Top 50 Slang For Temperature – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to talking about the weather, sometimes the standard terms just don’t cut it. Whether you’re freezing or sweating buckets, there’s a slang term for every temperature extreme. Join us as we break down the coolest and hottest slang for temperature that will have you feeling like a weather pro in no time. Get ready to spice up your weather conversations with these trendy terms that are sure to impress!

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1. Hot as balls

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is extremely hot. It is often used in a casual and exaggerated manner.

  • For example, “It’s hot as balls outside today!”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t stand this heat, it’s hot as balls in here!”
  • Another person might comment, “I’m sweating like crazy, it’s hot as balls in this room!”

2. Freezing

This word is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold. It is often used to emphasize the intensity of the cold.

  • For instance, “I can’t feel my fingers, it’s freezing outside!”
  • Someone might say, “Put on a jacket, it’s freezing in here!”
  • Another person might comment, “I’m shivering, it’s freezing cold in this room!”

3. Boiling

This term is used to describe a temperature that is very hot. It is often used to emphasize the intensity of the heat.

  • For example, “Be careful, the water is boiling hot!”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t touch the steering wheel, it’s boiling outside!”
  • Another person might comment, “I’m sweating like crazy, it’s boiling in this room!”

4. Chilly

This word is used to describe a temperature that is cool and slightly cold. It is often used to describe weather that is not extremely cold, but still requires a light jacket or sweater.

  • For instance, “I need a sweater, it’s chilly outside.”
  • Someone might say, “I love this weather, it’s nice and chilly!”
  • Another person might comment, “I’m feeling a bit cold, it’s getting chilly in here!”

5. Scorching

This term is used to describe a temperature that is extremely hot. It is often used to emphasize the intensity of the heat.

  • For example, “I can’t walk barefoot, the sand is scorching hot!”
  • Someone might say, “I’m sweating buckets, it’s scorching outside!”
  • Another person might comment, “I can’t stand this heat, it’s scorching in this room!”

6. Frigid

This term is used to describe temperatures that are significantly below freezing or uncomfortably cold. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who is emotionally cold or distant.

  • For example, “I can’t go outside without a jacket, it’s frigid out there!”
  • A person might complain, “The office AC is always on full blast, it’s frigid in here.”
  • Another might say, “She gave me a frigid stare, like she was ice-cold inside.”

7. Toasty

This slang term is used to describe temperatures that are comfortably warm and pleasant. It can also be used to describe a situation or environment that is warm and welcoming.

  • For instance, “I love sitting by the fireplace, it’s so toasty.”
  • A person might say, “The sun is shining and it’s a toasty day at the beach.”
  • Another might comment, “I just put on my fuzzy slippers and it feels so toasty in here.”

8. Nippy

This term is used to describe temperatures that are slightly cold or chilly. It can also be used to describe weather conditions that are brisk or windy.

  • For example, “I need to wear a light jacket, it’s a bit nippy outside.”
  • A person might say, “The wind is making it feel nippy, I should have worn a sweater.”
  • Another might comment, “I love going for a run in the morning when it’s nippy, it wakes me up.”

9. Sweating bullets

This slang phrase is used to describe both extreme heat and intense nervousness. It implies that someone is sweating profusely, like the size of bullets.

  • For instance, “I can’t stand the summer heat, I’m sweating bullets.”
  • A person might say, “I have a big presentation tomorrow and I’m sweating bullets.”
  • Another might comment, “The AC broke and it’s sweltering in here, I’m sweating bullets.”

10. Ice-cold

This term is used to describe temperatures that are extremely cold, often below freezing. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who is emotionally cold or unfeeling.

  • For example, “I forgot to close the window and now my room is ice-cold.”
  • A person might say, “She gave me an ice-cold stare, I could feel the chill.”
  • Another might comment, “The ice-cold water was refreshing after a long hike.”

11. Mild

Refers to a temperature that is neither hot nor cold, but rather moderate or gentle. It is often used to describe weather that is pleasant and comfortable.

  • For example, “Today’s weather is mild, perfect for a picnic.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer mild temperatures because I can dress in layers.”
  • In a conversation about the weather, someone might comment, “It’s been a mild winter so far.”

12. Roasting

Used to describe a temperature that is extremely hot or scorching. It implies that the weather or environment is uncomfortably warm.

  • For instance, “I’m sweating so much, it’s roasting outside.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t stand this roasting heat, I need some shade.”
  • In a discussion about summer weather, someone might say, “Last year, it was roasting hot every day.”

13. Frosty

Refers to a temperature that is very cold, often with frost or ice forming. It is typically used to describe winter weather or extremely cold conditions.

  • For example, “I had to scrape the frosty windshield before driving.”
  • A person might say, “Bundle up, it’s going to be frosty tonight.”
  • In a conversation about outdoor activities, someone might comment, “The frosty air makes skiing even more enjoyable.”

14. Balmy

Describes a temperature that is pleasantly warm and mild. It is often associated with comfortable and enjoyable weather.

  • For instance, “The beach is perfect right now, with balmy temperatures and a gentle breeze.”
  • A person might say, “I love going for a walk in the evening when it’s balmy outside.”
  • In a discussion about vacation destinations, someone might suggest, “Let’s go somewhere with balmy weather all year round.”

15. Arctic

Refers to a temperature that is extremely cold, similar to the conditions found in the Arctic region. It implies freezing temperatures and harsh weather conditions.

  • For example, “I can’t go outside without my heavy coat, it’s arctic out there.”
  • A person might complain, “The wind chill makes it feel like arctic temperatures.”
  • In a conversation about winter sports, someone might say, “I enjoy ice skating on the arctic lakes.”

16. Sizzling

This term is used to describe a temperature that is very high and uncomfortable. It often implies a level of heat that is intense and can cause discomfort or even pain.

  • For example, “The pavement was sizzling under the scorching sun.”
  • A weather report might say, “Temperatures will be sizzling in the triple digits today.”
  • A person might complain, “It’s sizzling in here, can we turn up the air conditioning?”

17. Brisk

This word is used to describe a temperature that is pleasantly cool and invigorating. It implies a level of freshness and a slight chill in the air.

  • For instance, “It’s brisk outside, perfect weather for a jog.”
  • A person might say, “I love taking brisk walks in the morning.”
  • A weather forecast might mention, “Expect brisk temperatures in the low 60s.”

18. Blistering

This term is used to describe a temperature that is exceptionally high and can cause discomfort or even injury. It implies a level of heat that is intense and can be dangerous.

  • For example, “The desert is known for its blistering heat.”
  • A weather report might warn, “Stay indoors during the blistering temperatures of the heatwave.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I can’t touch the steering wheel, it’s blistering hot!”

19. Breezy

This word is used to describe a temperature that is cool and refreshing, often accompanied by a light wind. It implies a level of comfort and relaxation in the air.

  • For instance, “The beach was breezy, perfect for flying a kite.”
  • A person might say, “I love sitting on the porch on a breezy summer evening.”
  • A weather forecast might mention, “Expect breezy conditions with temperatures in the mid-70s.”

20. Steamy

This term is used to describe a temperature that is hot and humid, often creating a sensation of moisture and stickiness in the air. It implies a level of heat that is intense and can be uncomfortable.

  • For example, “The sauna was steamy and made me sweat.”
  • A weather report might say, “Get ready for a steamy day with high humidity.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t stand the steamy weather, it’s so muggy!”

21. Boiling point

This term is used to describe a temperature that is very high or intense. It often refers to a situation or condition that is heated or intense.

  • For example, “The argument reached its boiling point and turned into a shouting match.”
  • In a discussion about the weather, someone might say, “The heatwave has pushed temperatures to their boiling point.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The tension between the two teams has reached its boiling point and a fight has broken out.”

22. Shivery

This term is used to describe a temperature that is cold or causes shivers. It often refers to a sensation or feeling of being cold.

  • For instance, “I forgot my jacket and now I’m feeling shivery.”
  • When discussing the weather, someone might say, “It’s so shivery outside, I can’t wait for spring to come.”
  • A person might describe their experience in a cold room by saying, “I walked into the ice cream shop and immediately felt shivery.”

23. Mild as milk

This term is used to describe a temperature that is neither hot nor cold, but rather moderate. It often refers to a temperature that is comfortable or pleasant.

  • For example, “The weather today is mild as milk, perfect for a picnic.”
  • When discussing the climate, someone might say, “The coastal regions have a mild as milk temperature throughout the year.”
  • A person might describe their preference for mild as milk weather by saying, “I enjoy living in a place with mild as milk summers.”

24. Tropical

This term is used to describe a temperature that is hot and humid, similar to the climate found in tropical regions. It often refers to a weather condition that is characterized by high temperatures and high humidity levels.

  • For instance, “I can’t stand the tropical weather, it’s too hot and sticky.”
  • When planning a vacation, someone might say, “Let’s go somewhere tropical and enjoy the warm weather and beautiful beaches.”
  • A person might describe their experience in a tropical climate by saying, “I love the tropical heat, it feels like paradise.”

25. Icy

This term is used to describe a temperature that is extremely cold or icy. It often refers to a weather condition or environment that is freezing or frosty.

  • For example, “The roads are icy, so be careful while driving.”
  • When discussing the winter season, someone might say, “I can’t wait for the icy temperatures to go away and for spring to arrive.”
  • A person might describe their experience in a cold room by saying, “I walked into the ice rink and immediately felt icy.”

26. Sunbaked

This term is used to describe a temperature that is scorching or blistering, similar to being baked in the sun for an extended period of time.

  • For example, “The desert was so sunbaked that the rocks were too hot to touch.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t go outside, it’s too sunbaked today.”
  • Another might comment, “The pavement is sunbaked, making it uncomfortable to walk on.”

27. Gelid

This word is used to describe a temperature that is icy or freezing, similar to being in a gelid environment.

  • For instance, “The wind was so gelid that it chilled me to the bone.”
  • A person might say, “I need to bundle up, it’s gelid outside.”
  • Another might comment, “The gelid water of the lake was too cold to swim in.”

28. Warm as toast

This phrase is used to describe a temperature that is pleasantly warm and cozy, similar to the warmth of toast fresh out of the toaster.

  • For example, “After sitting by the fireplace, I felt warm as toast.”
  • A person might say, “I love snuggling under a blanket when it’s warm as toast.”
  • Another might comment, “The sun shining through the window made the room feel warm as toast.”

29. Polar

This term is used to describe a temperature that is frigid or icy, similar to the extreme cold of the polar regions.

  • For instance, “I had to wear multiple layers because it was polar outside.”
  • A person might say, “The polar temperatures made it difficult to go outside.”
  • Another might comment, “The polar wind cut through my coat and chilled me to the bone.”

30. Sultry

This word is used to describe a temperature that is hot and humid, similar to the sultry conditions of a tropical climate.

  • For example, “The air was so sultry that it was difficult to breathe.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find some shade, it’s too sultry outside.”
  • Another might comment, “The sultry weather made it feel like a sauna.”

31. Bracing

Used to describe a temperature that is pleasantly cold and invigorating. It often implies that the cold temperature is a welcome change and provides a sense of refreshment.

  • For example, “The bracing winter air woke me up and made me feel alive.”
  • A person might say, “I love going for a run in the bracing cold weather.”
  • Another might comment, “The bracing wind on the mountaintop took my breath away.”

32. Biting

Refers to a temperature that is so cold it feels like it is physically biting or stinging the skin. It emphasizes the intensity and discomfort of the cold.

  • For instance, “The biting wind made it unbearable to be outside without proper layers.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand the biting cold of winter in this city.”
  • Another might complain, “The biting cold seeped through my jacket and chilled me to the bone.”

33. Mild as a lamb

Describes a temperature that is pleasantly warm or not very cold. It compares the temperature to the gentle and calm nature of a lamb.

  • For example, “After the heatwave, the weather became as mild as a lamb.”
  • A person might say, “I enjoy taking a walk in the park when the weather is mild as a lamb.”
  • Another might comment, “The mild as a lamb temperature is perfect for a picnic.”

34. Sahara-like

Refers to a temperature that is as hot and dry as the Sahara Desert. It emphasizes the extreme heat and lack of moisture in the air.

  • For instance, “The heatwave made the temperature feel Sahara-like.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t handle the Sahara-like heat of this summer.”
  • Another might complain, “The Sahara-like conditions are making it difficult to breathe.”

35. Arctic blast

Describes a sudden and intense drop in temperature, often associated with strong winds. It compares the extreme cold to the freezing conditions of the Arctic.

  • For example, “An arctic blast swept through the region, bringing sub-zero temperatures.”
  • A person might say, “I had to bundle up to protect myself from the arctic blast.”
  • Another might comment, “The arctic blast turned everything into an icy wonderland.”

36. Temperate

This term refers to a moderate or mild temperature. It is often used to describe weather that is neither too hot nor too cold.

  • For example, “The temperature today is quite temperate, perfect for a picnic.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer temperate climates over extreme heat or cold.”
  • In a discussion about global warming, someone might mention, “We need to preserve temperate regions to protect biodiversity.”

37. Sweltry

This slang term describes weather that is extremely hot and humid, making it uncomfortable and sticky.

  • For instance, “I can’t stand this sweltry weather, it’s making me sweat.”
  • A person might complain, “The sweltry heat is unbearable, I need some air conditioning.”
  • In a conversation about summer vacations, someone might say, “I avoid sweltry destinations and opt for cooler climates.”

38. Glacial

This term is used to describe extremely cold temperatures, often comparing them to the icy conditions of a glacier.

  • For example, “The wind made it feel absolutely glacial outside.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I can’t believe how glacial it is, I need to bundle up.”
  • In a discussion about winter sports, someone might mention, “I love skiing in glacial conditions, it’s so exhilarating.”

39. Bitter

This slang term describes cold weather that is harsh and uncomfortable, often making people feel bitter or resentful.

  • For instance, “The bitter cold made it difficult to go outside.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand this bitter weather, it’s freezing.”
  • In a conversation about winter fashion, someone might mention, “I need a warm coat to survive the bitter temperatures.”

40. Severe

This term is used to describe weather that is extremely intense and harsh, often referring to extreme temperatures.

  • For example, “The severe heatwave caused record-breaking temperatures.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful in the severe cold, it can be dangerous.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might mention, “We need to take action to prevent more severe weather events.”

41. Boiling hot

This term is used to describe a temperature that is very high and can be uncomfortable or unbearable.

  • For example, “It’s boiling hot outside today, I can’t stand it.”
  • Someone might say, “I touched the stove and it was boiling hot, I burned my finger.”
  • In a discussion about weather, a person might comment, “The temperature reached boiling hot levels today, it was scorching.”

42. Tepid

This term is used to describe a temperature that is neither hot nor cold, but rather in between.

  • For instance, “I prefer my coffee tepid, not too hot or cold.”
  • Someone might say, “The water in the pool was tepid, it was perfect for swimming.”
  • In a discussion about weather, a person might comment, “The temperature is quite tepid today, neither too hot nor too cold.”

43. Muggy

This term is used to describe a temperature that is hot and humid, often making the air feel heavy and uncomfortable.

  • For example, “It’s so muggy outside, I can’t breathe.”
  • Someone might say, “The humidity is making it feel muggy in here, I need some fresh air.”
  • In a discussion about weather, a person might comment, “The temperature is high and it’s muggy, I can’t wait for some rain to cool things down.”

44. Room temperature

This term is used to describe a temperature that is neither too hot nor too cold, typically around 20-22 degrees Celsius (68-72 degrees Fahrenheit). It refers to the temperature commonly found indoors.

  • For instance, “The wine should be served at room temperature.”
  • Someone might say, “I like to keep my bedroom at a comfortable room temperature.”
  • In a discussion about indoor climate, a person might comment, “The thermostat is set to room temperature, so it’s neither too warm nor too cold.”

45. Subzero

This term is used to describe a temperature that is below the freezing point of water, typically below 0 degrees Celsius (32 degrees Fahrenheit). It indicates extremely cold temperatures.

  • For example, “The temperature dropped to subzero levels overnight, it’s freezing outside.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t go outside without my heavy coat, it’s subzero.”
  • In a discussion about winter weather, a person might comment, “The subzero temperatures are causing icy conditions on the roads.”

46. Baking

This term is often used to describe very high temperatures, especially during the summer months or in hot climates. It implies that the heat is intense and can make you feel as if you’re being cooked.

  • For example, “It’s baking outside today, I can’t wait to jump in the pool.”
  • A person might say, “I’m staying indoors because it’s baking hot out there.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t handle this baking weather, it’s unbearable!”

47. Tropical heat

This term refers to a type of heat that is extremely hot and humid, similar to the weather experienced in tropical regions. It implies a heavy and oppressive heat that can make you feel like you’re in a tropical paradise.

  • For instance, “I can’t stand this tropical heat, it’s so sticky and uncomfortable.”
  • A person might say, “I love vacationing in tropical destinations, but the heat can be overwhelming.”
  • Another might complain, “The tropical heat is making it impossible to sleep at night!”

48. Subfreezing

This term is used to describe temperatures that are below the freezing point of water. It implies that the temperature is extremely cold and can cause water to freeze.

  • For example, “Bundle up, it’s subfreezing outside!”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe it’s subfreezing in April, this weather is crazy.”
  • Another might comment, “The subfreezing temperatures are wreaking havoc on the roads, be careful while driving.”

49. Polar vortex

This term refers to a weather phenomenon characterized by a large area of low pressure and extremely cold air that is centered around the Earth’s poles. It implies a frigid and dangerous cold spell.

  • For instance, “The polar vortex is bringing record-breaking cold temperatures to the region.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe how long the polar vortex is lasting this year.”
  • Another might comment, “The polar vortex is causing widespread power outages due to the extreme cold.”

50. Glowing

This term is used to describe temperatures that are very hot, often to the point of discomfort. It implies that the heat is intense and can make you feel as if you’re glowing with heat.

  • For example, “I’m sweating buckets, it’s glowing hot outside!”
  • A person might say, “I can’t handle this glowing weather, it’s too much.”
  • Another might complain, “The glowing temperatures are making it impossible to stay cool.”
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