affirmation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the movies?”, you can respond with “Yeh, I’d love to.”
  • In a conversation, you might say, “Yeh, I agree with you.”
  • When confirming plans, you can say, “Yeh, I’ll be there.”

49. Yawp

A slang term for “yes”. It is often used to show agreement or affirmation, particularly in a more enthusiastic or energetic way.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Are you excited for the concert?”, you can respond with “Yawp, I can’t wait!”
  • In a conversation, you might say, “Yawp, I totally agree with you.”
  • When confirming plans, you can say, “Yawp, I’ll be there for sure.”

50. Yuppity

A slang term for “yes”. It is often used to show agreement or affirmation, particularly in a more sarcastic or exaggerated way.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you think you’re better than everyone else?”, you can respond with “Yuppity, I’m the best!”
  • In a conversation, you might say, “Yuppity, I totally agree with you, Mr. Know-it-all.”
  • When confirming plans, you can say, “Yuppity, count me in!”

51. Yis

A slang term for “yes.” It is often used to express agreement or confirmation in a more informal or playful manner.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go out for dinner tonight?” you can respond with “Yis!”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might say, “Yis, let’s go hiking!”
  • When asked if they enjoyed a movie, a person might reply, “Yis, it was amazing!”

52. Yiss

A variation of “yes” that is often used to show excitement or enthusiasm. It is commonly used in informal or casual conversations.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Did you get the job?” you can reply with “Yiss!”
  • In a discussion about a party, someone might say, “Yiss, I can’t wait to dance all night!”
  • When asked if they want to try a new restaurant, a person might respond, “Yiss, I’ve heard great things about it!”

53. Yos

A slang term for “yes” that is often used in a more laid-back or casual manner. It is commonly used among friends or in informal settings.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to hang out later?” you can reply with “Yos!”
  • In a conversation about going to a concert, someone might say, “Yos, I’m definitely going!”
  • When asked if they enjoyed a recent vacation, a person might respond, “Yos, it was so much fun!”

54. Yuss

A slang term for “yes” that is often used to show excitement or agreement. It is commonly used in informal or friendly conversations.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Would you like some ice cream?” you can reply with “Yuss!”
  • In a discussion about going on a road trip, someone might say, “Yuss, I’m ready for an adventure!”
  • When asked if they want to join a sports team, a person might respond, “Yuss, I love playing sports!”

55. Yazzo

A slang term for “yes” that is often used in a more playful or exaggerated manner. It is commonly used among friends or in informal situations.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go shopping?” you can reply with “Yazzo!”
  • In a conversation about trying a new restaurant, someone might say, “Yazzo, let’s go all out!”
  • When asked if they want to watch a movie, a person might respond, “Yazzo, I’m in the mood for a comedy!”

56. AAffirmative

A slang term for “yes” or agreement. It is often used in a casual or playful manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “Do you want to go to the movies?” and the response could be, “AAffirmative, let’s do it!”
  • In a group chat, a person might use AAffirmative to show their agreement with a statement like, “AAffirmative, that sounds like a plan.”
  • A person might use AAffirmative to emphasize their enthusiasm for something, like saying, “AAffirmative, I am definitely going to the concert!”

57. Aight

A slang term for “yes” or agreement. It is often used in a casual or laid-back manner.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you want to grab dinner tonight?” a response could be, “Aight, let’s do it!”
  • In a conversation among friends, one might say, “We’re going to the beach tomorrow, you coming?” and the reply could be, “Aight, count me in!”
  • A person might use Aight to show their agreement with a statement, like saying, “Aight, that’s a good idea.”

58. Ayuh

A slang term for “yes” or agreement. It is commonly used in the New England region of the United States, particularly in Maine.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want some more lobster?” a person from Maine might respond, “Ayuh, I’ll take another serving!”
  • In a conversation about local traditions, one might say, “In Maine, we say ‘ayuh’ instead of ‘yes’.”
  • A person might use Ayuh to show their agreement with a statement, like saying, “Ayuh, that’s exactly what I was thinking.”

59. Bet

A slang term for “yes” or agreement. It is often used to confirm a plan or express confidence in something.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I’ll meet you at the coffee shop at 3 PM,” the response could be, “Bet, see you there!”
  • In a conversation among friends, one might say, “I bet you can’t finish that whole pizza by yourself,” and the reply could be, “Bet, watch me!”
  • A person might use Bet to show their agreement with a statement, like saying, “Bet, I’m on board with that idea.”

60. Chaa/Cha

A slang term for “yes” or agreement. It is often used in a casual or informal manner.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the party tonight?” a response could be, “Chaa, I’m down!”
  • In a conversation among friends, one might say, “I heard there’s free food at the event,” and the reply could be, “Cha, let’s check it out!”
  • A person might use Chaa/Cha to show their agreement with a statement, like saying, “Cha, that’s a great idea.”

61. Damn Skippy

This phrase is used to strongly agree or confirm something. It is often used to express enthusiasm or certainty.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you excited for the concert?” You might respond, “Damn skippy, I can’t wait!”
  • In a conversation about a successful business venture, someone might say, “We made a ton of money, damn skippy!”
  • If a friend suggests going out for pizza and you love pizza, you might say, “Damn skippy, let’s do it!”

62. Damn Straight

This phrase is used to strongly affirm or agree with something. It is often used to show conviction or certainty.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Are you sure you want to quit your job?” You might respond, “Damn straight, I’m tired of it!”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I believe in free speech, damn straight!”
  • If a friend suggests going to a party and you’re excited about it, you might say, “Damn straight, let’s go and have a great time!”

63. Does a Bear S*** in the Woods?

This phrase is a rhetorical question used to sarcastically imply an obvious and affirmative answer. It is often used to express disbelief or emphasize a point.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you think he’ll show up late again?” You might respond, “Does a bear s*** in the woods?”
  • In a conversation about someone’s laziness, one might say, “Does a bear s*** in the woods? Of course he won’t do the dishes!”
  • If a friend asks, “Are you excited for the party?” and you are, you might respond, “Does a bear s*** in the woods? I can’t wait!”

64. Fo Sho/Fo Shizzle

This phrase is a slang variation of “for sure” and is used to express agreement, certainty, or confirmation. It is often associated with hip hop culture.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the concert?” You might respond, “Fo sho, wouldn’t miss it!”
  • In a conversation about plans for the weekend, someone might say, “I’m going to the beach, fo shizzle!”
  • If a friend suggests going out for dinner and you’re interested, you might say, “Fo sho, let’s find a good restaurant!”

65. For Real

This phrase is used to affirm or confirm something in a genuine or sincere manner. It is often used to express agreement or authenticity.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you win the lottery?” You might respond, “For real, I can’t believe it!”
  • In a conversation about someone’s accomplishments, one might say, “She climbed Mount Everest, for real!”
  • If a friend suggests going on a road trip and you’re excited about it, you might say, “For real, that sounds like an amazing adventure!”

66. Sounds Good

This phrase is used to indicate that something is acceptable or satisfactory.

  • For example, if someone suggests going to a certain restaurant, you might respond, “Sounds good!”
  • When making plans with a friend, they might say, “Let’s meet at 7 pm,” and you can reply, “Sounds good to me.”
  • In a work setting, if your coworker proposes a solution to a problem, you can say, “That sounds good, let’s give it a try.”

67. Sure Thing

This phrase is used to express willingness or agreement with something.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you can help them with a task, you can reply, “Sure thing!”
  • When someone suggests going to see a movie, you might say, “Sure thing, I’m free tonight.”
  • In a conversation about meeting up, if someone proposes a specific time and place, you can respond, “Sure thing, see you there!”

68. Totes

This slang term is used to express complete agreement or affirmation.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to go to a party, you can respond, “Totes!”
  • When discussing a plan with a friend, they might say, “Let’s go shopping tomorrow,” and you can reply, “Totes, I need new clothes.”
  • In a conversation about trying a new restaurant, if someone suggests a particular dish, you can say, “Totes, that sounds delicious!”

69. True That/Tru That

This phrase is used to show agreement or affirmation with a statement.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The weather is terrible today,” you can respond, “True that!”
  • When discussing a controversial topic, someone might state their opinion, and you can reply, “Tru that, I feel the same way.”
  • In a conversation about a recent news event, if someone shares a fact, you can say, “True that, I read about it too!”

70. Ya

This word is a casual and abbreviated way of saying “yes”.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want dessert, you can simply reply, “Ya.”
  • When confirming a plan with a friend, they might say, “We’re meeting at 6 pm, ya?” and you can respond, “Ya, see you then.”
  • In a conversation about attending an event, if someone asks if you’re going, you can say, “Ya, I’ll be there.”

71. Yas

This is a slang term used to express excitement, agreement, or enthusiasm. It is often used to show support or approval.

  • For example, “Yas, queen!” is a popular phrase used to show excitement and support for someone.
  • Another usage example would be, “Yas, I’m so excited for the concert tonight!”
  • Someone might also say, “Yas, that outfit looks amazing on you!”

72. Ye

This is a shortened version of “yes” and is often used in casual conversations or informal settings.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Ye, I’ll be there in a few minutes.”
  • Another usage example would be, “Do you want some ice cream?” to which someone might respond, “Ye, please!”

73. Yepperdoodles/Yupperdoodles

These are playful and exaggerated variations of “yes” often used to add emphasis or express enthusiasm.

  • For example, someone might say, “Yepperdoodles, I’d love to go to the party!”
  • Another usage example would be, “Yupperdoodles, count me in for the game tomorrow!”

74. Yer

This is a casual and shortened version of “yes,” often used in informal conversations or among friends.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Yer, let’s grab dinner later.”
  • Another usage example would be, “Yer, I agree with you on that.”

75. Yis/Yiss

These are variations of “yes” often used in certain dialects or regional slang.

  • For example, in some Irish dialects, someone might say, “Yis, I’ll be there.”
  • Another usage example would be, “Yiss, I’m excited for the party tomorrow!”

76. Yomp

This slang term combines “yes” with the sound of someone munching on food. It is often used to show enthusiasm or agreement.

  • For example, “Hey, want to grab pizza for dinner?” “Yomp! I’m starving.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you want to go to the movies tonight?” and you can reply, “Yomp, sounds like fun!”
  • When someone suggests going for ice cream, you can respond with, “Yomp, I’m in the mood for something sweet!”

77. You Betcha

This phrase is a playful way of saying “yes” or expressing agreement. It is often used in a lighthearted or enthusiastic manner.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Are you ready for the party?” you can respond with, “You betcha! I can’t wait.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m making tacos for dinner, want some?” and you can reply, “You betcha! I love tacos.”
  • When someone suggests going on a road trip, you can exclaim, “You betcha! Let’s hit the road!”

78. Yuppers/Yeppers

These slang terms are playful variations of “yes” and are often used to show agreement or affirmation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go for a walk?” you can respond with, “Yuppers! It’s a beautiful day.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m ordering pizza for lunch, want some?” and you can reply, “Yeppers! I’m craving pizza.”
  • When someone suggests watching a movie, you can say, “Yuppers! I’m in the mood for some popcorn and a good film.”

79. Yush

This slang term is a shortened version of “yes” and is often used in casual conversations or text messages.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you want to hang out tonight?” you can respond with, “Yush! What time?”
  • A friend might say, “I found tickets to the concert, want to come?” and you can reply, “Yush! I love that band.”
  • When someone suggests ordering takeout, you can say, “Yush! I’m too tired to cook tonight.”

80. Without a doubt

This phrase is a more formal way of saying “yes” and is often used to express certainty or agreement.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you sure you want to quit your job?” you can respond with, “Without a doubt. It’s time for a change.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m planning a surprise party for Sarah, can you keep it a secret?” and you can reply, “Without a doubt. Mum’s the word.”
  • When someone suggests going on a hike, you can say, “Without a doubt. I love spending time in nature.”

81. Positively

This slang term is used to express strong agreement or affirmation. It is similar in meaning to “definitely” or “certainly”.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the party?”, you might respond, “Positively!”
  • In a conversation about a great movie, you might say, “I positively loved it.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “That’s positively amazing!”

82. Of course

This slang phrase is used to indicate a strong affirmative response. It is often used to express agreement or to confirm something that is obvious.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this?”, you might reply, “Of course!”
  • In a discussion about a favorite hobby, you might say, “Of course, I enjoy it.”
  • Someone might state, “Of course I’ll be there for you.”

83. Most definitely

This slang term is used to convey a strong and enthusiastic agreement. It is similar in meaning to “definitely” or “without a doubt”.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go out tonight?”, you might respond, “Most definitely!”
  • In a conversation about a delicious meal, you might say, “It was most definitely worth the wait.”
  • Someone might assert, “That’s most definitely the best solution.”

84. Naturally

This slang term is used to indicate agreement or affirmation in a casual and relaxed manner. It implies that the answer or action is expected or obvious.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you pass the salt?”, you might reply, “Naturally.”
  • In a discussion about a favorite activity, you might say, “Naturally, I enjoy it.”
  • Someone might state, “Naturally, I’ll be there on time.”

85. Without question

This slang phrase is used to express a strong and unwavering agreement. It implies that there is no room for doubt or hesitation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you ready to start?”, you might reply, “Without question!”
  • In a conversation about a reliable friend, you might say, “He’s without question the most trustworthy person I know.”
  • Someone might assert, “That decision is without question the right one.”

86. Certainly

This word is used to express absolute agreement or confirmation. It is a more formal and polite way of saying “yes”.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this task?”, you might respond, “Certainly, I’d be happy to.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “Certainly, we can accommodate that request.”
  • If someone asks, “Are you coming to the party?”, you could reply, “Certainly, wouldn’t miss it!”

87. Affirm

This word is used as a concise and direct way of saying “yes”. It is often used in military or radio communication.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Did you receive the message?”, you might simply respond, “Affirm.”
  • In a formal setting, a presenter might ask, “Does everyone understand?”, and the audience could respond with an “Affirm”.
  • In a military operation, a commander might give the order, “Affirmative, proceed with the mission.”

88. Roger that

This phrase is used to acknowledge understanding or agreement. It originated from radio communication and is commonly used in military or aviation contexts.

  • For example, if a pilot receives instructions from air traffic control, they might respond with “Roger that” to indicate they understood.
  • In a team setting, if the leader gives directions, team members might respond with “Roger that” to show they received and understood the instructions.
  • If someone asks, “Can you pick up some groceries?”, you could reply, “Roger that, I’ll grab what you need.”

89. No problem

This phrase is used to express agreement or willingness to do something without any difficulty or hesitation.

  • For instance, if someone thanks you for a favor, you might respond with “No problem” to indicate it was not a burden.
  • In a customer service interaction, if a customer requests a change, the representative might say, “No problem, we can take care of that for you.”
  • If someone asks, “Can you help me move this heavy box?”, you could reply, “No problem, I’ll give you a hand.”

90. Yuppers

This is an informal and playful variation of “yes”. It is often used in casual conversations or among friends.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to grab dinner tonight?”, you might respond with “Yuppers” to indicate your agreement.
  • In a group chat, if someone proposes a plan and asks for confirmation, you could simply reply with “Yuppers”.
  • If a friend asks, “Can you lend me some money?”, you might jokingly reply, “Yuppers, but don’t forget to pay me back!”

91. You got it

This phrase is used to express agreement or acceptance of a request or proposition. It is a casual way of saying “yes”.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you help me with this task?” you can respond with “You got it!”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “We need someone to take charge of this project.” and another person can reply, “I got it!”
  • When a friend asks, “Can you pick me up from the airport?” you can say, “Sure, you got it!”

92. I’m in

This phrase is used to indicate willingness or agreement to participate in an activity or event. It is a casual way of saying “yes” or “count me in”.

  • For instance, if someone suggests going out for dinner, you can respond with “I’m in!”
  • When planning a weekend getaway, you might say, “If everyone is going, I’m in!”
  • A friend might invite you to a concert and you can reply, “I’m in, let’s rock!”

93. All right

This phrase is used to express agreement or permission. It can be used to indicate acceptance or confirmation of a plan or idea.

  • For example, if someone suggests a change in the schedule, you can respond with “All right, let’s do it.”
  • When asked if you are ready to leave, you can say, “All right, I’m ready!”
  • If someone asks for your permission to use your car, you can say, “All right, just be careful.”

94. Without hesitation

This phrase is used to emphasize immediate and unwavering agreement or acceptance. It indicates that there is no doubt or hesitation in saying “yes”.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Would you like to join us for dinner?” you can respond with “Without hesitation!”
  • When offered a promotion at work, you might say, “Without hesitation, I accept!”
  • If a friend asks for your support, you can say, “Without hesitation, I’m here for you!”

95. By all means

This phrase is used to express enthusiastic and wholehearted agreement or approval. It indicates a strong willingness to say “yes” or support a decision or action.

  • For example, if someone suggests trying a new restaurant, you can respond with “By all means, let’s give it a try!”
  • When asked if you are willing to help with a project, you can say, “By all means, I’m here to assist!”
  • If someone asks for your opinion and you strongly agree, you can say, “By all means, go for it!”

96. Count me in

This phrase is used to express enthusiasm and agreement to join or participate in an activity or event.

  • For example, if someone invites you to a party, you can respond with “Count me in!”
  • When organizing a group outing, you might say, “Who wants to go hiking this weekend? Count me in!”
  • If a friend asks if you want to join them for a movie, you can reply, “That sounds fun, count me in!”

97. That’s a yes

This phrase is used to indicate a strong and definitive affirmative response.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you want to go out for dinner, you can respond with “That’s a yes!”
  • When a friend suggests going on a road trip, you might exclaim, “That’s a yes, let’s do it!”
  • If someone offers you a promotion at work, you can enthusiastically reply, “That’s a yes, I accept!”

98. I’d love to

This phrase is used to express eagerness and willingness to participate or engage in an activity or event.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to go shopping, you can respond with “I’d love to!”
  • When a friend invites you to a concert, you might say, “I’d love to go, thanks for inviting me!”
  • If someone suggests trying a new restaurant, you can reply, “I’d love to, it sounds delicious!”

99. I’m down

This phrase is used to indicate a positive response and willingness to join or engage in an activity or event.

  • For instance, if someone suggests going for a bike ride, you can respond with “I’m down!”
  • When a friend proposes playing a game, you might say, “I’m down to play, let’s do it!”
  • If someone asks if you want to grab coffee, you can reply, “I’m down, let’s meet up!”

100. Sign me up

This phrase is used to express eagerness and enthusiasm to be a part of an activity or event.

  • For example, if someone mentions a cooking class, you can respond with “Sign me up!”
  • When a friend talks about a book club, you might say, “Sign me up, I love reading!”
  • If someone suggests joining a sports team, you can reply, “Sign me up, I enjoy playing sports!”