Top 90 Slang For Suicide – Meaning & Usage

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1. Off oneself

This phrase is a euphemism for the act of intentionally causing one’s own death. It is often used to refer to suicide in a more casual or colloquial manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe he offed himself. It’s such a tragedy.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might mention, “Sometimes people feel so hopeless that they consider offing themselves.”
  • Another person might express concern by saying, “If you’re feeling suicidal, please reach out for help instead of offing yourself.”

2. Take one’s own life

This phrase refers to the act of intentionally ending one’s own life. It is a more direct and explicit way of discussing suicide.

  • For instance, someone might say, “She took her own life after struggling with depression for years.”
  • In a discussion about mental health awareness, a person might emphasize, “It’s important to recognize the signs of someone who may be contemplating taking their own life.”
  • Another person might share their personal experience by saying, “I lost my best friend when he tragically took his own life.”

3. End it all

This phrase is a colloquial way of referring to the act of ending one’s own life. It conveys a sense of finality and desperation.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was so overwhelmed with his problems that he decided to end it all.”
  • In a conversation about mental health support, a person might advocate, “We need to create more resources for those who feel like they want to end it all.”
  • Another person might express empathy by saying, “I can’t imagine how much pain someone must be in to consider ending it all.”

4. Check out

This phrase is a slang term for the act of taking one’s own life. It implies a sense of detachment or disinterest in continuing to live.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I heard that he checked out last night. It’s so sad.”
  • In a discussion about mental health stigma, a person might argue, “We need to break down the barriers that prevent people from seeking help before they check out.”
  • Another person might express frustration by saying, “It’s heartbreaking to see how many people are checking out because they don’t have access to proper mental health support.”

5. Do oneself in

This phrase is a colloquial way of referring to the act of intentionally causing one’s own death. It can convey a sense of self-inflicted harm or destruction.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was so depressed that he decided to do himself in.”
  • In a conversation about mental health awareness, a person might stress, “We need to create a supportive environment where people don’t feel the need to do themselves in.”
  • Another person might express concern by saying, “If you ever feel like you want to do yourself in, please reach out for help instead.”

6. Kick the bucket

This slang phrase is a euphemism for dying or passing away. It is often used in a casual or humorous context.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe he kicked the bucket at such a young age.”
  • In a comedy movie, a character might joke, “If I fail this test, my parents will kick the bucket.”
  • A person discussing mortality might mention, “We never know when we’re going to kick the bucket, so we should make the most of every day.”

7. Bite the dust

This slang phrase means to die or meet one’s end. It is often used in a more dramatic or poetic context.

  • For instance, a person might say, “After a long battle with illness, he finally bit the dust.”
  • In a war movie, a soldier might say, “Some of our comrades bit the dust today.”
  • A writer might use the phrase in a poem, “In the end, we all must bite the dust.”

8. Punch one’s ticket

This slang phrase is a metaphor for committing suicide. It implies that the person is actively choosing to end their own life.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was struggling with depression and unfortunately punched his ticket.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, one might say, “It’s important to recognize the signs of someone who might be considering punching their ticket.”
  • A person advocating for suicide prevention might say, “We need to provide more support for those who feel like punching their ticket is the only option.”

9. Cash in one’s chips

This slang phrase refers to ending one’s life, often in a more casual or nonchalant manner. It equates the act of dying to cashing in poker chips.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was tired of suffering, so he decided to cash in his chips.”
  • In a discussion about euthanasia, one might say, “Some argue that individuals should have the right to cash in their chips on their own terms.”
  • A person reflecting on mortality might say, “We all know that one day we’ll have to cash in our chips, but it’s important to make the most of the time we have.”

10. Meet one’s maker

This slang phrase refers to dying and meeting one’s creator or higher power. It is often used in a religious or spiritual context.

  • For example, someone might say, “After a long battle with illness, she finally met her maker.”
  • In a discussion about the afterlife, one might say, “When we meet our maker, we’ll finally have all the answers.”
  • A person reflecting on their own mortality might say, “I wonder what it will be like when I meet my maker.”

11. Shuffle off this mortal coil

This phrase, popularized by Shakespeare, means to pass away or die. It is often used metaphorically to refer to someone’s death.

  • For example, in a eulogy, someone might say, “She has shuffled off this mortal coil and left behind a legacy.”
  • In a dark comedy, a character might joke, “If I have to listen to one more terrible pun, I might just shuffle off this mortal coil.”
  • A person discussing mortality might ponder, “What does it mean to shuffle off this mortal coil and what lies beyond?”

12. Exit stage left

This phrase originates from theater, where stage directions often indicate the movement of characters. “Exit stage left” is used metaphorically to suggest leaving a situation or life.

  • For instance, someone might say, “After a long day at work, all I want to do is exit stage left and relax.”
  • In a difficult situation, a person might declare, “I’ve had enough. It’s time to exit stage left and start fresh.”
  • A person discussing the end of a relationship might say, “Sometimes, it’s best to exit stage left and find happiness elsewhere.”

13. Go to a better place

This phrase is often used to describe someone’s death as a way to provide comfort or solace. It implies that the person who has died is now in a better or happier place.

  • For example, in a eulogy, someone might say, “We take comfort in knowing that she has gone to a better place.”
  • In a conversation about grief, a person might say, “When someone we love passes away, we hope they go to a better place and find eternal peace.”
  • A person discussing their beliefs about the afterlife might say, “I believe that when we die, we go to a better place where all our pain and suffering ends.”

14. Choose death

This phrase refers to the act of deliberately causing one’s own death. It is a straightforward and direct way to describe the action of suicide.

  • For instance, in a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to provide support and resources to those who are struggling with the choice of death.”
  • In a news report about suicide prevention, a journalist might mention, “Many individuals who choose death feel trapped and hopeless.”
  • A person advocating for mental health awareness might say, “We need to break the stigma surrounding those who choose death and provide them with the help they need.”

15. Opt for the final solution

This phrase uses the term “final solution” to refer to the act of suicide. It suggests that the person sees suicide as the only way to solve their problems or end their suffering.

  • For example, in a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to provide alternatives for those who believe that opting for the final solution is their only choice.”
  • In a conversation about the impact of mental illness, a person might mention, “Those who opt for the final solution often feel like there is no other way out.”
  • A mental health advocate might argue, “We need to raise awareness and provide support to prevent individuals from seeing suicide as the final solution.”

16. Take the easy way out

This phrase is used to refer to someone choosing suicide as a solution to their problems or difficulties. It suggests that taking one’s own life is an easier option than facing and overcoming challenges.

  • For example, someone might say, “He couldn’t handle the pressure anymore, so he decided to take the easy way out.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might comment, “We need to provide better support for those who feel like taking the easy way out.”
  • A news article might report, “The high suicide rate among teenagers suggests that many are opting to take the easy way out instead of seeking help.”

17. Give up the ghost

This phrase is a euphemism for suicide, implying that a person has given up on life and has chosen to die. It is often used in a metaphorical sense to describe someone who has lost all hope or motivation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “After losing his job and his family, he gave up the ghost.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might comment, “We should be aware of the signs that someone is considering giving up the ghost.”
  • A writer might use this phrase in a novel to convey a character’s deep despair and decision to end their life.

18. Take the plunge

This phrase is used metaphorically to refer to someone choosing to end their own life. It suggests that suicide is a decisive action, akin to jumping into deep water or taking a leap of faith.

  • For example, someone might say, “After years of struggling with depression, she finally took the plunge.”
  • In a discussion about mental health awareness, a person might comment, “We need to create a supportive environment to prevent others from taking the plunge.”
  • A news article might report, “The number of people taking the plunge has been on the rise, highlighting the need for better mental health resources.”

19. Jump off a bridge

This phrase is a literal description of someone choosing to end their own life by jumping off a bridge. It is a slang term for suicide and is often used casually or jokingly, although it can be highly offensive and insensitive.

  • For instance, someone might say, “If I fail this exam, I might as well jump off a bridge.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might comment, “Using phrases like ‘jump off a bridge’ trivializes the seriousness of suicide.”
  • A social media post might read, “Let’s spread awareness about suicide prevention and discourage phrases like ‘jump off a bridge.'”

20. Hang oneself

This phrase is a direct description of someone choosing to end their own life by hanging themselves. It is a slang term for suicide and is often used casually or jokingly, although it can be highly offensive and insensitive.

  • For example, someone might say, “If I can’t find a job soon, I might as well just hang myself.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might comment, “We should be mindful of the language we use and avoid phrases like ‘hang oneself’.”
  • A news article might report, “The use of phrases like ‘hang oneself’ in casual conversation perpetuates the stigma around mental health.”

21. Overdose

This refers to intentionally consuming a lethal amount of drugs or medication in order to end one’s life. It is a slang term often used to describe suicide by drug overdose.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He couldn’t bear the pain anymore, so he decided to overdose.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, one might mention, “Overdose is a common method of suicide among individuals struggling with addiction.”
  • A person expressing concern for a friend might ask, “Do you think they’re at risk of overdosing?”

22. Put an end to it all

This phrase is a euphemism for committing suicide. It implies the act of permanently stopping one’s existence.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can’t handle this anymore, I just want to put an end to it all.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might remark, “We need to raise awareness and provide support so that people don’t feel the need to put an end to it all.”
  • A person discussing the impact of mental illness on individuals might say, “We must address the underlying issues that lead someone to want to put an end to it all.”

23. Pull the trigger

This phrase is a metaphorical expression for committing suicide, often referring to the act of pulling the trigger on a gun. It implies taking the final step to end one’s own life.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was so depressed that he finally pulled the trigger.”
  • In a discussion about the warning signs of suicide, one might mention, “When someone starts talking about pulling the trigger, it’s crucial to take their words seriously.”
  • A person expressing concern for a loved one might ask, “Do you think they’re close to pulling the trigger?”

24. Put oneself out of one’s misery

This phrase suggests that suicide is a means to escape unbearable pain or suffering. It implies the act of taking one’s own life in order to find relief.

  • For example, someone might say, “She believed that putting herself out of her misery was the only way to find peace.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, one might remark, “We need to provide better resources and support so that people don’t feel the need to put themselves out of their misery.”
  • A person discussing the impact of untreated mental illness might say, “We must address the underlying issues that drive someone to want to put themselves out of their misery.”

25. Go six feet under

This phrase is a euphemism for dying, often used to refer to someone who has taken their own life. It implies the act of being buried in a grave, which is typically six feet deep.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He couldn’t bear the pain anymore, so he decided to go six feet under.”
  • In a discussion about the stigma surrounding suicide, one might mention, “Referring to suicide as ‘going six feet under’ minimizes the seriousness of the issue.”
  • A person expressing empathy for those who have lost someone to suicide might say, “It’s heartbreaking to think about how many people have gone six feet under due to mental health struggles.”

26. Take a dirt nap

This phrase is a euphemism for dying or being dead. It implies a permanent and final state of rest, often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “After a long day of work, all I want to do is take a dirt nap.”
  • In a humorous conversation, a person might joke, “If I have to attend another boring meeting, I might just take a dirt nap.”
  • However, it’s important to note that using this phrase in reference to suicide can be insensitive and offensive.
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27. Go out with a bang

This phrase suggests ending one’s life in a dramatic or memorable way. It implies a desire to make a lasting impact or leave a strong impression before dying.

  • For instance, someone might say, “If I ever decide to go out with a bang, I want it to be something people will never forget.”
  • In a conversation about life and death, a person might express, “I don’t want to fade away quietly. I want to go out with a bang.”
  • However, it’s important to recognize that discussing suicide in this manner can trivialize and glamorize a serious issue.

28. Say goodbye to the world

This phrase indicates the act of ending one’s life, often used metaphorically to convey a sense of finality and departure from the world.

  • For example, someone might say, “If things don’t get better soon, I might have to say goodbye to the world.”
  • In a discussion about depression and mental health, a person might express, “Sometimes, it feels like the only way out is to say goodbye to the world.”
  • However, it’s crucial to approach conversations about suicide with empathy and seek appropriate help and support.

29. Fade away

This phrase suggests the act of gradually and quietly disappearing from the world, often used metaphorically to describe ending one’s life.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I don’t want to suffer anymore. I just want to fade away.”
  • In a conversation about mental health struggles, a person might express, “Sometimes, it feels like the only way to find peace is to fade away.”
  • It’s important to approach discussions about suicide with sensitivity and encourage individuals to seek professional help and support.

30. Cease to exist

This phrase implies the act of ending one’s life, emphasizing the complete cessation of existence.

  • For example, someone might say, “When the pain becomes unbearable, it feels like the only option is to cease to exist.”
  • In a conversation about existential thoughts and despair, a person might express, “Sometimes, the idea of ceasing to exist seems more appealing than continuing to suffer.”
  • It’s crucial to approach discussions about suicide with compassion and encourage individuals to reach out for help and support.

31. Join the angels

This phrase is used to refer to someone ending their life by suicide. It implies that the person is leaving this world to join the angels in the afterlife.

  • For example, “He was struggling with depression and sadly decided to join the angels.”
  • In a conversation about suicide prevention, someone might say, “We need to reach out to those who feel like joining the angels is their only option.”
  • A person expressing their grief might write, “My heart is heavy after losing a loved one who chose to join the angels.”

32. End one’s suffering

This phrase is used to describe the act of intentionally ending one’s life in order to escape pain or suffering.

  • For instance, “She couldn’t bear the pain any longer and made the heartbreaking decision to end her suffering.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might emphasize the importance of seeking help instead of resorting to ending one’s suffering.
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I reached a point where I felt I had no other choice but to end my suffering.”

33. Escape the pain

This phrase refers to using suicide as a way to escape emotional or physical pain that feels overwhelming and unbearable.

  • For example, “He saw no other way to escape the pain and chose to end his life.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might express concern for individuals who are considering suicide as a means to escape the pain.
  • A person sharing their story might say, “I understand the desperation to escape the pain, but there are other options and support available.”

34. Find peace

This phrase is used to describe the belief that suicide can bring an end to one’s struggles and provide a sense of peace.

  • For instance, “She believed that by taking her own life, she would finally find peace.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, someone might emphasize the importance of finding alternative ways to find peace instead of resorting to suicide.
  • A person sharing their perspective might say, “I used to believe that suicide was the only way to find peace, but I’ve learned that there are other paths to healing.”

35. Give up the fight

This phrase refers to the act of giving up on life and choosing suicide as a way to end the struggle or battle one is facing.

  • For example, “He felt exhausted and decided to give up the fight by taking his own life.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might express concern for individuals who are on the verge of giving up the fight.
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I reached a point where I felt so defeated that I wanted to give up the fight, but I’m grateful I found the strength to keep going.”

36. Say goodbye

This phrase is often used as a euphemism for suicide, implying the act of intentionally causing one’s own death.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He couldn’t bear the pain anymore and decided to say goodbye.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to be aware of the signs when someone is considering saying goodbye.”
  • A news article might report, “The note found at the scene suggested that the person had chosen to say goodbye to the world.”

37. Slip away

This phrase is commonly used to describe the act of dying, including suicide. It implies a quiet or unnoticed departure from life.

  • For example, “She slipped away in the middle of the night, leaving everyone shocked.”
  • In a conversation about a tragic event, someone might say, “It’s heartbreaking to hear that he slipped away so young.”
  • A poem might use the phrase, “In the darkness of despair, he chose to slip away from this world.”

38. Fall into eternal sleep

This phrase metaphorically refers to the act of dying by suicide, suggesting a peaceful and permanent slumber.

  • For instance, “She fell into eternal sleep, escaping the pain that haunted her.”
  • In a discussion about mental health awareness, someone might say, “We need to break the stigma around those who fall into eternal sleep.”
  • A fictional story might describe a character’s final moments as, “He closed his eyes and embraced the eternal sleep that awaited him.”

39. Depart from this world

This phrase is often used to describe the act of dying, including suicide. It implies a deliberate separation from the world and all its struggles.

  • For example, “She chose to depart from this world, seeking solace in the unknown.”
  • In a conversation about loss, someone might say, “When a loved one decides to depart from this world, it leaves a void that can never be filled.”
  • A news headline might read, “Prominent artist departs from this world, leaving behind a legacy of creativity.”

40. Go to the other side

This phrase metaphorically refers to the act of dying, including suicide. It suggests a transition from the realm of the living to an unknown or spiritual realm.

  • For instance, “He couldn’t bear the pain anymore and made the decision to go to the other side.”
  • In a conversation about grief, someone might say, “When a person we love chooses to cross over to the other side, it’s natural to question why.”
  • A poem might use the phrase, “In the depths of despair, she yearned to go to the other side.”

41. Take the final step

This phrase is a euphemism for the act of intentionally ending one’s own life. It suggests that the individual has reached a point where they are ready to take the ultimate and irreversible action.

  • For example, a news article might report, “After years of battling depression, he tragically took the final step.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “We need to provide better support so that people don’t feel compelled to take the final step.”
  • A person discussing suicide prevention might emphasize, “It’s important to recognize the warning signs and intervene before someone takes the final step.”

42. Go out on one’s own terms

This phrase suggests that an individual has decided to end their life in a way that they feel is personally meaningful or dignified. It implies a desire for autonomy and control over the circumstances surrounding their death.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He didn’t want to suffer any longer, so he chose to go out on his own terms.”
  • In a discussion about end-of-life choices, a person might argue, “Everyone should have the right to go out on their own terms if they are facing unbearable suffering.”
  • A supporter of assisted dying might say, “Legalizing assisted dying allows individuals to have the option to go out on their own terms.”

43. Jump off the deep end

While this phrase is commonly used in non-suicidal contexts to describe impulsive or extreme behavior, it can also be used metaphorically to refer to someone taking their own life. It suggests that the person has reached a point of desperation or hopelessness.

  • For example, someone might say, “After losing his job and going through a divorce, he felt like he had no other choice but to jump off the deep end.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might caution, “We need to provide better support so that individuals don’t feel like they’re about to jump off the deep end.”
  • A mental health advocate might emphasize, “It’s important to recognize the signs of distress and intervene before someone feels like they’re about to jump off the deep end.”

44. Go over the edge

This phrase can be used to describe someone taking their own life when they feel they have reached a breaking point. It suggests that the person has gone beyond their emotional or psychological limits and can no longer cope.

  • For instance, a news headline might read, “After a series of setbacks, he tragically went over the edge.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to provide resources and support to prevent individuals from going over the edge.”
  • A mental health professional might stress, “Early intervention is crucial to help individuals before they go over the edge.”

45. End the pain and suffering

This phrase refers to the desire to end one’s life as a means to escape from intense emotional or physical pain. It suggests that the person sees death as the only way to find relief from their suffering.

  • For example, someone might say, “She couldn’t bear the pain any longer and chose to end the pain and suffering.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might emphasize, “We need to provide better access to mental health services so that individuals don’t feel like they have to end the pain and suffering.”
  • A mental health advocate might argue, “We must prioritize suicide prevention and support systems to help those who are struggling with the desire to end the pain and suffering.”

46. Offing

The term “offing” is a slang for suicide, referring to the act of intentionally causing one’s own death. It is often used in a casual or colloquial manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been talking about the offing lately, we should be concerned.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might mention, “I’ve struggled with thoughts of the offing in the past.”
  • Another might use it metaphorically, saying, “My dreams of becoming a musician died in the offing.”

47. Taking a dirt nap

This slang phrase refers to the act of dying or being buried in the ground. It is often used in a lighthearted or humorous manner, but can also be used more seriously.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m so tired, I feel like taking a dirt nap.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, a person might mention, “We all end up taking a dirt nap eventually.”
  • Another might use it metaphorically, saying, “My hopes and dreams took a dirt nap after that failure.”

48. Checking out

This phrase is a slang for suicide, indicating the act of intentionally ending one’s own life. It is often used informally or casually.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t handle the pain anymore, I’m thinking about checking out.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might mention, “It’s important to reach out for help if you’re feeling like checking out.”
  • Another might use it metaphorically, saying, “I’m checking out of this toxic relationship.”

49. Punching out

This phrase is a slang for suicide, suggesting the act of intentionally causing one’s own death. It is often used in a casual or colloquial manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s been struggling for a long time, I’m worried he might punch out.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to raise awareness about the signs someone is considering punching out.”
  • Another might use it metaphorically, saying, “I’m punching out of this job, it’s too stressful.”

50. Going six feet under

This slang phrase refers to the act of dying and being buried six feet underground. It is often used in a casual or colloquial manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “If I fail this exam, my parents will bury me six feet under.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, a person might mention, “We all end up going six feet under eventually.”
  • Another might use it metaphorically, saying, “My dreams of becoming an actor went six feet under after that rejection.”

51. Riding the lightning

This slang refers to the act of committing suicide by electrocution. The phrase “riding the lightning” is a metaphor for being struck by lightning, which is associated with a sudden and powerful force of nature. It is a dark and graphic way to describe taking one’s own life.

  • For example, someone might say, “He couldn’t bear the pain anymore and decided to ride the lightning.”
  • In a discussion about suicide methods, a person might mention, “Some individuals choose riding the lightning as a way to end their suffering.”
  • Another might write, “It’s important to raise awareness about the dangers of riding the lightning and provide support for those who are struggling.”

52. Doing the final dance

This slang refers to the act of committing suicide by hanging oneself. The phrase “doing the final dance” is a euphemism for ending one’s life through this method. It implies a final act or movement before death.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was tormented by his demons and chose to do the final dance.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to address the underlying issues that lead individuals to consider doing the final dance.”
  • Another might write, “It’s crucial to provide resources and support for those who may be contemplating the final dance.”

53. Taking the big sleep

This slang refers to the act of taking one’s own life. The phrase “taking the big sleep” is a euphemism for suicide, implying a permanent and eternal rest. It is a somber and metaphorical way to describe the act of ending one’s life.

  • For example, someone might say, “She couldn’t bear the pain anymore and decided to take the big sleep.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, a person might mention, “We need to raise awareness and provide support for individuals who are contemplating taking the big sleep.”
  • Another might write, “It’s important to have open conversations about mental health and destigmatize discussions about taking the big sleep.”

54. Eating a bullet

This slang refers to the act of committing suicide by shooting oneself with a firearm. The phrase “eating a bullet” is a graphic and macabre way to describe the act of ending one’s life with a gunshot. It emphasizes the finality and violence of the method.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He was overwhelmed by despair and chose to eat a bullet.”
  • In a conversation about gun control, a person might mention, “Preventing access to firearms is crucial in reducing the risk of individuals eating a bullet.”
  • Another might write, “It’s essential to provide mental health resources and support for those who may be at risk of eating a bullet.”

55. Going to the other side

This slang refers to the act of taking one’s own life. The phrase “going to the other side” is a metaphorical way to describe the transition from life to death. It implies a belief in an afterlife or another realm beyond the physical world.

  • For example, someone might say, “He felt trapped and decided to go to the other side.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, a person might mention, “We need to address the underlying factors that drive individuals to consider going to the other side.”
  • Another might write, “It’s important to provide support and resources for those who may be struggling and contemplating going to the other side.”

56. Meeting the reaper

This phrase refers to the act of dying, often implying a deliberate or intentional action. It metaphorically suggests that the person is meeting the personification of death, known as the reaper.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He chose to meet the reaper rather than continue suffering.”
  • In a dark joke, someone might comment, “If I fail this exam, I might as well meet the reaper.”
  • A person discussing the topic might ask, “Why do some individuals feel compelled to meet the reaper?”

57. Taking the last train

This phrase is a metaphorical way of referring to the act of committing suicide. It suggests that the person is choosing to take the final journey or departure from life, similar to taking the last train to a destination.

  • For example, a person might say, “He unfortunately decided to take the last train.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might mention, “We need to raise awareness to prevent individuals from taking the last train.”
  • A person expressing concern might ask, “How can we identify signs that someone is considering taking the last train?”

58. Jumping off the deep end

This phrase is a metaphorical expression for ending one’s life, often used to describe a sudden and drastic decision to commit suicide. It implies taking a leap into the unknown, similar to jumping off the deep end of a pool.

  • For instance, someone might say, “She couldn’t handle the pain anymore and decided to jump off the deep end.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might comment, “We should provide support to individuals before they feel like jumping off the deep end.”
  • A person expressing concern might ask, “What can we do as a society to prevent individuals from jumping off the deep end?”

59. Swallowing the blue pill

This phrase is a metaphorical way of referring to the act of ending one’s life, often used to describe a deliberate choice to commit suicide. It alludes to the concept of taking a fictional blue pill in the movie “The Matrix,” which leads to death.

  • For example, someone might say, “After facing constant rejection, he chose to swallow the blue pill.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might mention, “We need to address the underlying issues that make individuals contemplate swallowing the blue pill.”
  • A person expressing concern might ask, “What can we do to support individuals who are feeling tempted to swallow the blue pill?”

60. Checking into the eternal sleep

This phrase is a euphemistic way of referring to the act of committing suicide. It suggests that the person is voluntarily entering a permanent state of slumber or rest, often implying a desire to escape from pain or suffering.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He tragically checked into the eternal sleep.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might comment, “We should strive to provide better resources to prevent individuals from checking into the eternal sleep.”
  • A person expressing concern might ask, “What are some warning signs that someone might be considering checking into the eternal sleep?”

61. Dancing with the devil

This phrase is used to describe someone who is actively participating in actions that are harmful to themselves and may lead to their demise.

  • For example, “He’s been dancing with the devil for years, constantly getting involved in dangerous situations.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, someone might say, “Addicts often find themselves dancing with the devil, unable to break free from their destructive habits.”
  • A therapist might use this phrase to describe a client’s risky behaviors, saying, “It seems like you’ve been dancing with the devil lately, engaging in behaviors that put your life at risk.”

62. Taking the final leap

This phrase is a metaphorical way of referring to someone ending their life by jumping from a high place.

  • For instance, “He was so overwhelmed by his problems that he decided to take the final leap.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might mention, “We must provide support to those who feel like taking the final leap.”
  • A news article about suicide prevention might use this phrase in the headline, saying, “Understanding the mindset of those contemplating the final leap.”

63. Going to the great beyond

This phrase is a euphemism for dying or passing away, often used to refer to someone who has died by suicide.

  • For example, “She tragically went to the great beyond far too soon.”
  • In a conversation about loss, someone might say, “My heart goes out to those left behind when a loved one goes to the great beyond.”
  • A eulogy for someone who died by suicide might mention, “Even though he’s gone to the great beyond, his memory will live on in our hearts.”

64. Embracing the darkness

This phrase describes the act of accepting or welcoming death as an alternative to continuing to live.

  • For instance, “In his darkest moments, he considered embracing the darkness.”
  • In a discussion about mental illness, someone might say, “People who are struggling may feel like they have no choice but to embrace the darkness.”
  • A therapist might use this phrase to understand a client’s mindset, saying, “It sounds like you’re contemplating embracing the darkness as a way out of your pain.”

65. Making the final exit

This phrase refers to someone intentionally ending their life, making a permanent departure from the world.

  • For example, “She made the final exit after years of battling depression.”
  • In a conversation about suicide prevention, someone might say, “We must work together to help those who are considering making the final exit.”
  • A mental health advocate might use this phrase to raise awareness, saying, “Let’s break the stigma surrounding mental health so that fewer people feel like making the final exit is their only option.”

66. Slipping into eternal silence

This phrase refers to the act of ending one’s own life, often through suicide. It suggests a peaceful and permanent silence that comes after death.

  • For example, a person might write in a suicide note, “I can no longer bear the pain, so I am slipping into eternal silence.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to raise awareness and provide support to prevent people from slipping into eternal silence.”
  • A news article might report, “Tragically, another individual slipped into eternal silence yesterday.”

67. Taking the permanent vacation

This slang phrase equates suicide to taking a permanent vacation, suggesting that death is a way to escape from life’s difficulties or problems.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He couldn’t handle the stress anymore, so he decided to take the permanent vacation.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might mention, “We need to address the underlying issues that lead individuals to consider taking the permanent vacation.”
  • A news headline might read, “Famous author tragically takes the permanent vacation.”

68. Riding the last train

This phrase metaphorically compares suicide to riding a train to the end of the line, implying that death is the final destination.

  • For example, a person might write, “I’ve made up my mind, and tonight I’ll be riding the last train.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, someone might say, “We need to reach out to those who feel like they’re riding the last train and offer them support.”
  • A news report might state, “Another life tragically ended as the individual rode the last train.”

69. Jumping the great divide

This slang phrase suggests that suicide is like jumping over a great divide, representing a significant and irreversible action.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He felt like he had no other choice but to jump the great divide.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, a person might comment, “We need to provide resources and interventions to prevent individuals from jumping the great divide.”
  • A news article might report, “A young person’s life was lost as they tragically jumped the great divide.”

70. Taking the final bow

This phrase compares suicide to taking a final bow, implying that death is the last act or performance in one’s life.

  • For example, a person might write, “I’ve decided it’s time for me to take the final bow.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, someone might say, “We need to educate people on the warning signs and risk factors associated with taking the final bow.”
  • A news headline might read, “Promising young actor tragically takes the final bow.”

71. Embracing the eternal slumber

This phrase refers to the act of intentionally ending one’s own life. It suggests a peaceful and eternal rest, but it is important to remember that suicide is a serious and tragic event with lasting consequences.

  • For example, “After years of struggling with depression, he decided to embrace the eternal slumber.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to raise awareness and support for those who are contemplating embracing the eternal slumber.”
  • It is crucial to approach this topic with sensitivity and understanding, as it is a deeply personal and complex issue.
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72. Going into the black

This phrase is used to describe the act of intentionally ending one’s own life. It conveys a sense of entering a state of darkness or nothingness.

  • For instance, “He felt overwhelmed by his problems and made the tragic decision to go into the black.”
  • In a conversation about suicide prevention, someone might say, “We need to provide better support systems for individuals who are considering going into the black.”
  • It is important to address mental health and provide resources to those who may be struggling with thoughts of choosing death.

73. Taking the final curtain call

This phrase is a metaphorical expression for suicide, comparing it to the final act of a theatrical performance where the curtains close. It suggests that the person has reached the end of their story.

  • For example, “She was dealing with unbearable pain and decided to take the final curtain call.”
  • In a discussion about mental health awareness, someone might say, “We need to break the stigma surrounding suicide and provide support for those who are considering taking the final curtain call.”
  • It is crucial to approach this topic with empathy and understanding, as individuals who are contemplating ending their own lives may be experiencing immense pain and suffering.

74. Checking out for good

This phrase refers to the act of intentionally ending one’s own life. It suggests a permanent departure from life and is often used informally, but it is important to recognize the seriousness and gravity of the topic.

  • For instance, “He felt trapped and decided to check out for good.”
  • In a conversation about suicide prevention, someone might say, “We need to raise awareness and provide resources for individuals who are contemplating checking out for good.”
  • It is crucial to approach this topic with sensitivity and compassion, as individuals who are considering ending their own lives may be in need of support and understanding.
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75. Stepping into the void

This phrase is used to describe the act of intentionally ending one’s own life. It conveys a sense of entering into emptiness or nothingness, suggesting a permanent absence.

  • For example, “She felt like there was no way out and made the heartbreaking decision to step into the void.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to address the underlying issues that lead individuals to consider stepping into the void.”
  • It is important to approach this topic with empathy and provide resources for those who may be struggling with thoughts of taking their own lives.

76. Making the final departure

This phrase refers to the act of intentionally ending one’s own life. It implies a permanent departure from the world.

  • For example, “He made the final departure last night, leaving behind a note.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to raise awareness about the reasons behind making the final departure.”
  • A news article might report, “The police are investigating a case of a young person making the final departure.”

77. Going into the great unknown

This phrase suggests that suicide is a way to transition into the unknown realm of the afterlife. It expresses a belief in an existence beyond death.

  • For instance, “She couldn’t bear the pain anymore, so she chose to go into the great unknown.”
  • In a conversation about grief, someone might say, “Losing a loved one to suicide feels like they’ve gone into the great unknown.”
  • A poem about suicide might include the line, “In the darkness, he found solace, going into the great unknown.”

78. Taking the ultimate escape

This phrase implies that suicide is a means of escaping the difficulties and challenges of life. It suggests that death is the ultimate form of relief.

  • For example, “He saw no other way out and believed that taking the ultimate escape was his only option.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to provide better support so that people don’t feel compelled to take the ultimate escape.”
  • A therapist might explain, “Suicidal thoughts often arise from a desire for the ultimate escape from emotional pain.”

79. Kicking the bucket

This phrase is a euphemism for dying, often used in a lighthearted or casual manner. It can also be used to refer specifically to suicide.

  • For instance, “He had been struggling for a long time, and unfortunately, he ended up kicking the bucket.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might joke, “Well, we’re all going to kick the bucket someday, but hopefully not anytime soon!”
  • A comedian might use the phrase in a dark humor routine, saying, “I’ve had such a terrible week that I’m considering kicking the bucket.”

80. Doing the deed

This phrase is a euphemism for suicide, often used to refer to the act itself without explicitly mentioning suicide.

  • For example, “He was in such a dark place that he contemplated doing the deed.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to create a supportive environment where people feel comfortable talking about doing the deed.”
  • A therapist might ask a patient, “Have you ever had thoughts of doing the deed?”

81. Shuffling off this mortal coil

This phrase, taken from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, refers to the act of dying. It is often used metaphorically to describe someone taking their own life.

  • For example, a person might say, “After facing years of depression, he decided to shuffle off this mortal coil.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might comment, “We all have to shuffle off this mortal coil eventually, but suicide shouldn’t be the answer.”
  • Another might use the phrase to express frustration, saying, “Sometimes I feel like shuffling off this mortal coil, but I know there’s still hope.”

82. Taking the plunge

This phrase implies taking a bold or risky action, often used metaphorically to describe someone ending their own life.

  • For instance, a person might say, “After years of struggling with mental illness, she finally took the plunge.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, someone might comment, “We need to provide support for those who are considering taking the plunge.”
  • Another might use the phrase to express empathy, saying, “I understand the feeling of wanting to take the plunge, but there are people who care and can help.”

83. Jumping ship

This phrase, originally used to describe someone abandoning a sinking ship, is often used metaphorically to describe someone ending their own life.

  • For example, a person might say, “After losing everything, he decided to jump ship.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might comment, “We need to create a supportive environment to prevent people from jumping ship.”
  • Another might use the phrase to express concern, saying, “I’m worried that my friend might be thinking about jumping ship.”

84. Taking the final exit

This phrase refers to the act of ending one’s own life. It implies a deliberate and final decision to exit this world.

  • For instance, a person might say, “She was in so much pain that she felt taking the final exit was the only option.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, someone might comment, “We need to raise awareness and provide resources for those who are considering taking the final exit.”
  • Another might use the phrase to express sadness, saying, “It’s heartbreaking to think that someone would choose to take the final exit.”

85. Going out with a bang

This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe someone ending their own life in a dramatic or attention-seeking manner.

  • For example, a person might say, “He always wanted to make a statement, so he decided to go out with a bang.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might comment, “We need to address the underlying issues that lead people to want to go out with a bang.”
  • Another might use the phrase to express frustration, saying, “It’s frustrating that society often glamorizes going out with a bang instead of providing support for those in need.”

86. Pulling the trigger

This phrase refers to the act of using a firearm to take one’s own life. It is a metaphorical expression that signifies the final and irreversible decision to end one’s life.

  • For example, “He was in such despair that he resorted to pulling the trigger.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might say, “We need to provide support to those who are contemplating pulling the trigger.”
  • A news article might report, “The victim was found dead after allegedly pulling the trigger.”

87. Ending it all

This phrase is a euphemism for the act of committing suicide. It implies a sense of finality and hopelessness, suggesting that the person sees no other way out of their pain or suffering.

  • For instance, “She couldn’t bear the pain anymore and decided to end it all.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “We need to raise awareness about the signs of someone considering ending it all.”
  • A therapist might discuss the importance of early intervention, saying, “We want to help individuals before they reach the point of wanting to end it all.”

88. Swallowing the pill

This phrase metaphorically refers to the act of ingesting a large amount of medication with the intention of causing one’s own death. It suggests a deliberate and calculated decision to end one’s life by self-administering a fatal dose of drugs.

  • For example, “He left a note explaining that he couldn’t bear the pain anymore and was considering swallowing the pill.”
  • In a discussion about mental health treatments, someone might mention the risk of individuals resorting to swallowing the pill if not provided with appropriate support.
  • A news report might state, “Authorities are investigating a case of suspected suicide where the victim was found deceased after allegedly swallowing the pill.”

89. Falling off the edge

This phrase figuratively describes the act of jumping from a high place, such as a building or a bridge, with the intention of ending one’s life. It conveys a sense of desperation and hopelessness, as if the person has reached a point where they can no longer bear their pain or suffering.

  • For instance, “He had been struggling with depression for years and finally fell off the edge.”
  • In a discussion about suicide prevention, someone might say, “We need to provide resources for individuals who feel like they are falling off the edge.”
  • A news headline might read, “Local authorities install barriers on bridge to prevent individuals from falling off the edge.”

90. Making a permanent solution

This phrase refers to the act of selecting a method of suicide that is believed to be irreversible and certain to cause death. It implies a deliberate and conscious decision to end one’s life, often as a result of overwhelming pain or hopelessness.

  • For example, “She had been contemplating suicide for a while and finally made a permanent solution.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “We need to address the underlying issues that lead individuals to consider making a permanent solution.”
  • A mental health advocate might emphasize the importance of early intervention, stating, “We want to provide support and resources to individuals before they reach the point of making a permanent solution.”