Top 55 Slang For Was – Meaning & Usage

“Was” may seem like a simple word, but there are actually a plethora of slang terms that can spice up your conversations and add a touch of flair to your language. Our team has scoured the depths of modern vernacular to bring you a list of the top slang for “was” that will have you sounding hip and in-the-know in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to upgrade your vocabulary game with these trendy expressions!

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1. Wasn’t

This is a contraction of “was not” and is used to indicate the negative form of the verb “to be” in the past tense.

  • For example, “I wasn’t able to attend the party last night.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might say, “I wasn’t aware of the deadline.”
  • A person might explain, “I wasn’t expecting to see you here.”

2. Weren’t

This is a contraction of “were not” and is used to indicate the negative form of the verb “to be” in the past tense.

  • For instance, “We weren’t able to find the keys.”
  • In a discussion about a group activity, someone might say, “We weren’t prepared for the challenge.”
  • A person might clarify, “We weren’t expecting any visitors today.”

3. Ain’t

This is a colloquial contraction of “am not,” “is not,” or “are not” and is used to indicate the negative form of the verb “to be” in the present tense.

  • For example, “I ain’t going to the party.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s plans, someone might say, “He ain’t coming with us.”
  • A person might assert, “They ain’t telling the truth.”

4. Wuz

This is a slang abbreviation of the word “was” and is used in informal contexts.

  • For instance, “I wuz there when it happened.”
  • In a conversation about a past event, someone might say, “She wuz the one who started the argument.”
  • A person might reminisce, “It wuz a beautiful day.”

5. Woz

This is a slang abbreviation of the word “was” and is used in informal contexts.

  • For example, “I woz just about to leave when you called.”
  • In a discussion about a past experience, someone might say, “It woz the best vacation I ever had.”
  • A person might explain, “He woz the one who broke the vase.”

6. Wozz

This is a slang term for “was” and is often used in casual conversation or informal writing. It is a shortened form of the word “was” and is commonly used in text messages or online chats.

  • For example, a person might say, “I wozz just at the store.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I wozz wondering if you wanted to hang out.”
  • Another might comment on a social media post, “That wozz a great party last night!”

7. Wuzza

Similar to “wozz,” “wuzza” is another slang term for “was.” It is also a shortened form of the word and is commonly used in informal conversations or online communication.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I wuzza so tired after work.”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “Wuzza thinking we could grab dinner tonight.”
  • Another might comment on a friend’s post, “Wuzza fun night we had last weekend!”

8. Wozza

Another variation of the slang term “was,” “wozza” is commonly used in casual conversations or informal writing. It is a shortened form of the word and is often used in text messages or online chats.

  • For example, a person might say, “I wozza just about to leave when you called.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “Wozza planning on going to the beach this weekend.”
  • Another might comment on a social media post, “Wozza good movie, wasn’t it?”

9. Wazz

“Wazz” is yet another slang term for “was.” It is a shortened form of the word and is commonly used in casual conversations or informal writing. It is often used in text messages or online chats.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I wazz so excited to see you.”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “Wazz just about to call you when you texted.”
  • Another might comment on a friend’s post, “Wazz a great party, wish I could’ve been there!”

10. Wazzup

Although not directly related to the word “was,” “wazzup” is a slang term commonly used as a greeting to ask “What’s up?” It is often used in casual conversations or informal writing, particularly among friends or acquaintances.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hey, wazzup? Long time no see!”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “Wazzup? Wanna grab some lunch later?”
  • Another might comment on a social media post, “Wazzup with all the cute dog pictures lately?”

11. Wazzam

A slang term used to greet or ask someone how they are doing. It is a shortened version of “What’s happening?” or “What’s up?”

  • For example, a person might say, “Hey, wazzam?” as a casual way of saying hello.
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Wazzam with you? Anything new?”
  • When catching up with a friend, they might say, “Wazzam, long time no see!”

12. Wazzat

A slang term used to ask someone to clarify or repeat what they just said. It is a shortened version of “What’s that?”

  • For instance, if someone mentions something unclear, you might ask, “Wazzat? Can you explain?”
  • In a noisy environment, you might say, “Sorry, I couldn’t hear you. Wazzat you said?”
  • When someone points at an object, you might ask, “Wazzat? Is it something interesting?”

13. Wazzit

A slang term used to ask someone what something is or what it means. It is a shortened version of “What is it?”

  • For example, if someone mentions an unfamiliar term, you might ask, “Wazzit? I’ve never heard of that.”
  • In a conversation about a new gadget, you might ask, “Wazzit exactly? How does it work?”
  • When someone shows you a picture, you might ask, “Wazzit? Is it a famous landmark?”

14. Wazzis

A slang term used to ask someone about something they are currently holding or looking at. It is a shortened version of “What is this?”

  • For instance, if someone shows you an object, you might ask, “Wazzis? It looks interesting.”
  • In a conversation about a mysterious item, you might ask, “Wazzis thing? Have you seen it before?”
  • When someone hands you an unfamiliar object, you might ask, “Wazzis? What am I supposed to do with it?”

15. Wazzitoya

A slang term used to ask someone why they are interested or involved in a particular matter. It is a shortened version of “What was it to you?”

  • For example, if someone questions your involvement in a situation, you might respond, “Wazzitoya? It’s my business.”
  • In a conversation about personal choices, you might ask, “Wazzitoya? Why do you care?”
  • When someone criticizes your actions, you might ask, “Wazzitoya? How does it affect you?”

16. Wazzitoyou

This phrase is a slang way of asking someone why they are concerned or bothered about something. It is often used in a confrontational or dismissive manner.

  • For example, if someone asks about your personal life, you might respond with “Wazzitoyou?”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say, “You don’t know anything about me, so wazzitoyou?”
  • If someone criticizes your fashion choices, you could reply with “If you don’t like it, wazzitoyou?”

17. Wazzitome

Similar to “Wazzitoyou,” this phrase is a slang way of expressing indifference or lack of concern about something. It can be used to dismiss someone’s opinion or question.

  • For instance, if someone tries to gossip about someone else, you might respond with “Wazzitome?”
  • In a situation where someone is trying to involve you in drama, you could say, “I don’t care, wazzitome?”
  • If someone criticizes your choices, you might reply with “It’s my life, wazzitome?”

18. Wazzitomee

Similar to “Wazzitome,” this phrase is a slang way of expressing indifference or lack of concern about something. It can be used to dismiss someone’s opinion or question, with an added emphasis on the speaker.

  • For example, if someone tries to give unsolicited advice, you might respond with “Wazzitomee?”
  • In a situation where someone is trying to involve you in drama, you could say, “I don’t care, wazzitomee?”
  • If someone criticizes your choices, you might reply with “It’s my life, wazzitomee?”

19. Wazzupwitdat

This phrase is a slang way of asking about the reason or explanation for something. It is often used when expressing confusion, frustration, or disbelief.

  • For instance, if someone tells you a strange story, you might respond with “Wazzupwitdat?”
  • In a situation where something unexpected happens, you could say, “I can’t believe it, wazzupwitdat?”
  • If someone is acting suspiciously, you might ask, “Hey, wazzupwitdat?”

20. Wazzupwitdis

Similar to “Wazzupwitdat,” this phrase is a slang way of asking about the reason or explanation for something. It is often used when expressing confusion, frustration, or disbelief, with an added emphasis on the speaker.

  • For example, if someone shows you a strange object, you might respond with “Wazzupwitdis?”
  • In a situation where something unexpected happens, you could say, “I can’t believe it, wazzupwitdis?”
  • If someone is acting suspiciously, you might ask, “Hey, wazzupwitdis?”

21. Wazzupwitchoo

This is a variation of the phrase “What’s up with you?” and is commonly used to ask someone how they are or what they are currently doing.

  • For example, “Hey, wazzupwitchoo? How’s your day going?”
  • A person might greet their friend with, “Wazzupwitchoo, man? Long time no see!”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “So, wazzupwitchoo this weekend? Any plans?”

22. Wazzupwitcho

Similar to “Wazzupwitchoo,” this slang is used to ask someone how they are or what they are currently doing.

  • For instance, “Hey, wazzupwitcho? How’s it going?”
  • A person might greet their friend with, “Wazzupwitcho, dude? What have you been up to?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “So, wazzupwitcho? Anything interesting happening in your life?”

23. Wazzupwitchooz

Another variation of the phrase “What’s up with you?” used to ask someone how they are or what they are currently doing.

  • For example, “Hey, wazzupwitchooz? How are things going?”
  • A person might greet their friend with, “Wazzupwitchooz, bro? Tell me what’s been happening.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “So, wazzupwitchooz lately? Anything exciting going on?”

24. Werencha

This slang is a contraction of “weren’t you” and is used to ask if someone did or didn’t do something in the past.

  • For instance, “Werencha supposed to meet me at the cafe?”
  • A person might ask, “Werencha going to the party last night?”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might say, “Werencha gonna ask her out?”

25. Weren’tcha

Similar to “Werencha,” this slang is a contraction of “weren’t you” and is used to ask if someone did or didn’t do something in the past.

  • For example, “Weren’tcha gonna call me yesterday?”
  • A person might ask, “Weren’tcha going to finish that project?”
  • In a conversation about a forgotten task, someone might say, “Weren’tcha supposed to pick up the groceries?”

26. Wasn’tcha

This is a contraction of “wasn’t you.” It is a colloquial way of asking someone if they were not the one who performed a certain action or had a certain experience.

  • For example, someone might say, “Wasn’tcha the one who ate the last slice of pizza?”
  • In a playful argument, one person might accuse the other, saying, “Wasn’tcha the one who said we should go to that party?”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Wasn’tcha the one who forgot to do your homework?”

27. Wasn’t it

This is a phrase used to confirm or clarify a previous statement or question. It is often used when seeking agreement or acknowledgment from the listener.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The weather was beautiful yesterday, wasn’t it?”
  • In a conversation about a movie, one person might ask, “The ending was unexpected, wasn’t it?”
  • A speaker might say, “We had such a great time at the party last night, wasn’t it fun?”

28. Weren’t it

This is a phrase used to express doubt or disbelief about a previous statement or question. It is often used to question the accuracy or truthfulness of something.

  • For example, someone might say, “You said you won the lottery, weren’t it just a joke?”
  • In a discussion about a news article, one person might ask, “The story claimed aliens visited Earth, weren’t it just a hoax?”
  • A skeptical person might say, “You expect me to believe you saw a ghost, weren’t it just your imagination?”

29. Wasn’t I

This is a phrase used to seek confirmation or agreement from others. It is often used when questioning one’s own actions or behavior.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I was the one who called you yesterday, wasn’t I?”
  • In a group discussion, one person might ask, “I was the one who suggested this idea, wasn’t I?”
  • A person reflecting on past events might say, “I was the one who made that mistake, wasn’t I?”

30. Weren’t I

This is a phrase used to express doubt or disbelief about one’s own actions or behavior. It is often used to question the accuracy or truthfulness of something one has said or done.

  • For example, someone might say, “I said I would finish the project on time, weren’t I just making empty promises?”
  • In a self-reflective moment, one might ask, “I was the one who caused the argument, weren’t I being unreasonable?”
  • A person questioning their own memory might say, “I was the one who forgot to lock the door, weren’t I just being absent-minded?”

31. Wasn’t she

This phrase is a colloquial contraction of “was not she” and is used to express surprise or disbelief about a statement or situation involving a female subject.

  • For example, if someone says, “She won the race,” another person might respond, “Wasn’t she?” to express doubt or astonishment.
  • In a conversation about a girl who got a promotion, someone might say, “She got promoted to manager,” and another person might reply, “Wasn’t she? I can’t believe it!”
  • A person might also use this phrase to question someone’s memory or recollection, such as saying, “You said she was at the party last night, but wasn’t she actually out of town?”

32. Weren’t she

Similar to “wasn’t she,” this phrase is a colloquial contraction of “were not she” and is used to express surprise or disbelief about a statement or situation involving a female subject.

  • For instance, if someone says, “She said she’s not coming to the party,” another person might respond, “Weren’t she?” to express doubt or astonishment.
  • In a conversation about a girl who won a scholarship, someone might say, “She got a full scholarship,” and another person might reply, “Weren’t she? That’s incredible!”
  • This phrase can also be used to question someone’s memory or recollection, such as saying, “You said she was at the meeting, but weren’t she actually on vacation?”

33. Wasn’t he

This phrase is a colloquial contraction of “was not he” and is used to express surprise or disbelief about a statement or situation involving a male subject.

  • For example, if someone says, “He won the lottery,” another person might respond, “Wasn’t he?” to express doubt or astonishment.
  • In a conversation about a guy who got a promotion, someone might say, “He’s the new department head,” and another person might reply, “Wasn’t he? That’s amazing!”
  • A person might also use this phrase to question someone’s memory or recollection, such as saying, “You said he was at the party, but wasn’t he actually out of town?”

34. Weren’t he

Similar to “wasn’t he,” this phrase is a colloquial contraction of “were not he” and is used to express surprise or disbelief about a statement or situation involving a male subject.

  • For instance, if someone says, “He said he’s not going to the concert,” another person might respond, “Weren’t he?” to express doubt or astonishment.
  • In a conversation about a guy who won a championship, someone might say, “He scored the winning goal,” and another person might reply, “Weren’t he? That’s unbelievable!”
  • This phrase can also be used to question someone’s memory or recollection, such as saying, “You said he was at the meeting, but weren’t he actually on a business trip?”

35. Wasn’t there

This phrase is a colloquial contraction of “was not there” and is used to express surprise or disbelief about the absence or nonexistence of something or someone in a particular place or situation.

  • For example, if someone says, “There was a huge crowd at the concert,” another person might respond, “Wasn’t there?” to express doubt or astonishment.
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “There were so many celebrities,” and another person might reply, “Wasn’t there? I wish I could have been there!”
  • A person might also use this phrase to question someone’s memory or recollection, such as saying, “You said there were no leftovers, but wasn’t there actually some pizza left?”

36. Weren’t there

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something was not in a specific location or place.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Hey, were you at the party last night?” and the person wasn’t there, they might respond, “No, I weren’t there.”
  • In a conversation about a concert, someone might say, “I heard there were some amazing performances, but I weren’t there to witness it.”
  • A person discussing a missed opportunity might say, “I regret that I weren’t there to support my friend during their big moment.”

37. Wasn’t that

This phrase is used to express that something did not happen or was not as expected or anticipated.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I thought you were going to help me with the project,” and the person didn’t, they might respond, “Sorry, I wasn’t that.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing movie, someone might say, “I had high expectations, but it wasn’t that great.”
  • A person reflecting on a past event might say, “Looking back, I realize that things weren’t that simple as I thought.”

38. Weren’t that

This phrase is used to convey that someone or something was not as expected or did not meet a certain standard or criteria.

  • For example, if someone says, “I heard the food at that restaurant was amazing,” and the person disagrees, they might respond, “No, it weren’t that.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing performance, someone might say, “The band’s last album was great, but their new one just wasn’t that.”
  • A person discussing a failed attempt might say, “I tried my best, but the outcome wasn’t that I hoped for.”

39. Wasn’t here

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something was not in a specific location or place.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Where were you during the meeting?” and the person wasn’t present, they might respond, “Sorry, I wasn’t here.”
  • In a discussion about a missed event, someone might say, “I heard the party was amazing, but I wasn’t here to experience it.”
  • A person reflecting on a past vacation might say, “I wish I could go back to that beautiful beach, but I wasn’t here.”

40. Weren’t here

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something was not in a specific location or place.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Were you at the office yesterday?” and the person wasn’t there, they might respond, “No, I weren’t here.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might say, “I heard the conference was insightful, but I weren’t here to attend.”
  • A person discussing a past event might say, “I wish I could have been there, but unfortunately, I weren’t here.”

41. Wasn’t gone

This phrase is used to indicate that someone or something was not present or available.

  • For example, “I looked for you at the party, but you wasn’t gone.”
  • In a conversation about a missed opportunity, someone might say, “The chance to meet my favorite celebrity wasn’t gone.”
  • A person might use this phrase to explain their absence, saying, “I couldn’t make it to the meeting, I wasn’t gone.”

42. Weren’t gone

Similar to “wasn’t gone,” this phrase is used to indicate that multiple people or things were not present or available.

  • For instance, “The keys weren’t gone, so I couldn’t drive.”
  • In a discussion about a party, someone might say, “Many of the invited guests weren’t gone.”
  • A person might use this phrase to explain why a certain item was not found, saying, “The documents weren’t gone, so I couldn’t complete the task.”

43. Wasn’t enough

This phrase is used to express that something was not enough or did not meet the desired level or standard.

  • For example, “I studied, but it wasn’t enough to pass the exam.”
  • In a conversation about a job application, someone might say, “My qualifications weren’t enough to get the position.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express dissatisfaction with a meal, saying, “The portion size wasn’t enough for me.”

44. Wasn’t me

This phrase is used to deny involvement or responsibility for something.

  • For instance, if accused of a wrongdoing, someone might say, “It wasn’t me.”
  • In a conversation about a mistake, someone might say, “The error in the report wasn’t me.”
  • A person might use this phrase to clarify their innocence, saying, “I didn’t break the vase, it wasn’t me.”

45. Wasn’t gonna

This phrase is used to express that someone had no intention or plan to do something.

  • For example, “I wasn’t gonna go to the party, but I changed my mind.”
  • In a discussion about a canceled event, someone might say, “The concert wasn’t gonna happen due to low ticket sales.”
  • A person might use this phrase to explain their decision, saying, “I wasn’t gonna take the job offer because it didn’t align with my career goals.”

46. Wasn’t gonna happen

This phrase is used to express that something is not going to happen or occur.

  • For example, if someone suggests a plan that is unrealistic, you might respond, “Sorry, but that wasn’t gonna happen.”
  • In a conversation about a failed event, one might say, “I knew it wasn’t gonna happen from the start.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to express doubt, saying, “I had a feeling it wasn’t gonna happen, and I was right.”

47. Wasn’t gonna work

This phrase is used to indicate that something is not going to work or be successful.

  • For instance, if someone suggests an ineffective solution to a problem, you might say, “Sorry, but that wasn’t gonna work.”
  • In a discussion about a failed plan, one might comment, “We all knew it wasn’t gonna work, but we had to try.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to express skepticism, saying, “I had my doubts from the beginning that it wasn’t gonna work.”

48. Wasn’t gonna make it

This phrase is used to convey that someone or something is not going to succeed or make it.

  • For example, if someone attempts a difficult task without the necessary skills, you might say, “Sorry, but he wasn’t gonna make it.”
  • In a conversation about a failed attempt, one might comment, “I knew she wasn’t gonna make it, but I didn’t want to discourage her.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to express doubt, saying, “I had a feeling I wasn’t gonna make it, and I was right.”

49. Wasn’t gonna make sense

This phrase is used to express that something is not going to make sense or be logical.

  • For instance, if someone presents a confusing argument, you might say, “Sorry, but that wasn’t gonna make sense.”
  • In a discussion about a nonsensical statement, one might comment, “I knew it wasn’t gonna make sense, but I couldn’t find a better explanation.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to express skepticism, saying, “I had my doubts from the beginning that it wasn’t gonna make sense.”

50. wasup

This term is a shortened version of “What’s up?” and is used as a casual greeting or to inquire about someone’s well-being.

  • For example, when meeting a friend, you might say, “Hey, wasup?”
  • In a text message exchange, one person might ask, “wasup with you?”
  • Someone might use this term to start a conversation, saying, “So, wasup with everyone today?”

51. wassup

A greeting or inquiry about how someone is doing. It is a casual way of asking what is happening or what is going on.

  • For example, “Hey, wassup? How’s your day going?”
  • One might say, “Wassup with you? Haven’t seen you in a while.”
  • When meeting up with friends, someone might ask, “Wassup tonight? Any plans?”

52. wassgood

Similar to “wassup,” it is another way of asking what is happening or what is going on. It is often used to inquire about someone’s well-being or to check if anything interesting is happening.

  • For instance, “Hey, wassgood? How’s everything going?”
  • A friend might ask, “Wassgood with you? Anything exciting happening?”
  • When catching up with someone, one might say, “Wassgood lately? Fill me in!”

53. wassabi

A variation of “wassup” or “what’s up,” used to ask what is happening or how someone is doing.

  • For example, “Hey, wassabi? How’s your day going?”
  • One might ask, “Wassabi with you? Anything new?”
  • When meeting up with friends, someone might inquire, “Wassabi tonight? Any plans?”

54. wassock

A derogatory term used to describe someone who is considered foolish or stupid.

  • For instance, “Don’t listen to him, he’s a wassock.”
  • One might say, “Stop acting like a wassock, you’re embarrassing yourself.”
  • When frustrated with someone’s behavior, one might exclaim, “What a wassock!”

55. wassocky

An adjective used to describe someone or something that resembles or exhibits the qualities of a wassock, meaning foolish or stupid.

  • For example, “His wassocky behavior is getting on my nerves.”
  • One might say, “I can’t stand her wassocky attitude.”
  • When describing a situation, one might comment, “It was a wassocky move on his part.”
See also  Top 59 Slang For Mind – Meaning & Usage