Top 82 Slang For Suicidal – Meaning & Usage

In a world where mental health awareness is more crucial than ever, understanding the language surrounding sensitive topics is essential. Join us as we delve into the realm of slang for suicidal, shedding light on the terms and expressions used in this context. Our team has carefully curated this list to help you navigate these conversations with empathy and understanding. Let’s break the stigma and start a conversation that truly matters.

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1. Offing oneself

This phrase is a slang term used to describe the act of taking one’s own life. It is often used in a casual or joking manner, but it refers to a serious and tragic event.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe he offed himself. It’s so sad.”
  • In a dark comedy, a character might say, “If my boss keeps treating me like this, I’m going to off myself.”
  • A person discussing mental health might say, “It’s important to reach out for help if you’re feeling like offing yourself.”

2. Taking a dirt nap

This phrase is slang for dying, but it is often used in a more humorous or light-hearted way. It implies a permanent rest, as if one were buried in the ground.

  • For example, someone might say, “If I have to sit through another boring meeting, I might just take a dirt nap.”
  • In a comedy movie, a character might say, “I don’t want to take a dirt nap just yet. There’s still so much I want to do.”
  • A person discussing mortality might say, “We all have to take a dirt nap eventually, but let’s make the most of our time here.”

3. Checking out early

This phrase is slang for committing suicide, suggesting that the person is choosing to leave life before their natural time is up. It is a euphemism that can be used to avoid directly discussing suicide.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I heard she checked out early. It’s such a tragedy.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might say, “Sometimes people feel so hopeless that they think checking out early is the only option.”
  • A person discussing the importance of seeking help might say, “If you’re feeling overwhelmed, remember that there are resources available to prevent checking out early.”

4. Riding the lightning

This phrase is slang for either being electrocuted or choosing to end one’s life by means of the electric chair. It is a dark and morbid expression that is often used in a metaphorical sense.

  • For example, someone might say, “If I have to sit through another boring lecture, I might as well be riding the lightning.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “He knew the consequences of his actions and chose to ride the lightning.”
  • A person discussing the power of electricity might say, “We should always respect electricity. It has the potential to ride the lightning if mishandled.”

5. Punching one’s ticket

This phrase is slang for committing suicide, suggesting that the person is taking control of their own destiny and choosing when and how they will die. It is a metaphorical expression that can be used to avoid directly discussing suicide.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He punched his ticket last night. It’s such a tragedy.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might say, “Sometimes people feel so hopeless that they think punching their ticket is the only way out.”
  • A person discussing the importance of support might say, “We need to be there for each other, especially when someone is feeling like punching their ticket.”

6. Choosing the final exit

This phrase refers to making the decision to take one’s own life, often used in a euphemistic or metaphorical sense.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been struggling for a long time, and now he’s choosing the final exit.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “It’s important to reach out to someone who is contemplating choosing the final exit.”
  • A news article might use this phrase in a headline, such as “Celebrity Opens Up About Choosing the Final Exit.”

7. Ending it all

This phrase is a colloquial way of referring to the act of ending one’s life, often used in a dramatic or finalizing sense.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t handle this anymore. I’m thinking about ending it all.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might express concern by saying, “Please don’t think about ending it all. Reach out for help.”
  • A news report might use this phrase to describe a tragic event, such as “Local Man Found Dead After Ending It All.”

8. Checking out

This phrase is a slang term for the act of ending one’s life, often used in a casual or nonchalant manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m so tired of everything. I feel like checking out.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might express their own struggles by saying, “Sometimes I think about checking out, but I know I need to seek help.”
  • A fictional character in a book or movie might use this phrase to describe their state of mind, such as “I’m done with it all. I just want to check out.”

9. Doing oneself in

This phrase is a colloquial way of referring to the act of taking one’s own life, often used in a self-blaming or self-destructive context.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe she did herself in. It’s such a tragedy.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might express concern by saying, “Please don’t think about doing yourself in. Reach out for help.”
  • A news report might use this phrase to describe a suicide attempt, such as “Local Teen Hospitalized After Trying to Do Himself In.”

10. Taking the plunge

This phrase is a metaphorical way of referring to the act of committing suicide, often used to describe the moment of making the final decision.

  • For example, someone might say, “He had been contemplating suicide for a while, but he finally took the plunge.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might express their own struggles by saying, “I’ve been thinking about taking the plunge, but I know I need to seek help.”
  • A news article might use this phrase to describe a suicide prevention campaign, such as “Raising Awareness to Prevent Others from Taking the Plunge.”

11. Making a permanent solution

This phrase refers to the act of taking one’s own life. It implies that the person has found a permanent solution to their problems or struggles.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was dealing with so much pain that he felt like making a permanent solution was his only option.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “It’s important to provide support and resources for those who are considering making a permanent solution.”
  • A therapist might use this phrase to ask, “Have you ever thought about making a permanent solution when you’re feeling overwhelmed?”

12. Going six feet under

This phrase is a euphemism for dying and is often used to refer to someone who has taken their own life. It alludes to the traditional burial depth of six feet.

  • For instance, a person might say, “It’s heartbreaking to hear that he went six feet under at such a young age.”
  • In a conversation about mental health awareness, someone might mention, “We need to break the stigma surrounding going six feet under and encourage open discussions.”
  • A news article might state, “The number of individuals going six feet under has been steadily increasing in recent years.”

13. Taking a leap of faith

This phrase typically refers to taking a big risk or making a major decision without knowing the outcome. In the context of slang for suicidal, it suggests taking a leap of faith by choosing to end one’s life.

  • For example, someone might say, “She was in such a dark place that she felt like taking a leap of faith was the only option.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to provide support and resources for those who are contemplating taking a leap of faith.”
  • A therapist might use this phrase to ask, “Have you ever felt like taking a leap of faith when you’re feeling overwhelmed?”

14. Choosing the eternal sleep

This phrase refers to the act of intentionally ending one’s life by suicide. It suggests that the person has chosen to enter a state of eternal rest or sleep.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was struggling with depression and made the tragic decision to choose the eternal sleep.”
  • In a conversation about mental health awareness, someone might mention, “We need to provide better resources and support for individuals who are considering choosing the eternal sleep.”
  • A news article might state, “The number of individuals choosing the eternal sleep is a concerning issue that needs to be addressed.”

15. Punching one’s own ticket

This phrase is a metaphor for committing suicide. It implies that the person is taking control of their own fate by “punching” their own ticket, as if they were boarding a train.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was dealing with so much pain that he felt like punching his own ticket was the only way out.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “It’s important to raise awareness about the signs and risk factors associated with punching one’s own ticket.”
  • A therapist might use this phrase to ask, “Have you ever had thoughts of punching your own ticket when you’re feeling overwhelmed?”

16. Taking a one-way trip

This phrase is used to describe the act of intentionally ending one’s own life. It implies that there is no return or second chance.

  • For example, someone might say, “He took a one-way trip” to refer to someone who died by suicide.
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might mention, “Taking a one-way trip is a tragic outcome of untreated depression.”
  • A news article might report, “The victim was found after taking a one-way trip off the bridge.”

17. Making a final decision

This phrase suggests that someone has made the irreversible choice to end their own life. It emphasizes the gravity and finality of the decision.

  • For instance, a therapist might say, “It’s important to intervene when someone is making a final decision.”
  • In a support group, someone might share their experience, saying, “I reached a point where I was making a final decision, but I’m glad I sought help.”
  • A mental health advocate might raise awareness by saying, “We need to create a safe environment for those who are struggling with making a final decision.”

18. Choosing the ultimate escape

This phrase implies that suicide is seen as a means of escaping or ending one’s pain and suffering. It conveys a sense of desperation and hopelessness.

  • For example, in a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “Some individuals feel like choosing the ultimate escape is the only way to end their suffering.”
  • In a book or movie, a character might contemplate their options, saying, “I’m tired of this life. Maybe choosing the ultimate escape is the answer.”
  • A mental health professional might discuss the importance of intervention, stating, “We need to offer support and resources to those who are considering choosing the ultimate escape.”

19. Riding the last train

This phrase metaphorically compares suicide to boarding a train that leads to the end. It suggests that once someone chooses this path, there is no turning back.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He rode the last train” to refer to someone who died by suicide.
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might mention, “Riding the last train is a tragic outcome of untreated depression.”
  • A news article might report, “The victim was found after riding the last train into oblivion.”

20. Taking the final bow

This phrase draws a comparison between suicide and the final bow taken by performers at the end of a show. It implies that someone is putting an end to their own existence.

  • For example, in a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “She took the final bow” to refer to someone who died by suicide.
  • In a support group, someone might share their experience, saying, “I reached a point where I felt like taking the final bow, but I’m grateful I sought help.”
  • A mental health advocate might emphasize the importance of destigmatizing suicide, saying, “We need to have open conversations about taking the final bow and provide support to those who are struggling.”

21. Making a permanent exit

This phrase refers to the act of intentionally ending one’s life, often through suicide. It implies that the individual has made the decision to permanently leave this world.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was struggling with depression for years and finally made a permanent exit.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “It’s important to recognize the signs of someone considering a permanent exit.”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities are investigating a case of a young woman who tragically made a permanent exit.”

22. Going out with a bang

This phrase suggests that an individual intends to end their life in a dramatic or attention-grabbing manner. It implies a desire to make a memorable exit.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He always wanted to go out with a bang, so he planned an elaborate farewell.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, a counselor might mention, “Sometimes, individuals who want to go out with a bang are seeking attention and may benefit from intervention.”
  • A news headline might read, “Local artist tragically goes out with a bang, leaving behind a legacy of creativity.”

23. Choosing the final solution

This phrase alludes to the concept of finding a final solution to one’s problems by choosing suicide. It suggests that the individual sees no other way out and believes that ending their life is the only solution.

  • For example, someone might say, “She felt trapped and believed choosing the final solution was the only way to escape her pain.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a therapist might mention, “Individuals who are considering the final solution often feel hopeless and overwhelmed.”
  • A news report might state, “Authorities are urging anyone struggling with thoughts of the final solution to reach out for help.”

24. Taking a deadly gamble

This phrase implies that an individual is intentionally putting their life at risk, akin to taking a dangerous gamble. It suggests that the person is willing to risk their life and potentially lose it.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was in a dark place and started taking a deadly gamble by engaging in risky behavior.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a counselor might mention, “Individuals who are taking a deadly gamble may not fully comprehend the potential consequences of their actions.”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities are concerned about the increase in young people taking a deadly gamble and are working to raise awareness.”

25. Checking into the afterlife

This phrase suggests that an individual intends to end their life in order to transition to the afterlife, believing that death will bring them to a different realm or existence.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was deeply religious and believed that checking into the afterlife was the only way to find peace.”
  • In a discussion about spirituality, a person might mention, “The belief in checking into the afterlife can be a significant factor for individuals contemplating suicide.”
  • A news report might state, “Authorities are working to address the misconception that checking into the afterlife is a solution to life’s challenges.”

26. Taking a one-way ticket

This phrase refers to the act of ending one’s own life. It implies that the person has made the decision to permanently leave this world.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been struggling for a long time, and now he’s taken a one-way ticket.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “It’s important to reach out to loved ones who might be considering taking a one-way ticket.”
  • Another person might express concern by saying, “I’m worried she’s contemplating taking a one-way ticket.”

27. Making a final departure

This phrase describes the act of intentionally causing one’s own death. It suggests that the person has made the decision to leave this world permanently.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been suffering for so long, he’s considering making a final departure.”
  • In a conversation about mental health awareness, one might discuss the importance of recognizing the signs of someone contemplating making a final departure.
  • A person expressing empathy might say, “I can’t imagine the pain someone must be in to consider making a final departure.”

28. Choosing the ultimate end

This phrase indicates the decision to intentionally bring one’s life to an end. It implies that the person has chosen to take the final step and no longer wants to continue living.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s reached a point where she’s choosing the ultimate end.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, a person might emphasize the importance of providing support and resources to those who are considering choosing the ultimate end.
  • Another person might express concern by saying, “I’m worried he’s contemplating choosing the ultimate end.”

29. Punching one’s own clock

This phrase is a metaphorical expression for the act of ending one’s own life. It suggests that the person is intentionally “punching out” or clocking out of life, similar to how an employee would clock out at the end of a workday.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been struggling with depression for years, and now he’s punched his own clock.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, one might discuss the importance of recognizing the signs of someone who might be contemplating punching their own clock.
  • A person expressing concern might say, “I’m afraid she’s getting closer to punching her own clock.”

30. Taking the final step

This phrase refers to the act of taking the last action to end one’s own life. It implies that the person has reached a point where they are ready to take the final step and no longer want to continue living.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been battling his inner demons for so long, and now he’s taken the final step.”
  • In a discussion about mental health awareness, a person might emphasize the need for early intervention and support to prevent individuals from taking the final step.
  • Another person might express concern by saying, “I’m worried she’s contemplating taking the final step.”

31. Making a permanent farewell

This phrase refers to the act of intentionally ending one’s life, indicating a desire for a permanent departure from the world. It is a euphemism used to discuss suicidal thoughts or actions without directly mentioning them.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been talking about making a permanent farewell, we need to intervene and offer support.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “It’s important to recognize the signs of someone considering a permanent farewell.”
  • A mental health advocate might emphasize, “We need to create a supportive environment where individuals feel comfortable seeking help instead of making a permanent farewell.”

32. Going on a permanent vacation

This phrase is a metaphorical expression used to refer to the act of committing suicide. It suggests a desire to permanently escape from the difficulties or challenges of life by taking a “vacation” from existence.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been struggling for so long, I’m afraid he might go on a permanent vacation.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to raise awareness and provide resources to prevent individuals from going on a permanent vacation.”
  • A mental health professional might stress, “It’s crucial to recognize the signs and intervene when someone is contemplating going on a permanent vacation.”

33. Choosing the final chapter

This phrase metaphorically refers to the act of deciding to end one’s life, suggesting that one is choosing to write the final chapter of their own story. It implies a sense of control and agency in the decision to die.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s been struggling with depression, and I’m worried she might choose the final chapter.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, a person might mention, “We need to provide support and resources for those who feel like choosing the final chapter is their only option.”
  • A mental health advocate might emphasize, “It’s important to create a society where individuals feel empowered to seek help instead of choosing the final chapter.”

34. Taking a one-way journey

This phrase is a euphemism for the act of intentionally ending one’s life. It implies a sense of finality and irreversible departure, likening suicide to embarking on a journey from which there is no return.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been feeling hopeless and talking about taking a one-way journey.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to break the stigma surrounding suicidal thoughts and provide support for those contemplating a one-way journey.”
  • A mental health professional might stress, “We must educate the public about the signs of someone considering a one-way journey and offer resources for intervention.”

35. Making a final exit

This phrase refers to the act of intentionally ending one’s life, emphasizing the idea of making a final departure from the world. It is a euphemism used to discuss suicide without directly stating it.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s been struggling for a long time, and I’m afraid she might make a final exit.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to prioritize mental health support to prevent individuals from making a final exit.”
  • A mental health advocate might emphasize, “We must promote open conversations about suicide and provide resources for those who may be considering a final exit.”

36. Choosing the ultimate escape route

This phrase refers to someone making the decision to end their life. It implies that the person sees suicide as the only way to escape their current situation or feelings.

  • For example, “He was struggling with depression and felt like choosing the ultimate escape route.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to provide support for those who are considering choosing the ultimate escape route.”
  • A therapist might ask a patient, “Have you been having thoughts about choosing the ultimate escape route?”

37. Punching one’s own timecard

This slang phrase is a euphemism for taking one’s own life. It suggests that the person is voluntarily “clocking out” of life, as if they were ending their employment.

  • For instance, “He was dealing with overwhelming emotions and felt like punching his own timecard.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might mention, “We need to raise awareness about the signs of someone punching their own timecard.”
  • A support group might discuss coping strategies for those who have thoughts of punching their own timecard.
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38. Taking the irreversible path

This phrase refers to someone choosing to end their life, emphasizing the finality and permanence of suicide. It suggests that there is no turning back once this path is taken.

  • For example, “She was struggling with unbearable pain and felt like taking the irreversible path.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, someone might mention, “We need to provide resources for those who are considering taking the irreversible path.”
  • A mental health advocate might say, “It’s important to raise awareness about the consequences of taking the irreversible path.”

39. Making a permanent departure

This phrase describes the act of intentionally ending one’s life. It implies that the person sees suicide as a way to permanently leave their current circumstances.

  • For instance, “He was dealing with deep sadness and felt like making a permanent departure.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “We need to address the underlying issues that lead to making a permanent departure.”
  • A counselor might ask a client, “Have you ever had thoughts of making a permanent departure?”

40. Going out with a permanent solution

This slang phrase refers to someone choosing suicide as a way to permanently solve their problems or end their suffering. It suggests that the person sees suicide as the final solution to their struggles.

  • For example, “She was overwhelmed with hopelessness and felt like going out with a permanent solution.”
  • In a discussion about mental health support, someone might mention, “We need to provide resources for those who are contemplating going out with a permanent solution.”
  • A mental health professional might say, “It’s important to intervene when someone expresses thoughts of going out with a permanent solution.”

41. Choosing the final curtain

This phrase refers to the act of making the decision to commit suicide. It implies that the person is choosing to bring an end to their life, similar to closing the curtains on a performance.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe he chose the final curtain. It’s such a tragic loss.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “Some individuals who are suicidal feel like they have no other option but to choose the final curtain.”
  • A therapist might use this phrase when discussing suicide prevention, saying, “It’s important to provide support and resources to individuals who are considering the final curtain.”

42. Taking the last breath

This slang phrase refers to the act of committing suicide. It implies that the person has reached a point where they feel they have no other option but to take their own life, as if it is their final breath.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was struggling with depression for years and finally took the last breath.”
  • In a conversation about mental health awareness, a person might mention, “We need to break the stigma surrounding mental illness so that individuals don’t feel like they have to take the last breath.”
  • A support hotline worker might use this phrase when discussing suicide prevention, saying, “We’re here to help individuals who are feeling like they want to take the last breath.”

43. Going on a one-way trip

This phrase refers to the act of committing suicide, suggesting that it is a journey from which there is no return. It implies that the person has made the choice to end their life and there is no coming back from it.

  • For example, someone might say, “It’s heartbreaking to hear that he went on a one-way trip.”
  • In a discussion about mental health support, a person might mention, “We need to provide resources and interventions to individuals who are contemplating going on a one-way trip.”
  • A mental health advocate might use this phrase when raising awareness about suicide prevention, saying, “No one should feel like they have to go on a one-way trip. Help is available.”

44. Doing the deed

This slang phrase refers to the act of committing suicide. It suggests that the person is taking action to carry out their plan of ending their life, often implying a sense of finality.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was struggling with his mental health for a long time and finally did the deed.”
  • In a conversation about mental health awareness, a person might mention, “We need to provide support and resources to individuals who are thinking about doing the deed.”
  • A mental health professional might use this phrase when discussing suicide prevention, saying, “It’s important to intervene and provide help to individuals who are contemplating doing the deed.”

45. Shuffling off this mortal coil

This phrase, borrowed from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, refers to the act of dying or ending one’s life. It implies a sense of resignation and acceptance of mortality.

  • For example, someone might say, “He couldn’t bear the pain anymore and decided to shuffle off this mortal coil.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to raise awareness and provide support to individuals who are feeling like they want to shuffle off this mortal coil.”
  • A mental health advocate might use this phrase when advocating for suicide prevention, saying, “No one should feel like they have to shuffle off this mortal coil alone. Reach out for help.”

46. Meeting one’s maker

This phrase is a metaphorical reference to the act of dying by suicide. It implies that the person who dies by suicide will meet their creator or higher power after death.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was so depressed, he ended up meeting his maker.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, one might mention, “Using slang terms like ‘meeting one’s maker’ can trivialize the seriousness of suicide.”
  • A person expressing concern might ask, “Has he been talking about meeting his maker? We need to intervene and offer support.”

47. Pulling the plug

This phrase is a metaphorical reference to the act of terminating one’s life, similar to pulling the plug on a machine or life support system.

  • For instance, someone might say, “She felt so hopeless that she contemplated pulling the plug.”
  • In a conversation about suicide prevention, one might emphasize, “It’s important to recognize the signs when someone is considering pulling the plug.”
  • A concerned friend might ask, “Have you noticed any signs that he’s thinking about pulling the plug? We should reach out and offer help.”

48. Opting out

This phrase is a euphemistic way of referring to the act of suicide. It suggests that the person has made a conscious decision to opt out of life.

  • For example, someone might say, “She was struggling with depression and made the tragic choice to opt out.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, one might mention, “Using terms like ‘opting out’ can mask the seriousness of suicide and prevent open conversations.”
  • A concerned family member might ask, “Has he been talking about opting out? We need to intervene and offer support.”

49. Making the ultimate decision

This phrase implies that the person has made a final and irreversible decision to end their life. It emphasizes the gravity and finality of the act of suicide.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was in such despair that he made the ultimate decision.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, one might emphasize, “We need to create a supportive environment to prevent individuals from making the ultimate decision.”
  • A concerned friend might ask, “Have you noticed any signs that she’s considering making the ultimate decision? We should offer help and support.”

50. Going to the great beyond

This phrase is a euphemistic way of referring to the act of dying, including death by suicide. It suggests that the person will transition to an unknown or spiritual realm after death.

  • For example, someone might say, “He couldn’t bear the pain anymore and chose to go to the great beyond.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, one might mention, “Using euphemistic phrases like ‘going to the great beyond’ can hinder open conversations about mental health.”
  • A concerned family member might ask, “Has she been talking about going to the great beyond? We should offer support and encourage her to seek help.”

51. Checking out of life

This phrase is used to describe the act of intentionally causing one’s own death. It implies a desire to escape from the difficulties or struggles of life.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t handle this anymore, I’m thinking of checking out of life.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “Some individuals who are struggling with depression may consider checking out of life.”
  • A friend might express concern by saying, “Please don’t keep your thoughts of checking out of life to yourself. Reach out for help.”

52. Stepping off the edge

This phrase metaphorically refers to the act of taking a step towards ending one’s own life. It suggests a sense of finality and the unknown.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I feel like I’m stepping off the edge and there’s no turning back.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might express their struggle by saying, “I’ve been teetering on the edge for a while now, and it’s scary.”
  • A concerned individual might ask, “Have you been feeling like you’re stepping off the edge lately?”

53. Ending the pain

This phrase is used to convey the desire to stop experiencing emotional or physical pain by ending one’s own life. It suggests a belief that death is the only way to find relief.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t bear the pain anymore, I’m considering ending it.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “Some individuals who are struggling with chronic pain may think about ending the pain.”
  • A concerned friend might ask, “Have you been feeling like ending the pain recently?”

54. Finding peace

This phrase refers to the belief that ending one’s own life will bring an end to suffering and grant a state of eternal peace. It implies a longing for relief from pain or distress.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just want to find peace and escape from this torment.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might express their struggle by saying, “I’ve been searching for peace, but it feels elusive.”
  • A supportive individual might say, “I hope you can find peace in other ways instead of resorting to drastic measures.”

55. Making the ultimate sacrifice

This phrase suggests that ending one’s own life is viewed as a sacrifice, often seen as a way to escape unbearable circumstances or to protect others from harm. It conveys a sense of desperation or selflessness.

  • For example, someone might say, “I feel like making the ultimate sacrifice is the only way out.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “People who are struggling may mistakenly believe that making the ultimate sacrifice is a noble act.”
  • A concerned friend might ask, “Have you been thinking about making the ultimate sacrifice? It’s important to talk to someone who can help.”

56. Suicidal ideation

Suicidal ideation refers to the thoughts or fantasies about engaging in self-harming behaviors or ending one’s own life. It is a serious mental health issue that should be taken seriously and addressed with professional help.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been struggling with suicidal ideation lately and it’s been really hard.”
  • A therapist might ask, “Have you been experiencing any suicidal ideation recently?”
  • A support group member might share, “I’ve found that talking about my suicidal ideation with others who understand has been really helpful.”

57. Self-harm

Self-harm refers to intentionally hurting oneself as a way to cope with emotional pain or distress. It is often a sign of underlying mental health issues and should be taken seriously. It is important to seek help and support for individuals engaging in self-harming behaviors.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve been struggling with self-harm as a way to cope with my emotions.”
  • A therapist might ask, “Have you engaged in any self-harm behaviors recently?”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “I’m here for you and I want to help you find healthier ways to cope instead of self-harm.”

58. End it all

“End it all” is a slang term used to refer to the act of committing suicide. It is a serious and sensitive topic that should be approached with care and empathy.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t take it anymore, I just want to end it all.”
  • A mental health professional might ask, “Have you been having thoughts of ending it all?”
  • A friend might express concern by saying, “I’m really worried about you. Please reach out for help instead of thinking about ending it all.”

59. Take a one-way trip

“Take a one-way trip” is a slang phrase used to describe the act of committing suicide. It implies that there is no return or way back from the decision to end one’s own life. It is important to approach this topic with sensitivity and provide support to those struggling.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I feel like I’ve reached my breaking point and I’m considering taking a one-way trip.”
  • A mental health professional might ask, “Have you been thinking about taking a one-way trip recently?”
  • A concerned family member might say, “I’m here for you and I want to help you find other options instead of taking a one-way trip.”

60. Check out early

“Check out early” is slang that refers to having thoughts or intentions of ending one’s life. It is a serious matter that requires attention and support from mental health professionals and loved ones.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been feeling so overwhelmed that I’ve been thinking about checking out early.”
  • A therapist might ask, “Have you had any thoughts of checking out early recently?”
  • A supportive friend might say, “I care about you and I’m here to listen if you want to talk about your thoughts of checking out early.”

61. Shuffle off this mortal coil

This phrase is a euphemism for dying or passing away. It is often used in a poetic or dramatic context to refer to the act of leaving this world.

  • For example, a writer might use this phrase in a novel to describe a character’s death, “And so he shuffled off this mortal coil, leaving behind a legacy.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might say, “We all have to shuffle off this mortal coil eventually.”
  • A person reflecting on life might ponder, “What will happen when I finally shuffle off this mortal coil?”

62. Cash in one’s chips

This phrase originated from the game of poker, where players would exchange their chips for money when they decided to leave the game. It is now commonly used as a slang term for dying or passing away.

  • For instance, a person might say, “When I cash in my chips, I want to be remembered for the life I lived.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might ask, “Have you thought about how you want to cash in your chips?”
  • A person reflecting on their own mortality might say, “I hope to accomplish everything I want before I cash in my chips.”

63. Take the big sleep

This phrase is a metaphorical way of saying to die. It originated from the detective fiction genre, where it was often used to describe a character’s death.

  • For example, a crime novel might describe a murder victim as “taking the big sleep.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might say, “We all have to take the big sleep eventually.”
  • A person reflecting on their own mortality might ponder, “What will happen to me when I finally take the big sleep?”

64. Do oneself in

This phrase is a colloquial way of saying to commit suicide. It implies that the person is responsible for their own death.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was struggling with depression and sadly decided to do himself in.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might talk about the importance of seeking help instead of doing oneself in.
  • A person reflecting on the impact of suicide might say, “It’s heartbreaking to think that someone would feel so hopeless that they would do themselves in.”

65. Go to the big adios

This phrase is a metaphorical way of saying to die. It uses the term “adios,” which is Spanish for goodbye or farewell, to imply a final departure from this world.

  • For example, in a movie about the Old West, a character might say, “He went to the big adios after a shootout with the outlaws.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might say, “When it’s my time, I hope to go to the big adios peacefully.”
  • A person reflecting on their own mortality might ponder, “What will happen to me when I finally go to the big adios?”

66. Meet one’s maker

This phrase is a euphemism for dying or experiencing death. It implies that the person is meeting their creator or facing a higher power after death.

  • For example, someone might say, “If I don’t make it out of this situation, I’ll meet my maker.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, one might comment, “We all have to meet our maker eventually.”
  • A person expressing their fear of death might say, “The thought of meeting my maker terrifies me.”

67. Off oneself

This slang phrase means to intentionally cause one’s own death. It is a colloquial and informal way to refer to the act of suicide.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe he offed himself. It’s so tragic.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, one might discuss the importance of seeking help instead of resorting to offing oneself.
  • A person expressing their frustration with life might say, “Sometimes I just want to off myself and be done with it.”

68. Pull the plug on oneself

This phrase is a metaphorical way of saying to intentionally end one’s own life. It is often used to describe the act of suicide.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was so overwhelmed with despair that he decided to pull the plug on himself.”
  • In a discussion about mental health awareness, one might emphasize the need to support those who are at risk of pulling the plug on themselves.
  • A person expressing their struggle with suicidal thoughts might say, “I feel like I’m constantly fighting the urge to pull the plug on myself.”

69. Take the last train

This slang phrase refers to the act of ending one’s own life. It implies that the person is taking the final journey or departing from this world.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He took the last train because he couldn’t bear the pain anymore.”
  • In a conversation about suicide prevention, one might discuss the importance of recognizing the signs that someone might be considering taking the last train.
  • A person expressing their despair might say, “Sometimes I feel like taking the last train is the only way to escape my suffering.”

70. End one’s own life

This phrase straightforwardly means to intentionally cause one’s own death. It is a direct and explicit way to refer to the act of suicide.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was struggling with depression and ultimately chose to end his own life.”
  • In a discussion about mental health support, one might emphasize the need to provide resources and assistance to individuals who are contemplating ending their own lives.
  • A person expressing their feelings of hopelessness might say, “I don’t see any other way out. I just want to end my own life.”

71. Doing the big sleep

This phrase is a euphemism for taking one’s own life. It refers to the act of intentionally ending one’s life through suicide.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t go on like this anymore. I’m considering doing the big sleep.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “It’s important to recognize the signs when someone is contemplating doing the big sleep.”
  • Another person might express concern by saying, “I’m worried that he’s talking about doing the big sleep. We need to intervene and offer support.”

72. Choosing to end it

This phrase refers to the act of making the decision to end one’s own life. It implies a conscious choice to take one’s own life.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’ve been struggling for so long, and I’m seriously considering choosing to end it.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might ask, “Have you ever thought about choosing to end it? It’s important to talk to someone if you’re feeling that way.”
  • A concerned friend might say, “I’ve noticed that she’s been acting differently lately. I’m worried that she might be choosing to end it.”

73. Taking the final exit

This phrase is a metaphorical way of referring to the act of committing suicide. It suggests that suicide is a way to permanently exit or leave life behind.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t handle the pain anymore. I’m considering taking the final exit.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to raise awareness about the struggles people face before they feel like taking the final exit is their only option.”
  • Another person might express empathy by saying, “I can understand why someone might feel like taking the final exit, but it’s important to offer them support and resources.”

74. Opting out of life

This phrase describes the act of deliberately deciding to remove oneself from life and all its challenges and difficulties. It suggests a desire to escape from the hardships of life through suicide.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I feel like I’ve tried everything, and now I’m seriously considering opting out of life.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might ask, “Have you ever felt like opting out of life? It’s important to reach out for help if you’re feeling that way.”
  • A concerned friend might say, “I’ve noticed that he’s been isolating himself and talking about opting out of life. We need to intervene and offer support.”

75. Choosing the last resort

This phrase suggests that suicide is seen as a last resort or final option when all other avenues of help or relief have been exhausted. It implies that suicide is chosen as a desperate measure.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve tried everything, and now I’m considering choosing the last resort.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to provide better resources and support so that people don’t feel like choosing the last resort is their only option.”
  • Another person might express concern by saying, “I’m worried that she’s reached the point of choosing the last resort. We need to offer her help and let her know she’s not alone.”

76. Making a fatal decision

This phrase refers to the act of making a decision that will result in death. It is used to describe someone who is contemplating or planning suicide.

  • For example, “She’s been struggling with depression lately, I’m worried she might be making a fatal decision.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “It’s important to reach out to loved ones who are making a fatal decision.”
  • A therapist might ask a patient, “Have you been having thoughts of making a fatal decision?”

77. Taking the ultimate step

This phrase suggests that suicide is seen as the final and irreversible action one can take. It implies that there is no turning back once this step is taken.

  • For instance, “He felt trapped and believed that taking the ultimate step was his only way out.”
  • In a support group for survivors of suicide loss, someone might share, “My brother took the ultimate step, and it has been devastating for our family.”
  • A mental health advocate might say, “We need to raise awareness and provide resources to prevent individuals from taking the ultimate step.”

78. Ending the suffering

This phrase suggests that suicide is viewed as a way to escape from emotional or psychological suffering. It implies that death is seen as a release from unbearable pain.

  • For example, “She believed that ending the suffering was the only way to find peace.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might express empathy by saying, “I understand how unbearable the pain can be, but ending the suffering is not the answer.”
  • A therapist might explore alternatives with a client by asking, “What strategies can we develop to help you cope with the suffering instead of resorting to ending your life?”

79. Choosing the final option

This phrase suggests that suicide is seen as the final choice or solution when all other options have been exhausted or deemed ineffective.

  • For instance, “He had tried multiple treatments, but in the end, he felt like choosing the final option was his only way out.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might share, “It’s important to provide support and resources to individuals who feel like they have no choice but to choose the final option.”
  • A mental health professional might say, “We need to work together to ensure that individuals struggling with their mental health never feel like choosing the final option is their only choice.”

80. Making a final escape

This phrase suggests that suicide is viewed as a way to escape from the problems and challenges of life. It implies a desire to find relief or freedom by ending one’s own life.

  • For example, “She saw making a final escape as the only way to leave behind her pain and struggles.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might express concern by saying, “It’s important to provide support and resources to individuals who are considering making a final escape.”
  • A therapist might explore the underlying reasons for wanting to make a final escape by asking, “What are the challenges and difficulties that you feel are pushing you towards this decision?”

81. Going to a better place

This phrase is often used as a euphemism for suicide, implying that the person who dies will go to a better or happier place after death.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t take this anymore. I just want to go to a better place.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “Some individuals may use the phrase ‘going to a better place’ as a way to express their desire to escape their current pain.”
  • A friend might express concern by saying, “Please don’t think that going to a better place is the solution. There are people who care about you and want to support you.”

82. Checking out for good

This phrase is slang for expressing the intention to commit suicide, suggesting that the person has made the decision to permanently leave this world.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been struggling for so long, I think I’m ready to check out for good.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might mention, “Using phrases like ‘checking out for good’ can be a sign that someone is contemplating suicide.”
  • A concerned individual might reach out and say, I noticed you’ve been talking about checking out for good. I’m here to listen and support you.
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