Top 45 Slang For Too Much – Meaning & Usage

Feeling overwhelmed by the abundance of slang for “too much” floating around? Look no further! We’ve done the heavy lifting to bring you a curated list of the most popular and trendy terms used to express excess in everyday conversations. Get ready to up your slang game and stay ahead of the curve with our comprehensive guide to the best slang for “too much”.

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1. Extra

When something is “extra,” it means it is excessive or over the top. It is often used to describe someone’s behavior or appearance that is overdone or exaggerated.

  • For example, “She wore so much makeup, she looked extra.”
  • A person might say, “His reaction to the news was so extra.”
  • In a discussion about a party, someone might comment, “The decorations were extra and made the event more memorable.”

2. Overload

To have an “overload” means to have an excessive amount of something. It can refer to information, work, or anything that is overwhelming or too much to handle.

  • For instance, “I have an overload of assignments to complete.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “My phone is constantly overloaded with notifications.”
  • A person might comment, “I need a break from social media. It’s sensory overload.”

3. Overabundance

When there is an “overabundance,” it means there is an excessive supply or quantity of something. It often implies that there is more than enough, to the point of being unnecessary or wasteful.

  • For example, “There is an overabundance of food at the buffet.”
  • In a discussion about resources, someone might say, “We need to redistribute the overabundance to those in need.”
  • A person might comment, “The overabundance of options can make it difficult to make a decision.”

4. Overindulgence

To engage in “overindulgence” means to excessively indulge or indulge to an excessive degree. It refers to consuming or experiencing something to an extent that is beyond what is considered normal or healthy.

  • For instance, “I had an overindulgence of sweets during the holidays.”
  • In a conversation about alcohol, someone might say, “Overindulgence can lead to negative health effects.”
  • A person might comment, “I need to avoid overindulgence and practice moderation.”

5. Overdo

To “overdo” something means to do it with excessive effort or action. It implies going beyond what is necessary or appropriate.

  • For example, “She tends to overdo her makeup for everyday occasions.”
  • In a discussion about exercise, someone might say, “It’s important not to overdo it and risk injury.”
  • A person might comment, “I think you’re overdoing it with all those accessories.”

6. Overdo it

– She always overdoes it with her makeup, it looks unnatural.

  • Don’t overdo it with the spices, a little goes a long way.
  • He tends to overdo it at the gym and ends up injuring himself.

7. Over the limit

– He was pulled over for driving over the speed limit.

  • The party was getting too rowdy and the noise levels were over the limit.
  • She went over the limit with her credit card and now has a lot of debt.

8. Too much of a good thing

– You can have too much of a good thing, so enjoy your dessert in moderation.

  • After eating pizza every day for a month, he realized that too much of a good thing can get boring.
  • She loves shopping, but she’s realized that too much of a good thing can lead to financial trouble.

9. Exorbitant

– The price for that designer handbag is exorbitant, I could never afford it.

  • He paid an exorbitant amount for a concert ticket because it was a rare performance.
  • The rent for that apartment is exorbitant, I’ll have to find something more affordable.

10. Gluttonous

– She had a gluttonous meal, ordering multiple appetizers and desserts.

  • He has a gluttonous appetite for chocolate, he can’t resist eating it every day.
  • The buffet was filled with gluttonous options, tempting everyone to overeat.

11. Extravagant

Extravagant refers to something that is excessive or over the top in terms of cost, design, or appearance. It is often used to describe luxurious or lavish things.

  • For example, “She threw an extravagant party with a live band and gourmet food.”
  • A person might comment, “His taste in clothing is always extravagant and eye-catching.”
  • In a discussion about vacations, someone might say, “I prefer to stay in more affordable accommodations rather than splurge on extravagant hotels.”

12. Superfluous

Superfluous means something that is unnecessary or excessive, beyond what is needed or required. It is often used to describe things that are redundant or surplus to requirements.

  • For instance, “The extra decorations on the cake were superfluous and made it too busy.”
  • In a conversation about decluttering, someone might say, “I’m getting rid of all the superfluous items in my house.”
  • A person might comment, “His long-winded explanations are often filled with superfluous details.”

13. Surfeit

Surfeit refers to an excessive amount or an overabundance of something. It is often used to describe a surplus or an overwhelming quantity.

  • For example, “After eating so much at the buffet, I had a surfeit of food.”
  • In a discussion about material possessions, someone might say, “Our society is obsessed with surfeit and consumerism.”
  • A person might comment, “I have a surfeit of clothes in my closet that I never wear.”

14. Abundance

Abundance refers to a large quantity or plenty of something. It is often used to describe a plentiful or copious amount.

  • For instance, “The garden was filled with an abundance of colorful flowers.”
  • In a conversation about natural resources, someone might say, “We should strive to use our resources wisely and not take abundance for granted.”
  • A person might comment, “Living in a rural area, I appreciate the abundance of fresh air and open spaces.”

15. Overflow

Overflow refers to a situation where there is an excessive amount or an overflow of something. It is often used to describe a surplus or an overwhelming quantity that exceeds capacity.

  • For example, “The river overflowed its banks after heavy rainfall.”
  • In a discussion about storage, someone might say, “I need to declutter my closet because it’s overflowing with clothes.”
  • A person might comment, “The restaurant was so popular that it had a constant overflow of customers.”

16. Surplus

This term refers to an amount or quantity that is more than what is needed or desired. It is often used to describe a situation where there is an abundance or an overflow of something.

  • For example, “We have a surplus of food after the party, so feel free to take some home.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “Having a surplus of money at the end of the month is always a good thing.”
  • A person talking about their wardrobe might mention, “I have a surplus of shoes, but I can never find the right pair to wear.”

17. Flooded

To be “flooded” means to be completely overwhelmed or inundated with something. It is often used to express a feeling of being swamped or unable to handle a large amount of work, information, or emotions.

  • For instance, “I’m flooded with emails and can’t keep up with my inbox.”
  • In a conversation about a busy restaurant, someone might say, “The place was flooded with customers during the lunch rush.”
  • A student talking about their workload might complain, “I’m flooded with assignments and exams this week.”

18. Swamped

When someone is “swamped,” they are burdened or overwhelmed with a large amount of work or responsibilities. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is struggling to keep up with their tasks or obligations.

  • For example, “I’m swamped with deadlines at work and can’t take on any additional projects.”
  • In a discussion about a busy schedule, someone might say, “I’m swamped with meetings and appointments all day.”
  • A person talking about their personal life might mention, “I’m swamped with family obligations and barely have time for myself.”

19. Drowning

To feel like you are “drowning” means to be overwhelmed or consumed by a situation or task. It is often used to describe a feeling of being unable to cope or keep up with demands.

  • For instance, “I’m drowning in paperwork and can’t find a way to organize it all.”
  • In a conversation about a high-stress job, someone might say, “I feel like I’m drowning in deadlines and expectations.”
  • A student talking about their workload might complain, “I’m drowning in assignments and don’t know how to prioritize.”

20. Suffocating

To feel “suffocated” means to feel overwhelmed or oppressed by something, often in an emotional or psychological sense. It is often used to describe a situation where someone feels trapped or restricted.

  • For example, “I feel suffocated by the constant demands of my job and never having time for myself.”
  • In a discussion about a controlling relationship, someone might say, “I felt suffocated by my partner’s constant need for control.”
  • A person talking about their living situation might mention, “Living in a crowded city can make you feel suffocated by the lack of space and privacy.”

21. Bombarded

This term refers to being inundated or overwhelmed with a large amount of information, tasks, or stimuli.

  • For example, “I was bombarded with emails after my vacation.”
  • A student might say, “During finals week, I feel bombarded with assignments and exams.”
  • In a discussion about advertising, someone might comment, “Consumers are bombarded with advertisements everywhere they go.”

22. Saturated

When something is saturated, it means it is completely filled or soaked with something, often to the point of being unable to absorb any more.

  • For instance, “The market is saturated with similar products.”
  • A person talking about their schedule might say, “My calendar is saturated with meetings and appointments.”
  • In a conversation about social media, someone might mention, “My feed is saturated with ads and sponsored posts.”

23. Crammed

To be crammed means to be packed tightly or filled to capacity.

  • For example, “The bus was so crowded that we were crammed together.”
  • A person talking about a storage space might say, “The closet is crammed with clothes.”
  • In a discussion about a concert, someone might comment, “The venue was crammed with excited fans.”

24. Stuffed

When something is stuffed, it means it is filled completely, often to the point of being unable to fit any more.

  • For instance, “I can’t eat anymore, I’m stuffed.”
  • A person talking about their suitcase might say, “I can’t fit anything else in, it’s stuffed.”
  • In a conversation about a storage space, someone might mention, “The attic is stuffed with old furniture and boxes.”

25. Jam-packed

Jam-packed refers to a space or event that is extremely crowded or filled to capacity.

  • For example, “The concert was jam-packed with fans.”
  • A person talking about a busy airport might say, “The terminal was jam-packed with travelers.”
  • In a discussion about a popular tourist attraction, someone might comment, “During peak season, it’s always jam-packed with tourists.”

26. Bursting at the seams

This phrase is used to describe a situation or place that is filled to capacity or beyond capacity. It implies that there is no more room left and things are about to burst or overflow.

  • For example, “The concert venue was bursting at the seams with fans eager to see their favorite band.”
  • A person talking about a crowded restaurant might say, “The place was bursting at the seams, we had to wait for an hour to get a table.”
  • When describing a busy event, someone might say, “The conference was bursting at the seams with attendees from all over the world.”

27. Loaded

This term is used to describe a situation or a person who has an abundance of something, often referring to money or possessions.

  • For instance, “He’s loaded with cash, he can buy whatever he wants.”
  • A person talking about a friend’s car collection might say, “He’s got a garage full of luxury cars, he’s loaded.”
  • When describing a buffet with a wide variety of food options, someone might say, “The buffet table was loaded with delicious dishes.”

28. Packed to the rafters

This phrase is used to describe a place or a container that is filled to its maximum capacity, often with people or objects.

  • For example, “The stadium was packed to the rafters with excited fans cheering for their team.”
  • A person describing a busy party might say, “The house was packed to the rafters, you could barely move.”
  • When talking about a storage room filled with boxes, someone might say, “The room is packed to the rafters with old files and documents.”

29. Brimming

This word is used to describe a situation or a container that is filled to the top, often with a liquid or an emotion.

  • For instance, “Her eyes were brimming with tears as she watched the emotional scene.”
  • A person describing a cup of coffee might say, “The cup was brimming with steaming hot coffee.”
  • When talking about a person who is full of joy, someone might say, “She’s brimming with happiness after receiving the good news.”

30. Stacked

This term is used to describe a situation or a person who has a significant amount of something, often referring to physical objects.

  • For example, “The shelves were stacked with books of all genres.”
  • A person describing a well-stocked pantry might say, “She’s got her pantry stacked with all kinds of snacks.”
  • When talking about a person with a muscular physique, someone might say, “He’s stacked with muscles from his rigorous workout routine.”

31. Teeming

This word is used to describe a situation or place that is full or overflowing with people or things. It emphasizes an abundance or excessive amount.

  • For example, “The streets were teeming with tourists during the summer festival.”
  • A person might say, “The party was teeming with energy and excitement.”
  • In a crowded market, someone might comment, “The place was teeming with shoppers.”

32. Chock-full

This phrase is used to describe something that is completely full or filled to capacity. It suggests that there is no room for anything else.

  • For instance, “The grocery bag was chock-full of fresh produce.”
  • A person might say, “My schedule is chock-full of meetings today.”
  • When describing a bookshelf, someone might say, “It’s chock-full of books on various topics.”

33. Stuffed to the gills

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is packed or filled to the maximum capacity. It suggests that there is no more room left.

  • For example, “After Thanksgiving dinner, I was stuffed to the gills.”
  • A person might say, “The suitcase was stuffed to the gills with clothes.”
  • When talking about a crowded room, someone might comment, “The concert hall was stuffed to the gills with fans.”

34. Sardined

This word is used to describe a situation or place where people or objects are packed together tightly, resembling how sardines are tightly packed in a can. It emphasizes a lack of space or overcrowding.

  • For instance, “The subway during rush hour was sardined with commuters.”
  • A person might say, “The concert was so popular that the venue was sardined with fans.”
  • When describing a small car with many passengers, someone might comment, “We were sardined in that tiny car.”

35. Stuffed like a turkey

This phrase is used to describe someone who has eaten so much that they feel extremely full, similar to a turkey that has been stuffed with stuffing. It emphasizes a feeling of being overly full.

  • For example, “After the holiday feast, I felt stuffed like a turkey.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t eat another bite, I’m stuffed like a turkey.”
  • When describing a buffet with a wide variety of food, someone might comment, “The buffet table was stuffed like a turkey with delicious options.”

36. Stuffed to the brim

When something is “stuffed to the brim,” it means it is packed or filled to its maximum capacity.

  • For example, “After the Thanksgiving feast, I was stuffed to the brim with food.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t eat another bite, I’m stuffed to the brim.”
  • In a crowded room, someone might comment, “This place is stuffed to the brim with people.”

37. Packed like sardines

This phrase is used to describe a place or situation where people or objects are tightly packed together, similar to sardines in a can.

  • For instance, “The subway during rush hour is always packed like sardines.”
  • A person might say, “We were packed like sardines in that tiny car.”
  • In a crowded concert, someone might comment, “We’re all packed like sardines in here.”

38. Stuffed to capacity

When something is “stuffed to capacity,” it means it is filled to its maximum limit or capacity.

  • For example, “The stadium was stuffed to capacity for the championship game.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t fit anything else in my suitcase, it’s stuffed to capacity.”
  • In a restaurant, a server might say, “I’m sorry, but we’re stuffed to capacity right now. You’ll need to wait for a table.”

39. Packed to the brim

Similar to “stuffed to the brim,” when something is “packed to the brim,” it means it is filled or packed completely.

  • For instance, “The suitcase was packed to the brim with clothes.”
  • A person might say, “The theater was packed to the brim for the premiere.”
  • In a storage room, someone might comment, “Every shelf is packed to the brim with boxes.”

40. Brimming over

When something is “brimming over,” it means it is filled to the point of overflowing.

  • For example, “The river was brimming over after the heavy rain.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so happy, my heart is brimming over with joy.”
  • In a cup that is too full, someone might comment, “Be careful, that cup is brimming over.”

41. Overstuffed

When something is “overstuffed,” it means it is filled or packed to a degree that is beyond what is considered normal or comfortable.

  • For example, “I can’t eat another bite, I’m completely overstuffed from dinner.”
  • A person might say, “My suitcase is so overstuffed, I can barely close it.”
  • In a conversation about furniture, someone might comment, “That couch looks so cozy, it’s overstuffed with cushions.”

42. Stuffed to the max

When something is “stuffed to the max,” it means it is filled or packed to the absolute maximum capacity.

  • For instance, “I ate so much at the buffet, I’m stuffed to the max.”
  • A person might say, “My schedule is stuffed to the max, I have no free time.”
  • In a discussion about a storage unit, someone might mention, “I’ve got it stuffed to the max with boxes and furniture.”

43. Stuffed to the hilt

When something is “stuffed to the hilt,” it means it is filled or packed to the very limit or maximum extent.

  • For example, “I can’t fit anything else in my closet, it’s stuffed to the hilt.”
  • A person might say, “The car was stuffed to the hilt with camping gear.”
  • In a conversation about a backpack, someone might comment, “I’ve got it stuffed to the hilt with books and supplies.”

44. Overdone

When something is “overdone,” it means it is done to an excessive or exaggerated degree.

  • For instance, “The steak was overdone and came out too dry.”
  • A person might say, “The decorations for the party were overdone and too flashy.”
  • In a discussion about makeup, someone might mention, “Her contouring was overdone and looked unnatural.”

45. Overloaded

When something is “overloaded,” it means it is carrying or containing more than it can handle or more than what is considered normal or reasonable.

  • For example, “The server crashed because it was overloaded with too many requests.”
  • A person might say, “My schedule is overloaded with back-to-back meetings.”
  • In a conversation about a backpack, someone might comment, “I can’t fit anything else in my bag, it’s overloaded with books and supplies.”
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