Top 34 Slang For Hunger – Meaning & Usage

Feeling peckish? Curious about the latest slang terms for hunger that are taking over the foodie scene? Look no further! Our team has scoured the culinary landscape to bring you a mouth-watering list of phrases that perfectly capture the insatiable craving for delicious eats. Get ready to satisfy your appetite for trendy language and stay ahead of the hunger game with our ultimate guide to slang for hunger.

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1. Peckish

This term is used to describe a feeling of slight hunger or the desire for a small snack. It is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner.

  • For example, “I’m feeling a bit peckish. Let’s grab a quick bite.”
  • A person might say, “I had a big breakfast, so I’m just peckish for lunch.”
  • Another might ask, “Anyone else feeling peckish? I could go for some chips.”

2. Snacky

This word is used to describe a strong desire or craving for snacks or finger foods. It implies a specific desire for snack-type foods rather than a full meal.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling so snacky right now. I want some chips and dip.”
  • A person might say, “I always get snacky in the afternoon. I need something to munch on.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t resist when I’m feeling snacky. I’ll eat anything in sight!”

3. Craving

This term is used to describe a strong and intense desire for a specific type of food or a general feeling of hunger. It often implies a longing or yearning for a particular taste or flavor.

  • For example, “I’m craving pizza right now. I need to order one.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been craving chocolate all day. I can’t wait to have some.”
  • Another might confess, “I have these random cravings sometimes. Right now, it’s pickles and ice cream.”

4. Munchies

This word is commonly used to describe a strong and often sudden desire for snacks, especially after smoking marijuana. It refers to the increased appetite or craving for food that can occur as a side effect.

  • For instance, “After smoking, I always get the munchies. I can eat a whole bag of chips.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling the munchies. Let’s raid the pantry.”
  • Another might ask, “Anyone else get the munchies after a long day?”

5. Gutom

This word is a Filipino slang term for hunger. It is commonly used in the Philippines to express a feeling of hunger or to indicate that one is in need of food.

  • For example, “I’m so gutom right now. Let’s find a place to eat.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t concentrate on work when I’m gutom. I need to grab a snack.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Gutom na gutom na ako! Saan tayo kakain?” (Translation: “I’m so hungry! Where are we going to eat?”)

6. Belly’s rumbling

When your belly starts to make loud growling or rumbling noises, it’s a sign that you are hungry and need to eat.

  • For instance, “I haven’t eaten all day and now my belly’s rumbling.”
  • If someone asks why you’re grabbing a snack, you can reply, “My belly’s rumbling, I need to eat something.”
  • A friend might say, “I can hear your belly rumbling from here, let’s go grab some food.”

7. Got the munchies

When you have the munchies, it means you have a strong desire to eat, especially snack foods.

  • For example, “After smoking that joint, I’ve got the munchies.”
  • If someone sees you eating a lot, they might ask, “Do you have the munchies?”
  • A friend might say, “I always get the munchies when I’m watching a movie.”

8. Time to feed the beast

This phrase is used to indicate that it’s time to satisfy your hunger by eating.

  • For instance, “I’m starving, time to feed the beast.”
  • If someone asks why you’re heading to the kitchen, you can reply, “It’s time to feed the beast.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t concentrate on work anymore, time to feed the beast.”

9. Ravenous

When you’re ravenous, it means you are extremely hungry and have a strong need to eat.

  • For example, “I skipped breakfast and now I’m ravenous.”
  • If someone asks why you’re eating so quickly, you can reply, “I’m ravenous, I haven’t eaten all day.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t wait for dinner, I’m absolutely ravenous.”

10. Pangs

Pangs are sharp or sudden feelings of hunger that can be felt in the stomach or abdomen.

  • For instance, “I felt hunger pangs after seeing that delicious meal.”
  • If someone asks why you’re grabbing a snack, you can reply, “I’m feeling hunger pangs.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t concentrate on work, I’m having hunger pangs.”

11. Grumble

When your stomach makes a low, growling sound due to hunger. It is often used to describe the physical sensation of hunger.

  • For example, “My grumble is so loud, I think everyone in the room can hear it.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t eaten all day, and my grumble is getting louder.”
  • Another might joke, “I can’t concentrate on anything with this grumble going on in my stomach.”

12. Gotta feed the beast

This phrase is used to express a strong feeling of hunger. It implies that the person’s hunger is intense and needs to be satisfied.

  • For instance, “I’ve been working all day, and now I gotta feed the beast.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t eaten in hours, and I’m starting to feel like I gotta feed the beast.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I just finished a workout, and now I really gotta feed the beast!”

13. Need a bite

This phrase is a casual way of saying that you are feeling hungry and need to eat something. It implies a mild or moderate level of hunger.

  • For example, “I’ve been running errands all day, and now I need a bite.”
  • A person might say, “I skipped breakfast this morning, and now I really need a bite.”
  • Another might suggest, “Let’s grab a quick bite to eat. I’m starting to need a bite.”

14. Could eat a scabby horse

This phrase is used to express a very high level of hunger. It implies that the person is so hungry that they would eat anything, even something unappetizing or undesirable.

  • For instance, “I haven’t eaten all day. I’m so hungry, I could eat a scabby horse.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been hiking all day, and I could eat a scabby horse right now.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’ve been on a diet for weeks. I could eat a scabby horse!”

15. Got the hunger on

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is hungry. It implies a general feeling of hunger.

  • For example, “I skipped lunch, and now I’ve got the hunger on.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t concentrate on work. I’ve got the hunger on.”
  • Another might mention, “I’ve been smelling delicious food all day, and now I’ve got the hunger on.”

16. Need some grub

This phrase is used to express a desire or need for food. “Grub” is a slang term for food.

  • For example, if someone is feeling hungry, they might say, “I need some grub, I haven’t eaten all day.”
  • In a casual conversation about lunch plans, someone might ask, “Anyone up for some grub?”
  • A person sharing a picture of a delicious meal might caption it, “Just enjoying some delicious grub.”

17. Hankering for a bite

When someone has a “hankering for a bite,” they have a strong desire or craving for food.

  • For instance, if someone is in the mood for a snack, they might say, “I have a hankering for a bite of chocolate.”
  • In a discussion about favorite foods, someone might say, “I always have a hankering for a bite of pizza.”
  • A person might post on social media, “Feeling a hankering for a bite of something sweet. Any recommendations?”

18. Got the nibbles

When someone has “the nibbles,” they are feeling slightly hungry and could use a small snack or bite to eat.

  • For example, if someone is feeling a bit hungry before dinner, they might say, “I’ve got the nibbles, I’ll have a small snack.”
  • In a conversation about food cravings, someone might say, “I always get the nibbles for something salty.”
  • A person might post a picture of a plate of appetizers with the caption, “Perfect for when you’ve got the nibbles.”

19. Could eat a horse and chase the jockey

This phrase is used to convey a feeling of extreme hunger. It suggests that someone is so hungry they could eat a large amount of food, including the horse and the jockey riding it.

  • For instance, if someone hasn’t eaten all day and is very hungry, they might say, “I could eat a horse and chase the jockey.”
  • In a conversation about being famished, someone might jokingly exclaim, “I’m so hungry, I could eat a horse and chase the jockey!”
  • A person might post a picture of a huge meal with the caption, “When you’re so hungry you could eat a horse and chase the jockey.”

20. Need some chow

This phrase is used to express a need or desire for food. “Chow” is a slang term for food.

  • For example, if someone is feeling hungry and needs to eat, they might say, “I need some chow, I haven’t eaten all day.”
  • In a conversation about dinner plans, someone might ask, “Anyone up for some chow?”
  • A person might post a picture of a delicious meal with the caption, “Just enjoying some tasty chow.”

21. Got the hungries

This phrase is used to express a strong feeling of hunger.

  • For example, “I haven’t eaten all day, I’ve got the hungries.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t have time for breakfast this morning, so now I’ve got the hungries.”
  • Someone might jokingly say, “I smell pizza and now I’ve got the hungries.”

22. Could eat the hind leg off a donkey

This phrase is used to emphasize a person’s extreme hunger.

  • For instance, “I’m so hungry, I could eat the hind leg off a donkey.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t eaten all day and I could eat the hind leg off a donkey right now.”
  • Someone might jokingly say, “I’m starving! I could eat the hind leg off a donkey and still be hungry.”

23. Need some vittles

This phrase is used to express a need or desire for food.

  • For example, “I’ve been working all day and I need some vittles.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling weak, I need some vittles.”
  • Someone might jokingly say, “I’m starving, I need some vittles or I might pass out.”

24. Got the belly rumbles

This phrase is used to describe the sound and feeling of a hungry stomach.

  • For instance, “I haven’t eaten in hours and now I’ve got the belly rumbles.”
  • A person might say, “My stomach won’t stop growling, I’ve got the belly rumbles.”
  • Someone might jokingly say, “I can’t concentrate on anything because my belly rumbles are so loud.”

25. Could eat a scabby dog

This phrase is used to emphasize a person’s extreme hunger.

  • For example, “I’m so hungry, I could eat a scabby dog.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t eaten all day and I could eat a scabby dog right now.”
  • Someone might jokingly say, “I’m starving! I could eat a scabby dog and still be hungry.”

26. Need some nosh

This phrase is commonly used in British slang to express a desire for food. “Nosh” refers to a meal or snack.

  • For example, “I’m feeling hungry, I need some nosh.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s find a good place to grab some nosh.”
  • When discussing different cuisines, one might ask, “Where can I get some delicious nosh?”

27. Got the tummy rumbles

This phrase is used to describe the rumbling sounds that occur in the stomach when a person is hungry.

  • For instance, “I haven’t eaten all day, and my tummy rumbles are driving me crazy.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t concentrate on work because my tummy rumbles won’t stop.”
  • When discussing hunger with a friend, one might ask, “Do you ever get those intense tummy rumbles?”

28. Need some chow down

This phrase is used to express a desire to eat a meal or consume food.

  • For example, “I’m starving, let’s chow down on some pizza.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t eaten all day, I really need to chow down.”
  • When discussing dinner plans, one might suggest, “Let’s find a good restaurant and chow down on some delicious food.”

29. Could eat a horse and chase the rider

This phrase is used to emphasize extreme hunger. It suggests that the person is so hungry, they could eat a large amount of food, even to the point of chasing down the source of the food.

  • For instance, “I’m so hungry, I could eat a horse and chase the rider.”
  • Someone might say, “After a long day of hiking, I could eat a horse and chase the rider.”
  • When discussing their appetite, one might exclaim, “I haven’t eaten all day, I could seriously eat a horse and chase the rider right now!”

30. Need some chow time

This phrase is used to express that it is time to eat or that one is ready to eat.

  • For example, “I’m hungry, it’s chow time.”
  • A person might say, “After a long day at work, it’s finally chow time.”
  • When discussing lunch plans, one might say, “It’s chow time, let’s go grab some food.”

31. Got the belly growls

This phrase is used to describe the sensation of hunger when your stomach starts to make growling noises. It signifies that you are in need of food.

  • For example, “I haven’t eaten all day and now I’ve got the belly growls.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you hungry? You’ve got the belly growls.”
  • When feeling hungry during a meeting, you might whisper to a colleague, “I’ve got the belly growls. Let’s grab some lunch after this.”

32. Need some chow down time

This phrase is used to express the need or desire to eat. It implies that it’s time to sit down and enjoy a meal.

  • For instance, “After a long day at work, I need some chow down time.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been craving pizza all day. I need some chow down time.”
  • When discussing lunch plans with a colleague, you might suggest, “Let’s find a nice restaurant for some chow down time.”

33. Got the tummy growls

Similar to “belly growls,” this phrase is used to describe the sensation of hunger when your stomach starts to make growling noises. It indicates that you are in need of food.

  • For example, “I skipped breakfast and now I’ve got the tummy growls.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s that noise? Do you have the tummy growls?”
  • When feeling hungry during a road trip, you might say, “I’ve got the tummy growls. Let’s find a place to eat.”

34. Rumbly in the tumbly

This phrase is a playful way to describe feeling hungry. It suggests that your stomach is making rumbling noises and you are in need of food.

  • For instance, “I haven’t had dinner yet and now I’m rumbly in the tumbly.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t concentrate on work. My tummy is rumbly in the tumbly.”
  • When discussing dinner plans with a friend, you might say, “Let’s go out to eat. I’m rumbly in the tumbly.”
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