Top 22 Slang For Told – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to conveying a message, sometimes the standard “told” just doesn’t cut it. That’s where alternative slang terms for “told” come into play, adding flair and creativity to your everyday conversations. Join us as we unveil a list of trendy and entertaining ways to spice up your language game and keep your friends on their toes with your linguistic prowess. Get ready to level up your communication skills with these fresh expressions for getting your point across!

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1. Spilled the tea

This phrase is often used to describe someone sharing juicy or scandalous details.

  • For example, “She spilled the tea about what really happened at the party.”
  • A friend might say, “Girl, you need to spill the tea on that date you went on last night!”
  • In a celebrity gossip discussion, someone might comment, “I can’t wait for this celebrity to spill the tea on their new project.”

2. Dished

This term is used to describe someone sharing news or information, often in a casual or gossipy manner.

  • For instance, “She dished about her coworker’s secret crush.”
  • A friend might say, “I heard you dished about what happened at the party last night!”
  • In a conversation about celebrity scandals, someone might ask, “Who’s dishing the latest gossip on that actor?”

3. Let the cat out of the bag

This phrase means to accidentally reveal information that was meant to be kept secret.

  • For example, “He let the cat out of the bag about the surprise party.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t believe you let the cat out of the bag about our vacation plans!”
  • In a discussion about office politics, someone might comment, “I hope no one lets the cat out of the bag about the upcoming layoffs.”

4. Spilled the beans

This phrase is used to describe someone intentionally or accidentally revealing information that was meant to be kept secret.

  • For instance, “He spilled the beans about their relationship.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t believe you spilled the beans about our surprise party!”
  • In a conversation about a TV show’s plot twist, someone might comment, “I can’t wait for the character to spill the beans about what they know.”

5. Let it slip

This phrase means to accidentally reveal information that was meant to be kept secret or unknown.

  • For example, “She let it slip that they were planning a surprise.”
  • A friend might say, “You really let it slip that you were going to propose!”
  • In a discussion about a movie’s twist ending, someone might comment, “I hope no one lets it slip before I see it.”

6. Let the news out

This phrase means to share or disclose information that was previously unknown or secret. It implies that someone has made information public or known to others.

  • For example, “She let the news out about their engagement before they had a chance to tell everyone.”
  • In a gossip-filled conversation, someone might say, “I can’t believe she let the news out about their breakup.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Don’t let the news out about my surprise party!”

7. Gave the scoop

This phrase means to provide exclusive or inside information on a particular topic or event. It implies that someone has shared details or knowledge that others may not be aware of.

  • For instance, “He gave the scoop on the upcoming product launch.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “I heard she gave the scoop on what really happened.”
  • A journalist might write, “Sources close to the investigation gave the scoop on the latest developments.”

8. Tattled

This slang term refers to the act of informing on someone or reporting their misbehavior to an authority figure. It often carries a negative connotation and implies that the person who tattled is seen as betraying trust or breaking a code of silence.

  • For example, “He tattled on his classmates for cheating on the test.”
  • In a school setting, a student might say, “I can’t believe she tattled on us for skipping class.”
  • A parent might scold their child, “Don’t be a tattletale and go running to me every time your sibling does something wrong.”

9. Let the secret out

This phrase means to reveal or share information that was meant to be kept confidential or hidden. It implies that someone has unintentionally or intentionally made a secret known to others.

  • For instance, “She let the secret out about the surprise party.”
  • In a conversation about a hidden relationship, someone might say, “I can’t believe he let the secret out about them.”
  • A friend might playfully say, “You better not let the secret out about my crush!”

10. Spilled the juice

This slang phrase means to reveal or disclose exciting, interesting, or scandalous information. It implies that someone has shared gossip or details that are particularly intriguing or captivating.

  • For example, “She spilled the juice about their secret vacation.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “I heard she spilled the juice on what really happened.”
  • A friend might say, “Come on, spill the juice! I want to hear all the details about your date last night!”

11. Let the story out

This phrase means to disclose or make public information or a secret that was previously unknown or kept hidden.

  • For example, “She finally let the story out about what happened that night.”
  • In a discussion about a scandal, someone might say, “The whistleblower decided to let the story out and expose the corruption.”
  • A friend might encourage another to share, “Come on, let the story out! We’re all here to support you.”

12. Gave the deets

This slang phrase means to give or provide detailed information about something.

  • For instance, “She gave me the deets on the party happening this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about a new job, someone might ask, “Can you give me the deets on the salary and benefits?”
  • A friend might say, “I need the deets on what happened last night. Don’t leave out any juicy details!”

13. Snuck

This term refers to the act of informing or telling someone something in a secretive or sneaky manner.

  • For example, “She snuck me the answer to the test during the exam.”
  • In a discussion about a surprise party, someone might say, “We need to figure out how to invite her without her knowing. Can you sneak her the details?”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Hey, can you sneak me the gossip? I promise I won’t tell anyone!”

14. Put on blast

This slang phrase means to publicly reveal or expose someone or something, often in a negative or critical way.

  • For instance, “She put her ex-boyfriend on blast by sharing their private text messages.”
  • In a discussion about a scandalous situation, someone might say, “The media put the politician on blast for his unethical behavior.”
  • A friend might warn another, “Be careful what you say online. People can easily put you on blast.”

15. Blew the cover

This phrase means to reveal or expose someone’s true identity or secret, often unintentionally or without their consent.

  • For example, “The detective blew the cover of the undercover agent during the operation.”
  • In a discussion about a surprise party, someone might accidentally say, “I hope we don’t blow the cover and ruin the surprise.”
  • A friend might say, “Don’t mention my name. I’m trying to keep a low profile and not blow my cover.”

16. Snapped

This slang term refers to someone being informed or told something suddenly or abruptly. It can also imply a sense of being caught off guard or surprised by the information.

  • For example, “She snapped at me and told me the bad news.”
  • In a conversation about a surprise party, someone might say, “I snapped and told her about the surprise before realizing my mistake.”
  • A friend might say, “I snapped and told him about the surprise trip we planned for his birthday.”

17. Clued in

To be “clued in” means to be informed or given information about something. It implies being brought up to date or made aware of a particular situation or knowledge.

  • For instance, “He clued me in on the latest gossip.”
  • In a discussion about a secret plan, someone might say, “I’ll clue you in on the details later.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you clue me in on what happened last night? I heard there was drama.”

18. Gave the heads up

To “give the heads up” means to provide a warning or advance notice to someone. It implies letting someone know about something that they may need to be aware of or prepared for.

  • For example, “He gave me the heads up about the upcoming changes in the office.”
  • In a conversation about a surprise visit, someone might say, “I gave her the heads up so she could clean up before the guests arrived.”
  • A team member might say, “I’ll give you the heads up if there are any last-minute changes to the schedule.”

19. Gave the 411

To “give the 411” means to provide information or details about something. It originates from the telephone number for directory assistance in the United States, which used to be 411.

  • For instance, “She gave me the 411 on the upcoming event.”
  • In a discussion about a new restaurant, someone might say, “Give me the 411 on the food and atmosphere.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me the 411 on what happened at the party last night?”

20. Let the cat out of the box

To “let the cat out of the box” means to reveal a secret or confidential information that was not supposed to be disclosed. It implies accidentally or intentionally sharing information that was meant to be kept hidden or private.

  • For example, “He let the cat out of the box and told everyone about the surprise party.”
  • In a conversation about a surprise gift, someone might say, “Don’t let the cat out of the box and spoil the surprise.”
  • A friend might admit, “I accidentally let the cat out of the box and told her about the surprise vacation we planned.”

21. Gave the inside scoop

This phrase means to provide someone with inside or exclusive information about a particular topic or situation. It implies that the person has access to information that is not widely known or readily available.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I gave the inside scoop on the latest scandal.”
  • A friend might tell you, “I can give you the inside scoop on the upcoming party.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “I gave the inside scoop on the new product launch to my team.”

22. Let the cat out of the cage

This phrase means to accidentally or intentionally reveal a secret or confidential information that was meant to be kept hidden or private. It suggests that someone has disclosed information that was not supposed to be known by others.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Oops, I let the cat out of the cage and told everyone about the surprise party.”
  • A coworker might confess, “I let the cat out of the cage and revealed our company’s upcoming merger.”
  • In a family setting, someone might say, “My sister let the cat out of the cage and told our parents about my surprise gift.”
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