Top 70 Slang For Toilet – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to talking about the toilet, we often resort to using the same old mundane word. But did you know there are dozens of fun and creative slang terms for the toilet? From quirky expressions to hilarious phrases, we’ve compiled a list that will leave you chuckling and maybe even rethinking your bathroom vocabulary. So, get ready to dive into this toilet talk and discover some of the most amusing ways to refer to this essential fixture in our lives.

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1. John

This is a common slang term for a toilet, often used in informal or casual conversations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the john.”
  • In a public restroom, a person might ask, “Excuse me, where’s the john?”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Don’t forget to flush the john after you’re done.”

2. Loo

“Loo” is a British slang term for a toilet or bathroom. It is commonly used in the UK and other English-speaking countries.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be in the loo, just give me a minute.”
  • In a restaurant, a person might ask, “Where’s the loo?”
  • A friend might joke, “I hope you have a loo nearby because I really need to go.”

3. Throne

This slang term refers to a toilet, often used humorously or metaphorically to emphasize the importance or grandeur of the act of using the toilet.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to go sit on the throne for a moment.”
  • In a conversation about personal needs, a person might say, “Everyone deserves a comfortable throne.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Remember to treat the throne with respect and keep it clean.”

4. Porcelain throne

The term “porcelain throne” is a playful and slightly exaggerated way to refer to a toilet, highlighting its regal appearance and the comfort it provides.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be in the bathroom, sitting on my porcelain throne.”
  • In a discussion about bathroom renovations, a person might say, “I dream of having a luxurious porcelain throne.”
  • A friend might joke, “Be careful not to spend too much time on your porcelain throne, or people will start calling you a king or queen.”

5. Commode

This slang term refers to a toilet, often used in a more formal or old-fashioned context.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the commode.”
  • In a historical novel, a character might ask, “Where’s the nearest commode?”
  • A person might comment, “I prefer the term ‘commode’ over ‘toilet’ because it sounds more elegant.”

6. WC

A term commonly used in Europe to refer to a toilet or restroom. It originated from the use of water to flush waste away in early plumbing systems.

  • For example, a sign might indicate “WC” to point towards the restroom in a public space.
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Excuse me, where can I find the WC?”
  • Travelers might use the term when asking for directions, saying, “Is there a WC nearby?”

7. Privy

An old-fashioned term for a toilet or an outdoor structure used for relieving oneself. It was commonly used in the past before indoor plumbing became widespread.

  • For instance, in historical settings, you might see a sign saying “Privy” to indicate the location of an outhouse.
  • In a story set in the past, a character might say, “I need to use the privy, be right back.”
  • When discussing the lack of modern amenities, someone might mention, “They didn’t even have indoor plumbing, just a privy in the backyard.”

8. Lavatory

A formal term used to refer to a room equipped with toilets and sinks for personal hygiene. It is often used in more formal settings such as hotels, restaurants, or office buildings.

  • For example, a sign might say “Lavatory” to indicate the restroom in a fancy restaurant.
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Excuse me, where is the lavatory?”
  • A person might say, “I need to freshen up, I’ll be in the lavatory.”

9. Restroom

A common term used in the United States to refer to a room or facility where one can use the toilet or wash up. The term “restroom” implies a space for relaxation and comfort.

  • For instance, a sign might indicate “Restroom” to point towards the toilet facilities in a public place.
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Can you tell me where the restroom is?”
  • When discussing the need for a break, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the restroom.”

10. Bathroom

A widely used term in North America to refer to a room or space containing a toilet and often a sink for personal hygiene. The term “bathroom” suggests a place where one can take care of personal needs.

  • For example, a sign might say “Bathroom” to indicate the toilet facilities in a home or public space.
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Where is the nearest bathroom?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be in the bathroom, just need a minute.”

11. Powder room

“Powder room” is a euphemistic term for a bathroom, typically used in more formal or upscale settings. It often refers to a small, separate room with a toilet and sink.

  • For example, a hostess might say, “The powder room is down the hall, on the left.”
  • In a fancy restaurant, a waiter might direct a guest, “The powder room is located upstairs, next to the bar.”
  • When discussing home renovations, someone might mention, “We’re planning to add a powder room on the first floor.”

12. Johnnie

“Johnnie” is a slang term for a toilet, typically used in informal or casual settings. It is a playful and lighthearted way to refer to the bathroom or restroom.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the Johnnie.”
  • In a group setting, a friend might ask, “Does anyone know where the Johnnie is?”
  • When talking about bathroom facilities, a person might joke, “Make sure to lock the Johnnie door!”

13. Can

“Can” is a colloquial term for a restroom or toilet, often used in casual or everyday conversation. It is a simple and straightforward way to refer to the bathroom.

  • For example, a person might ask, “Excuse me, where’s the nearest can?”
  • In a crowded venue, someone might say, “I need to find a can, this line is too long.”
  • When discussing plumbing issues, a homeowner might say, “We had to replace the can in our master bathroom.”

14. Pot

“Pot” is a slang term for a toilet, typically used in informal or colloquial settings. It is a humorous and slightly irreverent way to refer to the bathroom.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the pot.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might ask, “Do you know where the pot is in this place?”
  • When discussing bathroom renovations, a homeowner might say, “We’re thinking of getting a new pot for the guest bathroom.”

“Head” is a slang term for a bathroom, often used in informal or military contexts. It is derived from the nautical term for the front part of a ship, where the bathroom facilities were traditionally located.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “I’m going to the head to freshen up.”
  • In a military setting, a soldier might ask, “Where’s the nearest head?”
  • When discussing naval history, an enthusiast might mention, “The head on an old sailing ship was a far cry from modern bathrooms.”

16. Latrine

A latrine is a term often used to refer to a public restroom or a communal toilet facility.

  • For example, a sign might indicate, “Latrine facilities are located on the left.”
  • In a military setting, a soldier might say, “I’ll meet you at the latrine after training.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you know where the nearest latrine is?”

17. Gents

Gents is a slang term commonly used to refer to the men’s restroom or toilet.

  • For instance, a sign might indicate, “Gents restroom this way.”
  • In a conversation, a person might say, “Excuse me, I need to use the gents.”
  • Someone might ask, “Is there a gents restroom in this building?”

18. Ladies

Ladies is a slang term commonly used to refer to the women’s restroom or toilet.

  • For example, a sign might indicate, “Ladies restroom this way.”
  • In a conversation, a person might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the ladies.”
  • Someone might ask, “Is there a ladies restroom on this floor?”

19. Crapper

Crapper is a slang term often used to refer to a toilet or bathroom.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be in the crapper for a minute.”
  • In a humorous context, a person might say, “I dropped my phone in the crapper!”
  • Someone might ask, “Where’s the nearest crapper?”

20. Potty

Potty is a slang term commonly used to refer to a child’s toilet or a portable toilet.

  • For example, a parent might say, “It’s time to use the potty.”
  • In a conversation about toilet training, a person might say, “My toddler is learning to use the potty.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have a potty I can borrow for my toddler?”

21. Thunderbox

A thunderbox is an old-fashioned term for an outdoor toilet or an outhouse. It is typically a small wooden structure with a hole in the ground for waste disposal.

  • For example, “I had to use the thunderbox while camping in the woods.”
  • In a historical context, one might say, “People used to rely on thunderboxes before modern plumbing.”
  • A nostalgic individual might reminisce, “I remember using the thunderbox at my grandparents’ house when I was a child.”

22. Bog

Bog is a colloquial term used to refer to a toilet. It is commonly used in British English.

  • For instance, “I need to use the bog before we leave.”
  • In a casual conversation, one might say, “I’ll be right back, I’m just going to the bog.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where the nearest bog is?”

23. Dunny

Dunny is an Australian slang term for an outdoor toilet or an outhouse. It is derived from the British term “dunnekin,” which means a small, private room.

  • For example, “I found a snake in the dunny while camping.”
  • In a humorous context, one might say, “I’ll be in the dunny if you need me.”
  • A person might inquire, “Is there a dunny nearby?”

24. Wazoo

Wazoo is a slang term used to refer to a toilet. It is a playful and informal way to talk about using the restroom.

  • For instance, “I’ll be back in a minute, I just need to use the wazoo.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation, one might say, “I can’t believe they put a TV in the wazoo.”
  • A person might ask, “Where’s the nearest wazoo?”

25. Tinkle palace

Tinkle palace is a humorous slang term for a toilet. It is often used in a playful or sarcastic manner.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to visit the tinkle palace.”
  • In a joking context, one might say, “Welcome to my luxurious tinkle palace.”
  • A person might playfully ask, “Would you like a tour of the tinkle palace?”

26. Little boys’/girls’ room

This term refers to a bathroom that is intended for use by young children. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Do you need to go to the little boys’ room before we leave?”
  • In a school setting, a teacher might ask a student, “Can you show your classmate where the little girls’ room is?”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “I’ll meet you in the little boys’ room, don’t take too long!”

27. Water closet

This term originated from the use of water tanks to flush waste in early plumbing systems. It is still used in some regions as a euphemism for the toilet.

  • For instance, a host might direct a guest, “The water closet is just down the hall on the right.”
  • In a historical context, one might read about “the invention of the water closet revolutionizing sanitation.”
  • Someone might casually say, “I’ll be right back, just need to use the water closet.”

28. Necessary

This term is a colloquialism for the toilet or restroom. It is often used in casual conversation or in informal settings.

  • For example, someone might ask, “Where’s the necessary around here?”
  • In a humorous context, a person might say, “I’ll be in the necessary, don’t bother me for a while!”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s stop at the nearest gas station and use the necessary before continuing our road trip.”

29. Facilities

This term is a common way to refer to public restrooms or toilets. It is often used in formal or professional settings.

  • For instance, a sign might indicate, “Restroom facilities are located on the second floor.”
  • In a conversation about event planning, someone might mention, “We need to make sure there are enough facilities for the attendees.”
  • A person might ask, “Are there any facilities nearby? I really need to use the restroom.”

30. Convenience

This term is a euphemism for the toilet or restroom. It is often used to politely refer to the need to use the bathroom.

  • For example, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to find a convenience.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might ask, “Is there a convenience nearby?”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “I’ll be back in a minute, just need to visit the convenience.”

31. Outhouse

An outhouse is a small structure located outside, typically in rural or outdoor settings, that serves as a restroom. It is usually a simple wooden building with a hole in the ground or a pit toilet.

  • For example, when camping in the wilderness, you might have to use an outhouse instead of a traditional bathroom.
  • In a conversation about historical living conditions, someone might mention, “Back in the old days, people relied on outhouses for their bathroom needs.”
  • A hiker might ask, “Is there an outhouse nearby? I really need to use the restroom.”

32. Porta-potty

A porta-potty is a portable toilet designed for temporary use in outdoor or remote locations. It is a small, self-contained unit that can be easily transported and set up in different locations.

  • For instance, at outdoor events like music festivals or construction sites, you will often find porta-potties for attendees or workers to use.
  • A person attending a concert might say, “I can’t wait for the porta-potties to arrive. The lines for the bathrooms are always too long.”
  • When discussing the logistics of an outdoor event, someone might ask, “Have we arranged enough porta-potties to accommodate the expected number of attendees?”

33. Honey bucket

Honey bucket is a slang term for a portable toilet. The term originated from the practice of using buckets filled with a mixture of lime and sawdust to absorb waste and control odor.

  • For example, in construction sites or camping areas, honey buckets are often provided as temporary restroom facilities.
  • A person preparing for a camping trip might say, “Don’t forget to pack a honey bucket. There might not be any restrooms nearby.”
  • In a conversation about outdoor events, someone might comment, “The honey buckets at that music festival were surprisingly clean and well-maintained.”

34. Sanitary station

A sanitary station refers to a clean and well-maintained restroom facility. It is a term commonly used in public places to indicate a restroom that meets certain hygiene standards.

  • For instance, in airports or shopping malls, you will often find signs directing you to the sanitary station.
  • A person looking for a restroom might ask, “Excuse me, where can I find the nearest sanitary station?”
  • When discussing the quality of a restaurant, someone might say, “Their food is great, and they also have really nice sanitary stations.”

35. Washroom

Washroom is a term used to refer to a bathroom or restroom where individuals can wash their hands and perform personal hygiene tasks.

  • For example, in schools or office buildings, signs will often indicate the location of the washrooms.
  • A person in a restaurant might ask, “Can you point me to the washroom? I need to freshen up.”
  • When discussing the facilities in a hotel, someone might comment, “The washrooms in this hotel are always clean and well-stocked.”

36. Latrinalia

Latrinalia refers to the act of writing or drawing on bathroom walls or stalls. It is a form of bathroom graffiti that often includes jokes, drawings, or messages.

  • For example, “The latrinalia in this restroom is quite creative and entertaining.”
  • A person might say, “I always find interesting latrinalia when using public restrooms.”
  • A comedian might joke, “My best material is written in latrinalia.”

37. Thundermug

Thundermug is an old slang term for a toilet or chamber pot. It is a humorous and somewhat outdated term that was commonly used in the past.

  • For instance, “In the days before indoor plumbing, people would use a thundermug as a toilet.”
  • A historian might explain, “Thundermug was a popular term for a chamber pot in the 19th century.”
  • A writer might use the term in a historical novel, saying, “She emptied the contents of the thundermug into the outhouse.”

38. John-John

John-John is a playful slang term for a toilet. It is a lighthearted and informal way to refer to the bathroom fixture.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I just need to use the John-John.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you need to use the John-John before we leave?”
  • A person might say, “I hate it when someone clogs the John-John and doesn’t fix it.”

39. Little house

Little house is a slang term for an outhouse, which is an outdoor toilet typically found in rural areas or older buildings without indoor plumbing.

  • For instance, “The cabin in the woods had a little house in the backyard for a toilet.”
  • A person might reminisce, “I remember using a little house when I visited my grandparents’ farm.”
  • A writer might describe a scene, saying, “She made her way to the little house behind the barn to relieve herself.”

40. Lav

Lav is a slang term for a restroom or bathroom. It is a shortened form of the word “lavatory” and is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I’ll be back in a minute, I need to use the lav.”
  • A person might ask, “Excuse me, do you know where the lav is?”
  • A sign in a public place might read, “Lavatory facilities are located on the first floor.”

41. Khazi

Khazi is a slang term for a toilet or bathroom. It is commonly used in British English.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the khazi.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where’s the khazi in this place?”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe I clogged the khazi again!”

42. Netty

Netty is a slang term for a toilet or bathroom. It is commonly used in Australian English.

  • For instance, “I’ll be quick, just need to use the netty.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ll meet you by the netty in 5 minutes.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a netty around here?”

43. Porcelain God

Porcelain God is a humorous slang term for a toilet. It refers to the fact that toilets are often made of porcelain and are sometimes seen as a place of relief or contemplation.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to pay a visit to the porcelain god.”
  • Someone might say, “I spent a lot of time praying to the porcelain god this morning.”
  • A person might joke, “The porcelain god is my sanctuary.”

44. The facilities

The facilities is a polite term for a public restroom or toilet. It is often used in formal or professional settings.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, can you please direct me to the facilities?”
  • Someone might say, “I’ll be back in a moment, just need to use the facilities.”
  • A person might ask, “Are there any facilities nearby?”

45. Comfort station

Comfort station is a euphemistic term for a public restroom or toilet. It is often used in formal or military contexts.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the comfort station.”
  • Someone might say, “The comfort station is located near the entrance.”
  • A person might ask, “Where’s the nearest comfort station?”

46. The office

This term is used as a euphemism for the toilet, particularly in a professional or workplace setting. It refers to the place where one goes to take care of their personal business.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “I’ll be back in a few minutes, I need to visit the office.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where the office is located on this floor?”
  • In an office building with multiple floors, someone might say, “I prefer using the office on the second floor.”

47. The sandbox

This term is often used to refer to the toilet, especially in a casual or playful manner. It creates a lighthearted image of a place where one goes to take care of their bathroom needs.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the sandbox.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where’s the nearest sandbox around here?”
  • In a group of friends, someone might jokingly say, “Who’s ready to head to the sandbox?”

48. The porcelain throne

This phrase humorously compares the toilet to a royal throne, emphasizing its importance and significance in one’s daily life. It suggests that using the toilet is a regal affair.

  • For example, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to go sit on the porcelain throne.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you ever experienced the comfort of a porcelain throne?”
  • In a discussion about bathroom decor, someone might say, “I’m thinking of getting a fancy porcelain throne for my bathroom.”

49. The white house

This term playfully refers to the toilet, using the name of the famous residence of the President of the United States. It adds a touch of humor and familiarity to the act of using the toilet.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’ll be upstairs, I need to use the white house.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where’s the nearest white house in this building?”
  • In a conversation about bathroom renovations, a homeowner might say, “I’m considering installing a new white house in my bathroom.”

50. The porcelain palace

This term elevates the toilet to a grandiose level by comparing it to a palace made of porcelain. It conveys a sense of luxury and extravagance associated with using the toilet.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ll be in the porcelain palace if anyone needs me.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you know where the nearest porcelain palace is located?”
  • In a discussion about bathroom fixtures, someone might say, “I’ve always dreamed of having a porcelain palace in my home.”

51. Clogged

To have a blockage in the toilet or drain, preventing water from flowing properly. The term “clogged” is often used to describe a toilet that is not flushing properly due to an obstruction.

  • For instance, “I need to call a plumber, my toilet is clogged.”
  • If someone is experiencing a clogged toilet, they might ask for help saying, “Can you unclog the toilet for me?”
  • A person might complain, “I hate it when the toilet gets clogged, it’s such a hassle.”

52. Long Drop

A long drop is a slang term used to refer to an outdoor toilet or an outhouse. It is typically a simple structure with a hole in the ground for waste to drop into.

  • For example, “I had to use the long drop while camping in the woods.”
  • When discussing outdoor facilities, someone might say, “The campground has long drops for visitors to use.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I find a long drop around here?”

53. Nature Calls

This phrase is used to indicate the need to use the toilet. It is often used when someone feels the urge to urinate or have a bowel movement.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, nature calls. I’ll be right back.”
  • If someone is in a hurry to use the bathroom, they might say, “Nature calls, I can’t wait any longer.”
  • A person might announce, “I’ll be stepping away for a moment, nature calls.”

54. Porta Potty

A porta potty is a portable toilet that is often used in outdoor events or construction sites. It is a small, self-contained unit that can be easily transported.

  • For example, “I had to use a porta potty at the music festival.”
  • When discussing event facilities, someone might say, “There are porta potties available for attendees.”
  • A person might ask, “Where is the nearest porta potty?”

55. Potty Training

The process of teaching young children to use the toilet instead of diapers. Potty training involves teaching children to recognize the need to use the toilet and to use it independently.

  • For instance, “We are currently in the process of potty training our toddler.”
  • If someone is discussing parenting, they might say, “Potty training can be a challenging phase.”
  • A parent might ask for advice, saying, “Any tips for successful potty training?”

56. Riding the Porcelain Bus

This phrase is a playful way to say that someone is using the toilet. It refers to the act of sitting on the porcelain seat of a toilet.

  • For example, if someone asks where you’ve been, you might respond, “I was riding the porcelain bus.”
  • In a humorous conversation about bathroom habits, someone might say, “I spend a lot of time riding the porcelain bus.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you coming out soon or are you still riding the porcelain bus?”

57. Gents’/Ladies’ room

This term refers to the restroom facilities designated for either men or women. “Gents'” is short for “gentlemen’s room” and “Ladies'” is short for “ladies’ room”.

  • For instance, if someone asks where the restroom is, you might respond, “The gents’ room is on the left and the ladies’ room is on the right.”
  • In a crowded venue, someone might ask, “Excuse me, where’s the nearest ladies’ room?”
  • A sign at a restaurant might indicate, “Gents’ room on the first floor, ladies’ room on the second floor.”

58. Water closet (WC)

This term is a more formal way to refer to a toilet. It originates from the British term “water closet” which was used to describe a small room or compartment with a flushing toilet.

  • For example, if someone asks where the bathroom is, you might respond, “The water closet is down the hall.”
  • In a discussion about bathroom fixtures, someone might mention, “The water closet is an essential part of any modern home.”
  • A hotel might have a sign that says, “WC located on the ground floor.”

59. Shitter

This slang term refers to a toilet. It is considered more vulgar and crude compared to other terms for a toilet.

  • For instance, if someone asks where the bathroom is, you might respond, “The shitter is around the corner.”
  • In a casual conversation about bodily functions, someone might say, “I really need to use the shitter.”
  • A comedian might make a joke like, “I walked into a fancy restaurant and asked where the shitter was. They pointed me to a golden throne.”

60. W.C.

This term is an abbreviation for “water closet” and is commonly used in Europe to refer to a toilet. It is often seen on signs or labels.

  • For example, if someone asks where the restroom is, you might respond, “The W.C. is on the second floor.”
  • In a discussion about bathroom terminology, someone might mention, “W.C. is a common term used in many European countries.”
  • A public facility might have signs that say, “W.C. for customers only.”

61. The loo

The term “the loo” is a slang term used to refer to the bathroom or toilet. It is commonly used in British English.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to use the loo.”
  • In a restaurant, a person might ask, “Where is the loo?”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the loo.”

62. The throne

The term “the throne” is a slang term used to refer to the toilet. It is often used humorously or to add a touch of grandeur to the act of using the bathroom.

  • For instance, “I’m going to go sit on the throne for a while.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll be back, I need to pay a visit to the throne.”
  • A person might joke, “I feel like a king every time I sit on the throne.”

63. The commode

The term “the commode” is a slang term used to refer to the toilet. It is derived from the French word for “convenient” and is often used in a humorous or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the commode.”
  • In a playful conversation, someone might say, “I’m the queen of the commode.”
  • A person might ask, “Where’s the nearest commode?”

64. The WC

The term “the WC” is a slang term used to refer to the toilet. It is derived from the British term “water closet,” which was used to describe a small room or closet containing a toilet.

  • For instance, “I need to use the WC, be right back.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll meet you outside, I just need to find the WC.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know where the nearest WC is?”

65. The privy

The term “the privy” is a slang term used to refer to the toilet. It is derived from the term “privy chamber,” which historically referred to a room used for personal needs.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to use the privy.”
  • In a humorous conversation, someone might say, “I’ll be in the privy if you need me.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a privy in this building?”

66. The lavatory

This is a formal term for a room or compartment containing a toilet and a washbasin. “The lavatory” is a more polite and formal way to refer to a toilet.

  • For example, in a fancy restaurant, a sign might say, “Please use the lavatory for your convenience.”
  • A flight attendant might announce, “The lavatories are located at the front and back of the plane.”
  • Someone might ask, “Excuse me, where is the lavatory?”

67. The can

This is a slang term for a toilet. It is a casual and informal way to refer to the bathroom or restroom.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the can.”
  • In a humorous conversation, a person might joke, “I hope you have a plunger in the can.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can I use your can?”

68. The head

This is a slang term commonly used in military or naval contexts to refer to a toilet or bathroom. It originates from the nautical term for the front part of a ship, where the toilet facilities were located.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “I’m heading to the head, I’ll be back in a minute.”
  • In a military barracks, someone might say, “Make sure to keep the head clean and tidy.”
  • A navy officer might instruct, “Report any issues with the head to the ship’s maintenance crew.”

69. The restroom

This is a polite and formal term for a room or facility containing a toilet and a washbasin. “The restroom” is commonly used in public places such as restaurants, hotels, or office buildings.

  • For instance, a sign might say, “Restrooms are located on the first floor.”
  • A person might ask, “Excuse me, where is the restroom?”
  • In a conversation about hygiene, someone might say, “Always wash your hands after using the restroom.”

70. The bathroom

This is a common and straightforward term for a room or space containing a toilet and often a sink or other facilities for personal hygiene. “The bathroom” is the most widely used term to refer to the toilet in everyday conversation.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the bathroom.”
  • In a household, a parent might ask, “Did you remember to clean the bathroom?”
  • A person might comment, “The bathroom is occupied, you’ll have to wait.”
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