Top 30 Slang For Surfboard – Meaning & Usage

Surfing, with its cool vibes and laid-back culture, has brought about its own set of slang terms, including some creative ones for the surfboard. Whether you’re a seasoned surfer or just getting started, our team has got you covered with a list of the top slang words for surfboard. Get ready to ride the waves with style and impress your fellow surfers with your knowledge of this unique lingo!

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1. Stick

This term refers to a surfboard, which is a long, narrow board used for riding waves. It is called a “stick” because of its resemblance to a stick or pole.

  • For example, a surfer might say, “I’m going to grab my stick and hit the waves.”
  • In a conversation about surfing, someone might ask, “Do you prefer riding a short stick or a long stick?”
  • A beginner surfer might say, “I just bought my first stick and I can’t wait to try it out.”

2. Board

“Board” is a general term used to refer to a surfboard. It is a simple and commonly used slang term for the equipment used in surfing.

  • For instance, a surfer might say, “I need to wax my board before I go out.”
  • In a discussion about surfboard shapes, someone might ask, “What type of board do you prefer for big waves?”
  • A person might comment, “I just got a new board and it’s so much lighter than my old one.”

3. Shred sled

This term is a slang phrase used to describe a surfboard. It emphasizes the idea of riding waves and “shredding” them, similar to how a sled is used for sliding down a hill.

  • For example, a surfer might say, “I can’t wait to take my shred sled out in the morning.”
  • In a conversation about surfing, someone might ask, “What’s your favorite type of shred sled?”
  • A person might comment, “I just got a new shred sled and it’s so fast!”

4. Wave rider

This term refers to a surfboard and highlights its purpose of riding waves. It emphasizes the connection between the surfer and the wave, as the surfboard is the tool that allows the rider to navigate and enjoy the waves.

  • For instance, a surfer might say, “I’m a dedicated wave rider, always searching for the perfect wave.”
  • In a discussion about surfing techniques, someone might ask, “What’s the key to becoming a better wave rider?”
  • A person might comment, “I love the feeling of being a wave rider, it’s like being one with the ocean.”

5. Foamie

This term refers to a specific type of surfboard made out of foam. Foamies are often used by beginners or surf schools due to their buoyancy and soft construction, which makes them safer and more forgiving for learning.

  • For example, a surfer might say, “I’m bringing my foamie to the beach today for some fun.”
  • In a conversation about surfboard materials, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried riding a foamie?”
  • A person might comment, “Foamies are great for beginners because they’re easier to balance on.”

6. Log

A longboard is a type of surfboard that is longer and wider than a standard shortboard. The term “log” is slang for a longboard due to its resemblance to a log in shape and size.

  • For example, a surfer might say, “I’m taking out my log today because the waves are small.”
  • In a conversation about different surfboard types, someone might ask, “Do you prefer riding a log or a shortboard?”
  • A surfboard shaper might advertise, “Custom-made logs for smooth and effortless glides.”

7. Stinger

A stinger is a type of surfboard that features a narrow tail design. The term “stinger” is slang for this type of board due to the sharp and pointed shape of the tail.

  • For instance, a surfer might say, “I love riding my stinger in hollow waves.”
  • In a discussion about surfboard design, someone might ask, “What are the advantages of a stinger tail?”
  • A surfboard manufacturer might advertise, “Try our new stinger model for increased maneuverability and control.”

8. Fish

A fish is a type of surfboard that is shorter and wider than a standard shortboard. The term “fish” is slang for this type of board due to its resemblance to the shape of a fish, with a wide nose and swallowtail design.

  • For example, a surfer might say, “I’m taking out my fish today because the waves are small and mushy.”
  • In a conversation about different surfboard shapes, someone might ask, “Do you prefer riding a fish or a performance shortboard?”
  • A surf shop might advertise, “New shipment of fish boards just arrived for summer fun.”

9. Thruster

A thruster is a type of surfboard that features a three-fin setup, with one larger fin in the center and two smaller fins on the sides. The term “thruster” is slang for this type of board due to the powerful and controlled maneuverability it provides.

  • For instance, a surfer might say, “I love the responsiveness of my thruster in critical waves.”
  • In a discussion about surfboard fin setups, someone might ask, “What are the advantages of a thruster over a quad?”
  • A professional surfer might endorse, “I ride a thruster because it allows me to perform tight turns and generate speed.”

10. Gun

A gun is a type of surfboard that is longer and narrower than a standard shortboard. The term “gun” is slang for this type of board due to its ability to handle big waves and provide a fast and powerful ride.

  • For example, a surfer might say, “I’m taking out my gun today because the swell is pumping.”
  • In a conversation about surfboard sizes, someone might ask, “Do you own a gun for big wave surfing?”
  • A surfboard shaper might advertise, “Custom-made guns for charging massive waves with confidence.”

11. Mini-mal

A type of surfboard that is shorter and wider than a traditional longboard, but longer and narrower than a shortboard. It is designed to provide stability and easy paddling while still allowing for maneuverability and performance.

  • For example, “I’m going to take out my mini-mal today because the waves are small.”
  • A surfer might say, “I love riding my mini-mal because it’s so versatile and fun.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you think a mini-mal would be a good board for a beginner surfer?”

12. Funboard

A type of surfboard that is larger than a shortboard but smaller than a longboard. It is designed to provide the stability and float of a longboard while still allowing for maneuverability and performance like a shortboard.

  • For instance, “I’m going to take out my funboard today because the waves are small.”
  • A surfer might say, “Funboards are great for beginners because they’re stable and easy to ride.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the difference between a funboard and a mini-mal?”

13. Bonzer

A type of surfboard that features a unique fin setup with multiple fins, usually a combination of a large center fin and smaller side fins. The bonzer design is known for providing excellent control and maneuverability in a wide range of wave conditions.

  • For example, “I love riding my bonzer because it gives me so much control in big waves.”
  • A surfer might say, “Bonzers are great for carving turns and generating speed.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the advantage of having multiple fins on a surfboard?”

14. Single fin

A type of surfboard that has only one fin, typically located in the center of the board. Single fins are known for their smooth and flowing ride, making them popular among traditional longboarders and retro surfboard enthusiasts.

  • For instance, “I prefer riding single fins because they have a classic feel.”
  • A surfer might say, “Single fins are great for noseriding and trimming on the wave.”
  • Someone might ask, “Why do some surfers still ride single fins instead of modern thrusters?”

15. Step-up

A type of surfboard that is specifically designed for riding larger and more powerful waves. Step-up boards are longer, narrower, and have more rocker than standard shortboards, allowing surfers to handle the speed and power of big waves.

  • For example, “I need to get a step-up board for my upcoming surf trip to Hawaii.”
  • A surfer might say, “Step-up boards are essential for charging big waves and staying in control.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the difference between a step-up board and a regular shortboard?”

16. Stubby

A “stubby” refers to a surfboard that is shorter and wider than traditional boards. These boards are designed to provide stability and maneuverability in smaller waves.

  • For example, “I love riding my stubby board in small summer waves.”
  • A surfer might say, “A stubby board is great for generating speed and making tight turns.”
  • Another might comment, “I prefer a stubby board for beach breaks with fast, punchy waves.”

17. Rocket

A “rocket” is a slang term for a surfboard that is designed for high-performance surfing. These boards are typically shorter, narrower, and more responsive, allowing surfers to generate speed and perform advanced maneuvers.

  • For instance, “I just got a new rocket board and it’s incredibly fast.”
  • A surfer might say, “Riding a rocket board requires precise footwork and control.”
  • Another might comment, “A rocket board is perfect for hollow waves and critical sections.”

18. Plank

A “plank” refers to a surfboard that is long and flat, often resembling a wooden plank. These boards are typically used for retro or traditional style surfing, emphasizing smooth, flowing turns.

  • For example, “I enjoy riding a plank board for its classic feel.”
  • A surfer might say, “A plank board is great for nose riding and cross-stepping.”
  • Another might comment, “Riding a plank board requires patience and finesse.”

19. Craft

“Craft” is a general term used to refer to a surfboard. It can be used to describe any type or style of board, emphasizing the craftsmanship and artistry involved in surfboard design and manufacturing.

  • For instance, “I love trying out different craft to see how they perform.”
  • A surfer might say, “Choosing the right craft for the conditions is crucial.”
  • Another might comment, “Surfboard craft has evolved significantly over the years.”

20. Stick of dynamite

A “stick of dynamite” is a slang term used to describe a high-performance shortboard. These boards are designed for advanced surfers who want maximum speed and maneuverability in powerful waves.

  • For example, “He rode that wave like a stick of dynamite!”
  • A surfer might say, “A stick of dynamite is perfect for big, barreling waves.”
  • Another might comment, “Riding a stick of dynamite requires a lot of skill and confidence.”

21. Foil board

A foil board, also known as a hydrofoil surfboard, is a type of surfboard that uses a hydrofoil to lift the board above the water’s surface. This design allows for a smoother and faster ride, as the board glides on the foil instead of being dragged through the water.

  • For example, “I just tried out a foil board for the first time and it was an incredible experience.”
  • A surfer might say, “Foil boards are becoming more popular because they allow you to ride smaller waves.”
  • Another might comment, “Riding a foil board requires a lot of balance and control, but it’s worth the effort for the unique sensation it provides.”

22. Gunther

In surf slang, a “Gunther” refers to a longboard. Longboards are longer and wider than standard surfboards, providing more stability and ease of use for beginners or surfers who prefer a more relaxed style of riding.

  • For instance, “I’m bringing my Gunther to the beach today so I can catch some small waves.”
  • Someone might say, “I used to ride a shortboard, but now I prefer the smooth ride of a Gunther.”
  • A surfer might recommend, “If you’re just starting out, I suggest trying a Gunther to get the hang of it.”

23. Biscuit

A “Biscuit” is a slang term for a shortboard, which is a smaller and more maneuverable type of surfboard. Shortboards are typically used by experienced surfers who want to ride more aggressively and perform tricks on the waves.

  • For example, “I love the speed and responsiveness of my Biscuit.”
  • A surfer might say, “Shortboards like the Biscuit are great for riding hollow waves.”
  • Another might comment, “Riding a Biscuit requires a lot of skill and balance, but it’s worth it for the high-performance capabilities.”

24. Potato chip

In surf slang, a “Potato chip” refers to a thin and narrow surfboard. These boards are designed for high-performance surfing and are often used in competition settings where maneuverability and speed are key.

  • For instance, “I just bought a new Potato chip and can’t wait to try it out in big waves.”
  • A surfer might say, “Potato chips are great for quick turns and aerial maneuvers.”
  • Another might comment, “Riding a Potato chip requires a lot of skill and control, but the performance benefits are worth it.”

25. Hybrid

A “Hybrid” surfboard refers to a versatile board that combines elements of different surfboard designs. These boards are often a mix between a shortboard and a fish or a longboard and a shortboard, offering a balance between maneuverability and stability.

  • For example, “I love my Hybrid because it allows me to ride a variety of wave conditions.”
  • A surfer might say, “Hybrids are great for surfers who want to experiment with different styles of riding.”
  • Another might comment, “Riding a Hybrid gives you the best of both worlds – the maneuverability of a shortboard and the stability of a longboard.”

26. Loggy

A “loggy” refers to a longboard, which is a type of surfboard that is longer and wider than a shortboard. Longboards are typically used for cruising and catching small waves.

  • For example, a surfer might say, “I’m going to take out my loggy today because the waves are small.”
  • In a conversation about different surfboard shapes, someone might comment, “I prefer riding a loggy because it gives me more stability and control.”
  • A beginner surfer might ask, “Do you think I should start with a loggy or a shortboard?”

27. Pop-out

A “pop-out” refers to a surfboard that is mass-produced in a factory, as opposed to being hand-shaped by a custom shaper. Pop-outs are typically considered to be of lower quality compared to custom boards.

  • For instance, a surfer might say, “I bought a cheap pop-out board for beginners to practice on.”
  • In a discussion about surfboard construction, someone might mention, “Pop-outs are made using molds and are not as durable as custom boards.”
  • A surfer looking to upgrade their board might ask, “Should I invest in a custom board or stick with a pop-out?”

28. Sled

A “sled” refers to a shortboard, which is a type of surfboard that is shorter and narrower than a longboard. Shortboards are designed for maneuverability and are typically used for more advanced surfing.

  • For example, a surfer might say, “I love riding my sled because it allows me to perform sharp turns.”
  • In a conversation about different surfboard shapes, someone might comment, “Shortboards are great for riding steep and hollow waves.”
  • A surfer might ask, “Do you think I should switch from a longboard to a sled to challenge myself?”

29. Spoon

A “spoon” refers to a surfboard with a wide and rounded nose. The shape of the board resembles the shape of a spoon, hence the nickname. Spoon boards are known for their stability and are often used by beginners.

  • For instance, a surfer might say, “I learned how to surf on a spoon because it was easier to balance.”
  • In a discussion about different surfboard designs, someone might mention, “Spoon boards are great for catching small and mushy waves.”
  • A beginner surfer might ask, “Would a spoon be a good choice for me to start with?”

30. Pocket rocket

A “pocket rocket” refers to a high-performance shortboard that is designed for fast and aggressive surfing in critical sections of the wave. These boards are typically small, narrow, and have a lot of rocker.

  • For example, a surfer might say, “I love riding my pocket rocket because it allows me to generate a lot of speed.”
  • In a conversation about different surfboard models, someone might comment, “Pocket rockets are great for riding barreling waves.”
  • A surfer looking to improve their maneuverability might ask, “Do you think a pocket rocket would help me with my turns?”
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