Top 20 Slang For Work On – Meaning & Usage

In the fast-paced world of work, staying up to date with the latest lingo can help you navigate the office with ease. From boardroom meetings to water cooler chats, having a handle on the slang for work on can give you an edge in the corporate world. Let us guide you through some of the most common and trendy phrases that will make you sound like a pro in no time. Get ready to level up your workplace communication game with our curated list!

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1. Dive into

To fully commit to and start working on a task or project with enthusiasm and focus.

  • For example, “I need to dive into this report and finish it by tomorrow.”
  • A coworker might say, “I’m going to dive into this coding project and see if I can find a solution.”
  • A manager might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s dive into this new initiative and make it a success.”

2. Plow through

To work through something, such as a task or a pile of work, quickly and efficiently, often with determination and perseverance.

  • For instance, “I need to plow through these emails before the end of the day.”
  • A student might say, “I have a lot of reading to plow through for this assignment.”
  • A coworker might offer advice, “If you want to finish this project on time, you’ll need to plow through the remaining tasks.”

3. Knuckle down

To concentrate and work hard on a task or project, often with a sense of determination and discipline.

  • For example, “I need to knuckle down and finish this presentation before the meeting.”
  • A team leader might say, “We have a tight deadline, so let’s knuckle down and get this project done.”
  • A coworker might encourage their colleague by saying, “You can do it! Just knuckle down and give it your best.”

4. Put in the hours

To dedicate a substantial amount of time and effort to working on a task or project.

  • For instance, “I’ve been putting in the hours to meet this deadline.”
  • A freelancer might say, “To succeed in this industry, you have to put in the hours.”
  • A manager might acknowledge their team’s hard work by saying, “I appreciate everyone putting in the hours to complete this project.”

5. Get cracking

To begin working on a task or project promptly and with enthusiasm.

  • For example, “We have a lot to do, so let’s get cracking.”
  • A team leader might say, “Time is of the essence, so let’s get cracking on this assignment.”
  • A coworker might motivate their colleague by saying, “Come on, let’s get cracking and finish this project ahead of schedule.”

6. Put your nose to the grindstone

This phrase means to work with dedication and focus, often for a long period of time. It refers to the act of putting your face close to a grindstone, which is a stone wheel used for sharpening tools.

  • For example, a boss might say to an employee, “We have a tight deadline, so put your nose to the grindstone and get it done.”
  • A student preparing for exams might tell themselves, “It’s time to put my nose to the grindstone and study.”
  • In a motivational speech, a speaker might say, “Success requires putting your nose to the grindstone and giving it your all.”

7. Get to work

This phrase is a straightforward way of telling someone to start working or to begin a task. It implies that there is no time to waste and that it’s time to get started.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say to an employee, “Stop chatting and get to work.”
  • A coach might say to their team, “The game starts in 10 minutes, so get to work and warm up.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “You have homework to do, so get to work and finish it before dinner.”

8. Apply elbow grease

This phrase means to put in physical effort and work hard, often for a task that requires manual labor. It suggests using your muscles and strength to get the job done.

  • For example, a handyman might say, “To remove this stubborn stain, you’ll need to apply some elbow grease.”
  • A person cleaning their house might say, “I need to apply some elbow grease to scrub these floors.”
  • In a conversation about renovating a house, someone might say, “The project will require a lot of elbow grease, but it will be worth it in the end.”

9. Get on with it

This phrase is used to urge someone to proceed or continue with a task without delay. It implies that there is no need to waste time or procrastinate.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say to an employee, “Stop overthinking and get on with it.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “You’ve been staring at the question for a while, so get on with it and start writing.”
  • In a group project, a team member might say, “We need to finish this presentation, so let’s get on with it and start working.”

10. Work like a dog

This phrase means to work with great effort and dedication, often for long hours and without rest. It compares the intensity of work to the hard work and determination exhibited by dogs.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “She’s been working like a dog to meet the deadline.”
  • A coach might say to their team, “If you want to win the championship, you need to work like dogs in practice.”
  • A friend might say to another friend, “I’ve been working like a dog lately, but it will all be worth it in the end.”

11. Clock in

To start working or to officially record the start of one’s shift. “Clock in” is often used in the context of hourly or shift-based jobs where employees need to record their working hours.

  • For example, an employee might say, “I need to clock in before I start my shift.”
  • A supervisor might remind their team, “Don’t forget to clock in when you arrive.”
  • In a conversation about work schedules, someone might ask, “What time do you usually clock in?”

12. Put in work

To exert effort and dedicate oneself to completing a task or achieving a goal. “Put in work” implies a strong work ethic and a willingness to go above and beyond.

  • For instance, a coach might motivate their team by saying, “We need to put in work if we want to win this game.”
  • A coworker might compliment a colleague by saying, “You really put in work on that project.”
  • In a discussion about personal development, someone might advise, “If you want to succeed, you have to put in the work.”

13. Dive in

To begin a task or activity with enthusiasm and energy. “Dive in” implies a willingness to fully engage and immerse oneself in the work at hand.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “Let’s not waste any time, let’s dive in and get started.”
  • A coworker might encourage their colleague by saying, “Go ahead and dive in, I’ll be right behind you.”
  • In a conversation about tackling a challenging project, someone might suggest, “We need to dive in headfirst and give it our all.”

14. Get on it

To begin working on a task or assignment promptly. “Get on it” emphasizes the need for immediate action and a sense of urgency.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “We have a tight deadline, so let’s get on it.”
  • A coworker might remind their colleague, “Don’t forget to get on it as soon as you can.”
  • In a discussion about prioritizing tasks, someone might advise, “If it’s urgent, get on it right away.”

15. Get to it

To start working on a task or assignment. “Get to it” implies a sense of readiness and the need to begin without delay.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “We have a lot to accomplish today, so let’s get to it.”
  • A coworker might encourage their teammate by saying, “Stop procrastinating and get to it.”
  • In a conversation about time management, someone might suggest, “Instead of wasting time, let’s get to it and make progress.”

16. Get on the ball

This phrase is used to encourage someone to start working or to become more focused and productive in their tasks.

  • For example, a manager might say to an employee, “It’s time to get on the ball and finish that project.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s get on the ball and give it our all in the next game.”
  • A friend might remind someone to get on the ball with their studies by saying, “You have an exam tomorrow, so it’s time to get on the ball and start studying.”

17. Hammer out

This phrase is used to describe the process of working through or resolving a problem or issue through discussion, negotiation, or hard work.

  • For instance, a group of colleagues might need to hammer out the details of a project plan.
  • In a business meeting, participants might have to hammer out a compromise on a contentious issue.
  • A couple might need to hammer out their differences in order to improve their relationship.
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18. Plug away

This phrase is used to describe the act of continuing to work diligently and persistently, especially when faced with challenges or setbacks.

  • For example, a writer might need to plug away at their novel to meet a deadline.
  • An entrepreneur might have to plug away at their business venture despite initial difficulties.
  • A student might need to plug away at their studies to improve their grades.

19. Nose to the grindstone

This phrase is used to describe the act of working hard and diligently, often with a focus on completing a task or achieving a goal.

  • For instance, a manager might encourage their team to keep their nose to the grindstone to meet a tight deadline.
  • A student might need to keep their nose to the grindstone in order to excel academically.
  • A person starting a new business might have to keep their nose to the grindstone to establish a strong foundation.

20. Get down to work

This phrase is used to encourage someone to start working or to become more focused on a task at hand.

  • For example, a teacher might say to their students, “It’s time to get down to work and start the assignment.”
  • A supervisor might remind their employees, “Let’s get down to work and meet our production targets.”
  • A friend might encourage someone to get down to work on their fitness goals by saying, “It’s time to hit the gym and get down to work.”