Top 32 Slang For Tribe – Meaning & Usage

In a world where connection and community are key, finding the right slang for tribe can make all the difference. Whether you’re part of a close-knit group of friends or a community of like-minded individuals, understanding the language that binds you together is essential. Let us guide you through the diverse and vibrant world of tribe slang, helping you navigate the intricacies of belonging and camaraderie with ease.

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1. Crew

A crew refers to a close-knit group of friends or associates who share a common interest or purpose. It is often used to describe a group of people who work together or spend a lot of time together.

  • For example, “Me and my crew are going out for a night on the town.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “Our crew is ready to dominate the competition.”
  • A person might describe their group of friends as, “My crew is always there for me.”

2. Squad

A squad is a tight-knit group of friends who are always there for each other and have each other’s backs. It is often used to describe a group of friends who do everything together and have a strong bond.

  • For instance, “I’m going out with my squad tonight.”
  • In a social media caption, someone might write, “Squad goals: always supporting each other.”
  • A person might say, “I have the best squad ever.”

3. Clan

A clan refers to a close group of people who share a common ancestry or interest. It is often used to describe a tight-knit community or family-like group.

  • For example, “The Smith clan gathers every year for a family reunion.”
  • In a gaming context, someone might say, “Join our clan and dominate the competition.”
  • A person might describe a group of fans as, “The Taylor Swift clan is incredibly dedicated.”

4. Posse

A posse is a group of friends or associates who hang out together and are often seen together. It is often used to describe a group of people who are known for being a team or a crew.

  • For instance, “Me and my posse are hitting up the club tonight.”
  • In a movie, a character might say, “Gather the posse, we have a mission to complete.”
  • A person might describe their group of friends as, “My posse is always up for an adventure.”

5. Pack

A pack refers to a small group of close friends who stick together and support each other. It is often used to describe a group of friends who have a strong bond and rely on each other.

  • For example, “Me and my pack are going on a road trip.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I can always count on my pack to have my back.”
  • A person might describe their closest friends as, “My pack is like my second family.”

6. Gang

A group of individuals who come together for a common purpose, often engaging in criminal activities or territorial disputes. “Gang” is commonly used to refer to a group of people who share a close bond or identity.

  • For example, in a movie about street life, a character might say, “I run with a gang that’s always got my back.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might mention, “The gang operates in the city’s underground.”
  • A person talking about their close-knit group of friends might say, “We’ve been a gang since high school.”

7. Tribe

A community of people who share common values, beliefs, and interests. “Tribe” often refers to a group that has a strong sense of identity and connection.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I found my tribe in the artistic community.”
  • In a conversation about cultural heritage, a person might mention, “I’m proud of my Native American tribe.”
  • A traveler might say, “I love exploring different tribes and learning about their traditions.”

8. Family

A group of people who are related by blood or marriage, or who have a strong bond and support system. “Family” can also refer to a close-knit group of friends or colleagues.

  • For example, a person might say, “I come from a large family with many cousins.”
  • In a discussion about loyalty, someone might say, “I consider my close friends to be like family.”
  • A person talking about their work environment might say, “We’re like a family at the office, always supporting each other.”

9. Circle

A small, exclusive group of people who share similar interests or socialize together. “Circle” often refers to a tight-knit group of friends or acquaintances.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a small circle of friends who I trust completely.”
  • In a conversation about social dynamics, a person might mention, “Cliques often form in high school.”
  • A person talking about their close group of friends might say, “We’ve been in the same circle since college.”

10. Unit

A cohesive group of individuals who work together towards a common goal or objective. “Unit” often refers to a team or organization with a strong sense of camaraderie.

  • For example, in a military context, someone might say, “Our unit completed the mission successfully.”
  • In a discussion about sports, a person might mention, “The soccer team functions as a unit on the field.”
  • A person talking about their work team might say, “We’re a tight-knit unit, always supporting each other.”

11. Collective

A group of individuals who work together towards a common goal or share a common interest. “Collective” often refers to a group that acts as a unit, making decisions together and pooling resources.

  • For example, an artist collective might collaborate on projects and share studio space.
  • In a political context, a collective might organize protests or advocate for specific policies.
  • A member of a collective might say, “We’re working together to create a better future for our community.”

12. Clique

A small, exclusive group of people who share similar interests or social status. “Clique” often carries a negative connotation, implying that the group is exclusive and may exclude others.

  • For instance, in high school, there might be a popular clique that everyone wants to be a part of.
  • In a workplace, a clique might form among colleagues who socialize outside of work and exclude others.
  • Someone might say, “I don’t want to be part of their clique; they’re too exclusive.”

13. Faction

A subgroup within a larger organization or community that has distinct beliefs, goals, or interests. “Faction” often implies a division or disagreement within the larger group.

  • For example, in politics, there might be factions within a party that have different policy priorities.
  • In a video game community, there might be factions that compete against each other for control of in-game resources.
  • A member of a faction might say, “Our faction believes in a more progressive approach to solving this issue.”

14. Community

A group of people who share common interests, values, or goals and often support and rely on each other. “Community” can refer to a specific geographic area or a virtual space where people connect online.

  • For instance, a neighborhood community might organize events and support local businesses.
  • In an online gaming community, players might form friendships and help each other progress in the game.
  • A member of a community might say, “I love being part of this community; we’re like a big family.”

15. Squadron

A military term referring to a group of soldiers or military aircraft that operate together as a team. “Squadron” often implies a high level of coordination and shared objectives.

  • For example, a fighter jet squadron might train together and deploy on missions as a unit.
  • In a video game, players might join a squadron to compete in team-based matches.
  • A member of a squadron might say, “We’re the best squadron in the fleet; no one can match our skills.”

16. Ensemble

Ensemble is a slang term used to refer to a group of people who work or perform together. It is often used in the entertainment industry to describe a group of actors, musicians, or dancers who collaborate on a project.

  • For example, a theater director might say, “The ensemble cast did an amazing job in the musical.”
  • In a music concert, a fan might comment, “The ensemble’s harmonies were on point.”
  • A dance instructor might say, “The ensemble’s precision and synchronization were impressive.”

17. Hive

Hive is a slang term used to describe a tight-knit community or group of people who share a common interest or goal. It is often used to emphasize the unity and cooperation within the group.

  • For instance, a fan of a sports team might say, “I love being part of the team’s hive.”
  • In a discussion about a fandom, a member might say, “Our hive is always buzzing with excitement.”
  • A social media influencer might refer to their followers as their “hive.”
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18. Troop

Troop is a slang term used to refer to a close-knit group of people, often with a common purpose or affiliation. It is commonly used to describe a gang or a group of friends who have each other’s backs.

  • For example, a member of a street gang might say, “I’m part of a troop that runs this neighborhood.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “My troop and I have been through thick and thin together.”
  • A person talking about their close-knit group might say, “We’re not just friends, we’re a troop.”

19. Band

Band is a slang term used to describe a group of people who work or perform together, usually in the music industry. It often refers to a group of musicians who play instruments and perform live music.

  • For instance, a fan might say, “I love this band’s sound and energy.”
  • In a discussion about a music festival, someone might ask, “Which bands are performing this year?”
  • A music critic might write, “This band’s latest album is a must-listen.”

20. Assembly

Assembly is a slang term used to describe a gathering or meeting of people, often with a specific purpose or agenda. It can refer to a group of individuals coming together for a common cause or event.

  • For example, a political activist might say, “We’re organizing an assembly to discuss our demands.”
  • In a conversation about a protest, someone might say, “The assembly marched through the streets chanting slogans.”
  • A member of a club might invite others by saying, “Join us for our weekly assembly to discuss our shared interests.”

21. Coalition

A group of individuals or organizations that come together for a common purpose or goal. A coalition is often formed to address a specific issue or advocate for a particular cause.

  • For example, “The environmental groups formed a coalition to fight against deforestation.”
  • In politics, different parties might form a coalition to gain a majority in government.
  • A news headline might read, “Coalition of businesses supports new legislation for small businesses.”

22. Congregation

A gathering or meeting of people, typically for religious worship or a shared purpose. Congregation is often associated with a religious context, but can also refer to any group of people coming together.

  • For instance, “The congregation gathered for Sunday service at the church.”
  • In a community meeting, someone might say, “Thank you all for being here. This is a congregation of concerned citizens.”
  • A news article might report, “The congregation of fans cheered on their favorite team at the stadium.”

23. Association

A group of people who come together for a specific purpose, often to promote a common interest or profession. Associations are typically formalized and have specific membership criteria.

  • For example, “The American Medical Association is an association of doctors and medical professionals.”
  • In the business world, someone might say, “I’m a member of the local chamber of commerce, which is an association of local businesses.”
  • A news headline might read, “Teachers’ association calls for increased funding for education.”

24. League

A group of individuals or organizations that come together for a common purpose or goal. A league often implies a formalized structure and may involve competition or cooperation.

  • For instance, “The professional sports league oversees multiple teams and organizes games.”
  • In gaming, players might form a league to compete against each other in organized matches.
  • A news article might report, “The league of nations came together to address global issues after World War I.”

25. Society

A group of individuals who share common values, interests, or activities and live together in a specific geographic area or interact regularly. Society can also refer to a larger social structure or organization.

  • For example, “The Amish society has its own unique customs and way of life.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “We need to address the inequalities in our society.”
  • A news headline might read, “The society of artists organized an exhibition to showcase local talent.”

26. Team

A “team” refers to a group of individuals who come together to work towards a common objective or goal. It often implies collaboration, coordination, and mutual support among its members.

  • For example, in sports, a coach might say, “We win as a team and lose as a team.”
  • In a workplace setting, a team member might say, “Let’s divide the tasks and work as a team to meet the deadline.”
  • A project manager might emphasize the importance of teamwork by saying, “The success of this project depends on how well we function as a team.”

27. Horde

A “horde” refers to a large group or crowd of people. It often implies a chaotic or overwhelming presence, as well as a lack of organization or structure within the group.

  • For instance, during a protest, someone might say, “Look at the horde of people marching for their rights.”
  • In a crowded concert, a concert-goer might exclaim, “The horde of fans made it difficult to move.”
  • When describing a busy shopping mall, one might say, “The horde of shoppers made it hard to find a parking spot.”

28. Bunch

A “bunch” refers to a small or informal group of people. It often implies a casual or close-knit gathering, where the members share a common interest or activity.

  • For example, a group of friends going out together might say, “Let’s get the whole bunch together for a night out.”
  • In a casual setting, someone might ask, “Can I join your bunch for a game of cards?”
  • When discussing a group of colleagues, one might say, “Our bunch always goes out for lunch together.”

29. Mob

A “mob” refers to a large and unruly crowd of people. It often implies a sense of chaos, disorder, and potentially violent behavior within the group.

  • For instance, during a riot, someone might say, “The mob set fire to the buildings and looted the stores.”
  • In a crowded concert, if the crowd becomes rowdy, a security guard might warn, “We need to control the mob before it gets out of hand.”
  • When describing a protest that turned violent, one might say, “The peaceful demonstration quickly turned into a mob.”

30. Alliance

An “alliance” refers to a partnership or collaboration between different groups or individuals. It often implies a shared goal, mutual support, and cooperation among the members of the alliance.

  • For example, in politics, two parties might form an alliance to gain more power and influence.
  • In a business context, companies might form an alliance to share resources and expand their market reach.
  • When discussing a military operation, one might say, “The alliance between the two countries was crucial for the success of the mission.”

31. Union

In slang terms, a “union” refers to a group or crew of people who work together or are associated with each other. It can also imply a sense of loyalty and camaraderie within the group.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going out with my union tonight” to refer to their group of friends.
  • In a conversation about a sports team, someone might say, “The players on the field have a strong union.”
  • A person might describe a close-knit group of coworkers as a “workplace union.”
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32. Syndicate

A “syndicate” is a slang term used to describe a gang or organized group of individuals involved in illegal activities. It often implies a sense of secrecy and collaboration within the group.

  • For instance, in a crime movie, a character might say, “The syndicate has control over the entire city.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might mention, “The syndicate operates in various cities, running their illicit operations.”
  • A person might describe a group of friends involved in mischievous activities as a “neighborhood syndicate.”