Top 63 Slang For White Mexican – Meaning & Usage

White Mexicans, a term used to describe individuals of Mexican descent with fair skin, have their own unique set of slang that combines elements of Mexican and American culture. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang for White Mexicans to help you navigate this vibrant and diverse community. From popular phrases to insider expressions, we’ve got you covered. So, whether you’re a White Mexican yourself or simply interested in expanding your cultural knowledge, get ready to dive into the fascinating world of White Mexican slang!

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1. Gabacho

This term is used to refer to a white person, particularly someone from the United States. It can be considered derogatory or offensive, depending on the context.

  • For example, “Don’t be such a gabacho, learn some Spanish.”
  • In a conversation about cultural differences, someone might say, “As a gabacho, I had to adapt to the Mexican way of life.”
  • A Mexican person might use the term to describe a white tourist, saying, “Look at all the gabachos walking around the market.”

2. Gringo

Similar to “Gabacho,” this term is used to refer to a white person, often from the United States. It can be used playfully or as an insult, depending on the tone and context.

  • For instance, “The gringos are taking over our neighborhood.”
  • In a conversation about traveling, someone might say, “I felt like a gringo when I couldn’t speak the language.”
  • A Mexican person might use the term to describe a group of white tourists, saying, “The gringos seem lost, let’s help them find their way.”

3. Güero

This term is used to describe a white person with blond hair or light-colored features. It can be used affectionately or as a simple descriptive term.

  • For example, “Hey güero, can you pass me the salt?”
  • In a conversation about physical appearance, someone might say, “I envy people with güero hair.”
  • A Mexican person might use the term to describe a friend with light-colored hair, saying, “My güero friend always stands out in a crowd.”

4. Blanquito

This term is a diminutive form of “blanco” (white) and is used to describe a white person in a light-hearted or endearing way.

  • For instance, “Hola, blanquito, how’s it going?”
  • In a conversation about diversity, someone might say, “We need more blanquitos in our group to bring different perspectives.”
  • A Mexican person might use the term to tease a white friend, saying, “Don’t worry, blanquito, you’ll get used to the spicy food.”

5. Paletero

While not specifically slang for a white Mexican, “Paletero” is a term used to describe an ice cream vendor in Mexico. It can be relevant to white Mexicans who may work as paleteros or be associated with the profession.

  • For example, “I bought a popsicle from the paletero on the corner.”
  • In a conversation about street food, someone might say, “The paletero always has the best ice cream.”
  • A Mexican person might mention the paletero as a nostalgic childhood memory, saying, “I used to chase after the paletero’s cart every summer.”

6. Lechero

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican person. It is derived from the word “leche,” meaning milk, and is used to describe someone with fair skin.

  • For example, “He’s a lechero because he has light skin and blue eyes.”
  • In a conversation about racial identity, someone might say, “Being a lechero in Mexico comes with certain privileges.”
  • Another might comment, “Some people use the term lechero as a derogatory way to describe white Mexicans.”

7. Blanco

This is a straightforward term that means “white” in Spanish. It is commonly used to describe a white Mexican person.

  • For instance, “He’s blanco because both of his parents are of European descent.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, someone might say, “Mexico is a diverse country, with people of all skin tones, including blancos.”
  • Another might mention, “Some white Mexicans face discrimination for being blanco in a predominantly mestizo society.”

8. Pelón

While “pelón” literally means “bald” in Spanish, it is also used as a slang term to refer to a white Mexican person. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For example, “He’s a pelón because he has fair skin and light hair.”
  • In a conversation about cultural identity, someone might say, “Being called pelón can be endearing or offensive, depending on the context.”
  • Another might comment, “Some white Mexicans embrace the term pelón as a way to reclaim their identity.”

9. Gringuito

This term combines the Spanish word “gringo,” meaning a foreigner or non-Hispanic, with the diminutive suffix “-ito” to indicate a small or young version. It is used to describe a white Mexican person, particularly a child or someone of a younger age.

  • For instance, “He’s a gringuito because he’s a white Mexican kid.”
  • In a discussion about cultural assimilation, someone might say, “Gringuito is a term used to highlight the influence of American culture on white Mexicans.”
  • Another might mention, “Some white Mexicans find the term gringuito offensive, as it implies a lack of belonging.”

10. Pelo Chino

While “pelo chino” literally means “curly hair” in Spanish, it is also used as a slang term to refer to a white Mexican person. It is often used to describe someone with fair skin and curly or wavy hair.

  • For example, “He’s a pelo chino because he has light skin and curly hair.”
  • In a conversation about cultural diversity, someone might say, “Pelo chino is a term used to acknowledge the mixed heritage of some white Mexicans.”
  • Another might comment, “Some white Mexicans embrace the term pelo chino as a way to celebrate their unique features.”

11. Gabachito

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican, often in a playful or affectionate way. It is derived from the Spanish word “gabacho,” which is a derogatory term for a foreigner or a person from the United States. “Gabachito” is the diminutive form of “gabacho,” indicating a smaller or younger white Mexican.

  • For example, friends might jokingly call their white Mexican friend “Gabachito” as a nickname.
  • In a conversation about cultural diversity, someone might say, “Even though I’m a gabachito, I embrace my Mexican heritage.”
  • A person might post a picture of themselves on social media with the caption, “Feeling proud to be a gabachito!”

12. Guerito

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican with blond hair. It is derived from the Spanish word “guero,” which means “blond” or “fair-skinned.” “Guerito” is the diminutive form of “guero,” indicating a smaller or younger white Mexican with blond hair.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Look at that guerito over there with the golden locks.”
  • In a conversation about physical appearance, a person might comment, “I envy those gueritos with their naturally blond hair.”
  • A friend might affectionately tease their blond white Mexican friend by saying, “Hey, guerito! Need some sunscreen for that fair skin?”

13. Blanquillo

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican, often in a playful or affectionate way. It is derived from the Spanish word “blanco,” which means “white.” “Blanquillo” is the diminutive form of “blanco,” indicating a smaller or younger white Mexican.

  • For example, friends might playfully call their white Mexican friend “Blanquillo” as a nickname.
  • In a conversation about diversity, someone might say, “Even though I’m a blanquillo, I appreciate and respect other cultures.”
  • A person might post a selfie on social media with the caption, “Embracing my blanquillo roots!”

14. Paleterito

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican, often in a playful or affectionate way. It is derived from the Spanish word “paleta,” which means “popsicle.” “Paleterito” is the diminutive form of “paleta,” indicating a smaller or younger white Mexican.

  • For instance, friends might lovingly call their white Mexican friend “Paleterito” as a nickname.
  • In a conversation about cultural diversity, someone might say, “As a paleterito, I enjoy experiencing different cuisines.”
  • A person might post a picture of themselves enjoying a popsicle on social media with the caption, “Being a paleterito means enjoying the simple pleasures in life!”

15. Lecherito

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican, often in a playful or affectionate way. It is derived from the Spanish word “leche,” which means “milk.” “Lecherito” is the diminutive form of “leche,” indicating a smaller or younger white Mexican.

  • For example, friends might playfully call their white Mexican friend “Lecherito” as a nickname.
  • In a conversation about cultural identity, someone might say, “As a lecherito, I embrace both my Mexican and European heritage.”
  • A person might post a picture of themselves enjoying a glass of milk on social media with the caption, “Feeling proud to be a lecherito!”

16. Blanquita

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican girl. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Hey blanquita, let’s go grab some tacos.”
  • In a conversation about cultural identity, someone might ask, “Do you ever feel like a blanquita in a predominantly Mexican community?”
  • A person might describe their appearance by saying, “I have blonde hair and fair skin, so people often call me blanquita.”

17. Gabachita

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican person, particularly a girl. It can carry both positive and negative connotations, depending on the context.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m proud to be a gabachita and embrace my Mexican heritage.”
  • In a discussion about cultural stereotypes, someone might say, “People often assume gabachitas don’t speak Spanish.”
  • A person might use the term self-deprecatingly and say, “As a gabachita, I’m always the palest one on the beach.”

18. Güerita

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican girl with blonde hair. It is a diminutive form of “güera,” which means “blonde” in Spanish.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Hey güerita, you should try this salsa.”
  • In a conversation about physical appearance, someone might say, “I dye my hair blonde, so people call me güerita.”
  • A person might use the term affectionately and say, “My güerita always stands out in a crowd.”

19. Peloncito

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican person who is bald or has very short hair. It is often used in a lighthearted or teasing manner.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Hey peloncito, need some sunscreen for that shiny head?”
  • In a discussion about hairstyles, someone might say, “I’m embracing my peloncito look and rocking the bald style.”
  • A person might use the term self-deprecatingly and say, “I used to have a full head of hair, but now I’m just a peloncito.”

20. Gringuita

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican girl who is perceived as having American or foreign characteristics. It can carry both positive and negative connotations, depending on the context.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m proud to be a gringuita and embrace my multicultural background.”
  • In a discussion about cultural identity, someone might ask, “Do you ever feel like a gringuita in a predominantly Mexican community?”
  • A person might use the term affectionately and say, “My gringuita friend always brings a different perspective to our conversations.”

21. Pelo Chinito

This term refers to someone with curly or wavy hair, often used to describe a person of Mexican descent with white features. The term “pelo chinito” translates to “Chinese hair” in English, but it is used to describe a specific type of hair texture rather than an actual ethnic background.

  • For example, a person might say, “Her pelo chinito is so beautiful. I wish I had curly hair like hers.”
  • In a conversation about different hair types, someone might ask, “Do you prefer straight hair or pelo chinito?”
  • A hairstylist might say, “I specialize in cutting and styling pelo chinito.”

22. Guero/Güero

This term is used to refer to someone who is blonde or has light-colored hair. It can also be used to describe a person with fair or light skin. “Guero” is the masculine form, while “güero” is the feminine form.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s a guero, so he’s more prone to sunburn.”
  • In a conversation about physical appearances, someone might comment, “I wish I had güera hair like yours.”
  • A person might proudly say, “I embrace my guero heritage.”

23. Leche

In the context of slang for White Mexican, “leche” is used to refer to someone who is white or has light skin. It is derived from the Spanish word for milk, which is associated with the color white.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s a leche, so he burns easily in the sun.”
  • In a discussion about racial diversity, someone might comment, “We need to celebrate all skin tones, whether it’s leche or morena.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’m so pale, I practically glow in the dark. Call me leche.”

24. Pollo

In the context of slang for White Mexican, “pollo” is used to describe someone who is white or has light skin. It is derived from the Spanish word for chicken, which is associated with the color white.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s such a pollo, he needs sunscreen even on a cloudy day.”
  • In a conversation about cultural diversity, someone might comment, “It’s important to appreciate different shades of skin, whether it’s pollo or moreno.”
  • A person might playfully say, “I may be a pollo, but I’ve got some spicy flavor.”

25. Guerito/Güerito

This term is a diminutive form of “guero” or “güero” and is used to describe someone who is small in stature and has blonde or light-colored hair. It can also be used to refer to a person with fair or light skin.

  • For example, someone might say, “Look at that güerito over there. He’s so cute.”
  • In a conversation about physical attributes, someone might comment, “I wish I had güerito hair like yours.”
  • A person might affectionately say, “Come here, güerito. Let me give you a hug.”

26. Pollo blanco

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican person. It is often used in a light-hearted or playful manner.

  • For example, friends might jokingly say, “Hey, pollo blanco, want some salsa with your tacos?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I went to a Mexican restaurant and the pollo blanco waiter recommended the best dish.”
  • A person might describe someone as “a pollo blanco with blonde hair and blue eyes.”
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27. Gabachillo

This term is a combination of “gabacho,” a slang term for a white person, and the diminutive suffix “-illo.” It is used to refer to a white Mexican person, often in a friendly or teasing manner.

  • For instance, friends might playfully say, “Hey, gabachillo, you need some sunscreen at the beach.”
  • In a conversation about cultural diversity, someone might say, “I’m a gabachillo, but I love Mexican traditions.”
  • A person might describe a child as “a cute little gabachillo with fair skin.”

28. Gringuito/a

This term is a combination of “gringo,” a slang term for a foreigner, and the diminutive suffix “-ito” or “-ita.” It is used to refer to a white Mexican person, often in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For example, friends might jokingly say, “Hey, gringuito, do you know how to make guacamole?”
  • In a discussion about cultural identity, someone might say, “I’m a gringuito, but I feel connected to Mexican culture.”
  • A person might describe someone as “a gringuita with a love for Mexican food.”

29. Pelón blanco

This term combines “pelón,” which means bald, and “blanco,” which means white. It is used to refer to a white Mexican person, often in a lighthearted or familiar way.

  • For instance, friends might playfully say, “Hey, pelón blanco, don’t forget your sunscreen.”
  • In a conversation about physical appearance, someone might say, “I’m a pelón blanco, but I embrace my unique look.”
  • A person might describe someone as “a pelón blanco with a great sense of humor.”

30. Blanquillo/a

This term is a combination of “blanco,” which means white, and the diminutive suffix “-illo” or “-illa.” It is used to refer to a white Mexican person, often in a friendly or endearing manner.

  • For example, friends might affectionately say, “Hey, blanquillo, let’s go grab some tacos.”
  • In a conversation about cultural diversity, someone might say, “I’m a blanquilla, but I appreciate Mexican traditions.”
  • A person might describe someone as “a blanquillo with a contagious smile.”

31. Guerito/a

This term is used to refer to a person of Mexican descent who has light or fair skin. It can be used both as a noun and an adjective.

  • For example, “Mi amigo es guerito” means “My friend is light-skinned.”
  • In a conversation about physical appearances, someone might say, “Ella es guerita y tiene ojos azules” which translates to “She is light-skinned and has blue eyes.”
  • When describing someone, you might hear, “Es un chico guero con cabello rubio” meaning “He is a light-skinned guy with blond hair.”

32. Lechero/a

This term is used to describe a person, usually a man, who is white or light-skinned. It is a slang term that originated from the stereotype of milkmen being white.

  • For instance, “El lechero es guero” translates to “The milkman is white.”
  • In a conversation about different ethnicities, someone might say, “Los lecheros suelen ser gueros” which means “Milkmen are usually white.”
  • When referring to someone, you might hear, “Mi vecino es lechero” which translates to “My neighbor is white.”

33. Pollo güero

This term is used to describe a person, usually a man, who is white or light-skinned with blond hair. It is a slang term that combines the words “pollo” (chicken) and “güero” (blonde).

  • For example, “Ese pollo güero es mi amigo” means “That blonde chicken is my friend.”
  • In a conversation about physical appearances, someone might say, “Me gustan los hombres pollos güeros” which translates to “I like men who are blonde chickens.”
  • When describing someone, you might hear, “Es un pollo güero muy atractivo” meaning “He is a very attractive blonde chicken.”

34. Gabachín

This term is used to refer to a white or light-skinned person, often with a derogatory connotation. It is a slang term that originated from the word “gabacho,” which is a derogatory term for a foreigner or a person of European descent.

  • For instance, “Ese gabachín no entiende nuestras costumbres” translates to “That whitey doesn’t understand our customs.”
  • In a conversation about different ethnicities, someone might say, “Los gabachines siempre piensan que son superiores” which means “White people always think they are superior.”
  • When referring to someone, you might hear, “No me gusta ese gabachín” which translates to “I don’t like that whitey.”

35. Gringote

This term is used to refer to a white or light-skinned person, often with a derogatory connotation. It is a slang term that originated from the word “gringo,” which is a term used to refer to a foreigner or a person of non-Hispanic descent.

  • For example, “No quiero hablar con ese gringote” means “I don’t want to talk to that whitie.”
  • In a conversation about different ethnicities, someone might say, “Los gringotes siempre creen que pueden imponer su cultura” which means “Whities always think they can impose their culture.”
  • When referring to someone, you might hear, “Ese gringote no tiene respeto por nuestras tradiciones” which translates to “That whitie has no respect for our traditions.”

36. Pelón güero

This term is a slang for a white Mexican who is bald or has very little hair. It is often used in a playful or teasing manner.

  • For example, friends might jokingly call their bald white Mexican friend “Pelón güero.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation, someone might say, “Hey, Pelón güero, did you bring your sunscreen?”
  • It can also be used affectionately, with a friend saying, “Pelón güero, you always make us laugh with your jokes.”

37. Blanquillo/a güero/a

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican person. It is derived from the Spanish word “blanco,” which means white.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I saw a group of blanquillos at the beach today.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person might refer to their white Mexican friend as “güero” or “güera.”
  • It can also be used in a descriptive way, like “That blanquillo over there is really tall.”

38. Vaquero blanco

This term refers to a white Mexican person who embraces cowboy culture or fashion. It combines the Spanish word “vaquero,” meaning cowboy, with “blanco,” meaning white.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Look at that vaquero blanco in his cowboy hat and boots.”
  • In a conversation about cultural influences, someone might mention, “Vaquero blanco style has become popular in certain regions of Mexico.”
  • It can also be used to describe someone’s personality, like “He’s a true vaquero blanco, always ready for a rodeo.”

39. Lechito

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican person, often in a lighthearted or affectionate way. It is derived from the Spanish word “leche,” meaning milk.

  • For example, friends might playfully call their white Mexican friend “Lechito.”
  • In a teasing manner, someone might say, “Hey, Lechito, did you bring the milk for our coffee?”
  • It can also be used as a nickname, with a friend saying, “Lechito, you’re always there to brighten our day.”

40. Vaquerito blanco

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican who tries to imitate or adopt the style and culture of American cowboys. It is often used in a playful or teasing manner.

  • For example, “Look at that vaquerito blanco with his cowboy hat and boots.”
  • In a conversation about cultural appropriation, someone might say, “Some vaquerito blancos need to learn about respecting other cultures.”
  • A Mexican person who is into western fashion might proudly say, “I embrace my vaquerito blanco side!”

41. Pelito chino

This term is used to describe a white Mexican with curly or wavy hair. It is often used in a lighthearted or affectionate way.

  • For instance, “Hey, pelito chino, your curls are looking great today!”
  • In a conversation about hair types, someone might say, “I envy those with pelito chino, my hair is so straight.”
  • A person with pelito chino might say, “I love my curly hair, it’s part of my identity as a white Mexican.”

42. Blanquitito

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican in a diminutive or affectionate way. It is often used to highlight their light skin tone.

  • For example, “Hola, blanquitito, how’s your day going?”
  • In a conversation about diversity, someone might say, “We should celebrate the different shades of blanquititos in our society.”
  • A white Mexican might use the term self-referentially and say, “I’m a proud blanquitito!”

43. Guerito chino

This term is used to describe a white Mexican who has light skin and features that resemble those of someone with Asian ancestry. It is often used to highlight the unique combination of physical characteristics.

  • For instance, “That guerito chino has such interesting facial features.”
  • In a conversation about multiculturalism, someone might say, “Guerito chinos are a great example of the diverse genetic makeup of Mexico.”
  • A person with guerito chino features might say, “I embrace my mixed heritage and love being a guerito chino!”

44. Gabachito chino

This term is used to playfully refer to a white Mexican who has both light skin and features that resemble those of someone with Asian ancestry. It combines the terms “gabachito” (a slang term for a white person) and “chino” (Chinese).

  • For example, “Hey, gabachito chino, what’s up?”
  • In a conversation about racial stereotypes, someone might say, “We should avoid using terms like gabachito chino to categorize people.”
  • A white Mexican with gabachito chino features might say, “I’m proud of my unique appearance as a gabachito chino!”

45. Gavacho

This term is used to refer to a white person, particularly someone of European descent. It is often used to describe someone who is not familiar with Mexican culture or customs.

  • For example, “Look at that gavacho trying to speak Spanish.”
  • In a conversation about cultural differences, someone might say, “As a gavacho, I had to learn to adapt to the Mexican way of life.”
  • A Mexican person might jokingly say, “I can always spot a gavacho in a crowd.”

46. Güero/Güera

This word is used to describe a person with light-colored hair, particularly someone with blonde hair. It can be used to refer to someone of any race or ethnicity, but is commonly used for white individuals.

  • For instance, “My güero friend has the lightest hair I’ve ever seen.”
  • In a conversation about physical appearances, someone might say, “I wish I had güero hair like you.”
  • A Mexican person might affectionately call their white partner, “Mi güero” or “Mi güera.”

47. Blanquito/Blanquita

This term is a diminutive form of “blanco” which means white in Spanish. It is used to refer to someone who is white or has fair skin.

  • For example, “Hey blanquito, can you pass me the salt?”
  • In a friendly conversation, someone might say, “You’re such a blanquita, always avoiding the sun.”
  • A Mexican person might use this term to describe a white person they know, “My blanquito friend is always up for trying new foods.”

48. Pelón/Pelona

This word is used to refer to someone who is bald or has little hair. It can be used to describe someone of any race or ethnicity, but is commonly used for white individuals.

  • For instance, “Look at that pelón over there, he should just shave it all off.”
  • In a conversation about hairstyles, someone might say, “I envy people with thick hair, I’m just a pelona.”
  • A Mexican person might jokingly call their white friend, “Hey pelón, put on a hat before you burn.”

49. Polaco/Polaca

This term is used to refer to someone of Polish descent. It can be used to describe someone of any race or ethnicity, but is commonly used for white individuals.

  • For example, “My friend’s grandparents are from Poland, so she’s a polaca.”
  • In a conversation about different nationalities, someone might say, “I have a polaco friend who makes the best pierogies.”
  • A Mexican person might ask a white person, “Are you polaco? Your last name sounds Polish.”

50. Guiri

This term is used in Spain to refer to a white person, particularly a tourist or foreigner. It can sometimes carry a negative connotation, implying that the person is ignorant or culturally unaware.

  • For example, a local might say, “Look at all the guiris crowding the beach.”
  • In a conversation about travel experiences, someone might mention, “I felt like a guiri in Barcelona, trying to navigate the city.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do guiris really think that wearing socks with sandals is fashionable?”

51. Gabachito/Gabachita

This term is used in Mexico to refer to a white person, specifically someone from France. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Hola, gabachito! How was your trip to Mexico?”
  • In a conversation about cultural differences, someone might mention, “I love how gabachitos always greet each other with a kiss on the cheek.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do gabachitos really eat snails?”

52. Gringuito/Gringuita

This term is used in Mexico to refer to a white person, particularly someone from the United States. It can be used either neutrally or pejoratively, depending on the context.

  • For example, someone might say, “The gringuita at the market was bargaining for a lower price.”
  • In a discussion about language, a person might note, “Gringuitos often struggle with rolling their r’s in Spanish.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do gringuitos really put ketchup on everything?”

53. Blanquillo/Blanquita

This term is used in Latin America to refer to a white person, often with a light-hearted or friendly tone. It is a diminutive form of “blanco,” meaning white.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Hey, blanquillo, want to join us for lunch?”
  • In a conversation about cultural diversity, someone might mention, “Blanquitos tend to stand out in a crowd in certain countries.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do blanquitos really struggle with spicy food?”

54. Polaquito/Polaquita

This term is used in Mexico to refer to a white person, specifically someone from Poland. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Hola, polaquita! How’s your day going?”
  • In a conversation about international cuisine, someone might mention, “Polaquitos make the best pierogies.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do polaquitos really drink vodka with every meal?”

55. Lechita

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican person, often implying innocence or naivety.

  • For example, “Ella es una lechita” means “She is a little milk.”
  • In a conversation about different ethnicities, someone might say, “Los lechitas son una minoría en México” which translates to “White Mexicans are a minority in Mexico.”
  • Another usage could be, “No se puede confiar en los lechitas” meaning “You can’t trust white Mexicans.”

56. Gabachín/Gabachina

This slang term is used to describe a white Mexican who adopts American or gringo customs or behavior.

  • For instance, “Ella se viste como gabachina” means “She dresses like a gringa.”
  • In a discussion about cultural assimilation, someone might say, “Hay muchos gabachines en esta ciudad” which translates to “There are many gringo-like people in this city.”
  • Another usage could be, “No me gusta su acento gabachín” meaning “I don’t like their gringo-like accent.”

57. Gringazo/Gringaza

This slang term refers to a white Mexican person who is perceived to be overly Americanized or influenced by American culture.

  • For example, “Ese gringazo solo habla inglés” means “That gringo punch only speaks English.”
  • In a conversation about cultural identity, someone might say, “No quiero ser un gringazo” which translates to “I don’t want to be a gringo punch.”
  • Another usage could be, “Ella tiene una mentalidad gringaza” meaning “She has a gringo-like mentality.”

58. Blanquín/Blanquita

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican person, often in a playful or endearing manner.

  • For instance, “Hola, blanquín” means “Hello, little white one.”
  • In a friendly conversation, someone might say, “Eres mi blanquita favorita” which translates to “You’re my favorite little white one.”
  • Another usage could be, “Los blanquines tienen piel clara” meaning “White Mexicans have fair skin.”

59. Polaquín/Polaquita

This slang term is used to refer to a white Mexican person with Polish ancestry.

  • For example, “Ella es polaquita” means “She is a little Polish one.”
  • In a discussion about different ethnic backgrounds, someone might say, “Tengo amigos polaquines” which translates to “I have Polish-Mexican friends.”
  • Another usage could be, “Los polaquines tienen tradiciones interesantes” meaning “Polish-Mexicans have interesting traditions.”

60. Lechón/Lechona

This term is used to refer to a white Mexican person, often with a derogatory connotation. It is a slang term that compares the person to a piglet, implying that they are naive, innocent, or easily manipulated.

  • For example, someone might say, “Look at that lechón over there, always falling for scams.”
  • In a conversation about stereotypes, a person might remark, “People often assume that lechones are privileged and sheltered.”
  • Another person might use the term to tease a friend, saying, “Stop being such a lechón and stand up for yourself.”

61. Gabachote/Gabachota

This slang term is used to describe a white Mexican person who tries to imitate American or gringo culture. It is often used in a derogatory manner, implying that the person is not authentic or is trying too hard to fit in with a different culture.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s such a gabachote, always speaking in English and acting like he’s from the US.”
  • In a discussion about cultural identity, a person might comment, “Some white Mexicans face criticism for being gabachotes, as if they’re abandoning their own culture.”
  • Another person might use the term to mock someone, saying, “Look at that gabachota wearing cowboy boots and a cowboy hat, trying to be American.”

62. Polaquillo/Polaquilla

This slang term is used to refer to a white Mexican person with fair skin, often with a derogatory connotation. It compares the person to a Polish individual, implying that they are foreign or different from the norm in Mexican society.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s a polaquilla, always wearing sunscreen and avoiding the sun.”
  • In a conversation about beauty standards, a person might remark, “In Mexican culture, there’s often a preference for tan skin, so polaquillos might face discrimination.”
  • Another person might use the term to tease a friend, saying, “Don’t be such a polaquillo, embrace your Mexican heritage.”

63. Lechudo/Lechuda

This slang term is used to describe a white Mexican person who is perceived as arrogant or stuck-up. It is often used in a negative context, implying that the person feels superior or acts entitled due to their perceived privilege.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s so lechudo, always acting like he’s better than everyone else.”
  • In a discussion about social dynamics, a person might comment, “Lechudos are often seen as out of touch with the struggles faced by other Mexicans.”
  • Another person might use the term to criticize someone, saying, “Stop being so lechuda and show some humility.”