Top 61 Slang For Tracking – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying in the loop and keeping tabs on the latest trends, having the right lingo is key. Tracking slang is all about staying ahead of the game and knowing the ins and outs of what’s hot. Our team has done the legwork to bring you a rundown of the most current and buzzworthy tracking terms out there. Stay tuned and get ready to level up your slang game with this essential list!

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1. Tailing

Tailing refers to the act of following someone closely, usually to monitor their movements or gather information. It is often used in surveillance or investigative contexts.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We’ve been tailing the suspect for days, trying to gather evidence.”
  • In a spy movie, a character might say, “I’ll tail the target and report back to headquarters.”
  • A journalist investigating a story might say, “I’ve been tailing this politician to see if they’re involved in any scandals.”

2. Shadowing

Shadowing involves closely monitoring someone’s activities or movements, often without their knowledge. It is a term commonly used in surveillance or intelligence operations.

  • For instance, a private investigator might say, “I’ve been shadowing the subject for weeks, trying to gather evidence of their activities.”
  • In a spy novel, a character might say, “I’ll shadow the target and report back to my handler.”
  • A security agent might say, “We suspect someone is shadowing our client, so we need to increase our protective measures.”

3. Trailing

Trailing refers to discreetly following someone to gather information or monitor their activities. It is often used in investigative or surveillance contexts.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I’ve been trailing this celebrity to get exclusive photos and interviews.”
  • In a mystery novel, a detective might say, “I’ll trail the suspect and see where they lead us.”
  • A suspicious spouse might say, “I’ve been trailing my partner to see if they’re cheating on me.”

4. Stalking

Stalking involves obsessively following and monitoring someone’s activities or personal life, often with malicious intent or to instill fear. It is a serious behavior that can have legal consequences.

  • For instance, a victim might say, “I’m being stalked by someone who keeps showing up at my workplace.”
  • In a crime documentary, a detective might say, “The suspect has a history of stalking his victims before attacking them.”
  • A concerned friend might say, “I think someone is stalking our mutual friend on social media.”

5. Tagging

Tagging refers to marking or tracking someone’s location or movements, often using technology such as GPS. It can be used for various purposes, such as keeping track of a person’s whereabouts or providing updates to others.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I use a GPS tracker to tag my child’s location for safety.”
  • In a travel blog, a writer might say, “I’ve been tagging my journey on a map to share with my followers.”
  • A hiker might say, “I’ll tag our meeting point so we don’t get lost in the wilderness.”

6. Tailgating

Tailgating refers to driving too closely behind another vehicle. It often involves staying within a few feet of the car in front, which can be dangerous and increase the risk of a rear-end collision.

  • For example, “The driver behind me was tailgating so closely that I couldn’t see their headlights.”
  • A frustrated driver might say, “I can’t stand it when people tailgate me on the highway.”
  • A defensive driver might advise, “If someone is tailgating you, it’s best to slow down and let them pass.”

7. Hounding

Hounding refers to persistently following or pursuing someone or something. It can involve relentless pursuit or constant attention, often with the intention of getting information or achieving a goal.

  • For instance, “The paparazzi were hounding the celebrity as she left the restaurant.”
  • A journalist might say, “I’ve been hounding the company for a statement, but they’re not responding.”
  • Someone might complain, “My boss is constantly hounding me for updates on the project.”

8. Pursuing

Pursuing refers to actively chasing after someone or something. It can involve seeking or trying to attain a goal, whether it’s a person, an object, or an achievement.

  • For example, “He’s pursuing a career in acting.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team is aggressively pursuing a championship title.”
  • A person might say, “I’m pursuing my dreams and not letting anything hold me back.”

9. Tracking down

Tracking down refers to the act of finding or locating someone or something. It often involves following clues or conducting investigations to locate a person, object, or information.

  • For instance, “The detective is tracking down the suspect.”
  • A person might say, “I need to track down that book I lent to my friend.”
  • A researcher might say, “I’ve been tracking down primary sources for my thesis.”

10. Tailing off

Tailing off refers to gradually decreasing or diminishing. It can describe a decline in quantity, quality, or intensity over time.

  • For example, “The conversation started off lively but then gradually tailed off.”
  • A person might say, “My motivation for the project has been tailing off lately.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team’s performance has been tailing off in the second half of the season.”

11. Stalking horse

This term refers to a person or thing used to conceal someone’s true intentions or to distract attention from their actual goal. It is commonly used in the context of politics or negotiations.

  • For example, a politician might use a controversial issue as a stalking horse to push their own agenda.
  • In a business negotiation, one party might propose a less important issue as a stalking horse to divert attention from their main demands.
  • A journalist might describe a public figure’s statement as a stalking horse for a larger policy change.

12. Dogging

This slang term is used to describe the act of closely following or pursuing someone or something. It often implies a sense of persistence or determination in the pursuit.

  • For instance, a detective might engage in dogging a suspect to gather evidence.
  • In a spy novel, the protagonist might be dogging a dangerous enemy.
  • A journalist might describe a paparazzi’s behavior as dogging a celebrity.

13. Tracing

Tracing refers to the process of following the movements, actions, or history of a person or object in order to gather information or uncover details. It is commonly used in the context of investigations or research.

  • For example, a detective might be tracing a suspect’s whereabouts on the night of a crime.
  • In genealogy, individuals often trace their family history to uncover their ancestry.
  • A journalist might trace the origin of a viral video to determine its authenticity.

14. Tailing back

Tailing back is a slang term used to describe the act of closely following someone or something, typically while maintaining a discreet or inconspicuous distance.

  • For instance, a private investigator might tail back a subject to gather evidence of their activities.
  • In a spy movie, the protagonist might tail back an enemy agent to gather intelligence.
  • A journalist might tail back a political candidate during a campaign trail to report on their activities.

15. Tracking forward

Tracking forward refers to the act of persistently pursuing or following someone or something with the intention of maintaining contact or keeping up with their movements.

  • For example, a wildlife biologist might track forward a tagged animal to study its behavior and habitat.
  • In a search and rescue operation, teams might track forward a lost hiker to locate their position.
  • A journalist might track forward a breaking news story to provide real-time updates.

16. Shadowing behind

This phrase refers to the act of closely following someone or something, usually without their knowledge or consent. It implies a sense of secrecy or stealth in the tracking process.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I’ve been shadowing behind the suspect for days, gathering evidence.”
  • In a spy novel, a character might describe their actions by saying, “I’ve been shadowing behind the enemy agent, trying to uncover their secrets.”
  • A person discussing their ex-partner’s behavior might say, “I suspect they’ve been shadowing behind me, watching my every move.”

17. Stalking ahead

This phrase refers to the act of actively pursuing or following someone or something, often with the intention of observing or monitoring their actions. It implies a more direct and intentional form of tracking.

  • For instance, a wildlife photographer might say, “I spent hours stalking ahead to capture the perfect shot of the elusive animal.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might describe their actions by saying, “We were stalking ahead to gather intelligence on the enemy.”
  • A person discussing their crush’s social media activity might say, “I couldn’t help but stalk ahead and look through all their posts.”

18. Tagging along

This phrase refers to the act of following someone or something closely, often without any particular purpose or intention. It implies a more casual or incidental form of tracking.

  • For example, a group of friends might say, “We’re just tagging along on the hiking trip, not really sure where we’re going.”
  • In a work setting, a coworker might describe their actions by saying, “I’m just tagging along to the meeting to see what’s going on.”
  • A person discussing a celebrity sighting might say, “I saw them at the mall and decided to tag along for a bit.”

19. Tailing close

This phrase refers to the act of closely following someone or something, usually with the intention of keeping a constant watch or surveillance. It implies a sense of proximity and attention to detail in the tracking process.

  • For instance, a private investigator might say, “I’ve been tailing close behind the subject, documenting their every move.”
  • In a spy thriller, a character might describe their actions by saying, “I’ve been tailing close to the target, waiting for the right moment to strike.”
  • A person discussing their suspicious neighbor might say, “I’ve noticed them tailing close behind me whenever I leave the house.”

20. Tracking steps

This phrase refers to the act of carefully observing and recording someone’s movements or actions. It implies a systematic and methodical approach to tracking.

  • For example, a fitness enthusiast might say, “I’ve been tracking my steps using a fitness app to monitor my daily activity.”
  • In a criminal investigation, a detective might describe their actions by saying, “We’re tracking the suspect’s steps to establish their whereabouts.”
  • A person discussing their travel experiences might say, “I love tracking my steps on a map to see how far I’ve explored.”

21. Tail

To “tail” someone means to secretly follow them, typically without their knowledge or consent. This term is often used in the context of surveillance or tracking someone’s movements.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to tail the suspect and see where they go.”
  • In a spy movie, a character might say, “I’ll tail the target and report back to headquarters.”
  • A person discussing stalking might say, “It’s important to recognize the signs if someone is trying to tail you.”

22. Shadow

To “shadow” someone means to closely and discreetly follow them, often with the intention of observing their actions or gathering information. This term is commonly used in the context of surveillance or espionage.

  • For instance, a private investigator might say, “I’ll shadow the subject and see if they lead us to any new clues.”
  • In a thriller novel, a character might say, “The assassin shadowed the target, waiting for the perfect moment to strike.”
  • A journalist investigating a story might say, “I’ll shadow the politician and see if they’re meeting with any suspicious individuals.”

23. Stalk

To “stalk” someone means to obsessively monitor their activities, often with the intention of causing harm or instilling fear. This term is most commonly associated with unwanted and intrusive behavior.

  • For example, a victim of stalking might say, “I’m afraid to leave my house because my ex continues to stalk me.”
  • In a news report, a journalist might say, “The celebrity has filed a restraining order against a fan who has been stalking them.”
  • A person discussing online harassment might say, “It’s important to report and block individuals who stalk and harass others on social media.”

24. Trail

To “trail” someone means to follow their path or track their movements. This term is often used in the context of outdoor activities or tracking the whereabouts of a person or animal.

  • For instance, a hiker might say, “Let’s trail behind the group and enjoy the peacefulness of the hike.”
  • In a nature documentary, a narrator might say, “The predator trails its prey, waiting for the perfect moment to strike.”
  • A detective investigating a missing person case might say, “We need to trail the individual’s last known movements and see if we can find any leads.”

25. Hunt

To “hunt” someone or something means to actively search for them or it. This term is often used in the context of tracking down a target or searching for a specific object.

  • For example, a bounty hunter might say, “I’m going to hunt down the fugitive and bring them to justice.”
  • In a treasure hunt, a participant might say, “Let’s split up and hunt for clues to find the hidden treasure.”
  • A person discussing animal conservation might say, “It’s important to protect endangered species from being hunted to extinction.”

26. Tag

This term refers to the act of labeling or marking something or someone for the purpose of tracking or identification. In the context of tracking, it can also refer to attaching a tracking device to an object or person.

  • For example, in a game of tag, one person is “it” and must try to tag other players.
  • In a social media post, someone might tag their friends to notify them or include them in the conversation.
  • A wildlife researcher might tag animals with tracking collars to study their movements and behavior.
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27. Trace

To trace means to follow or track the path or whereabouts of something or someone. It can also refer to the act of investigating or uncovering information about someone or something.

  • For instance, a detective might trace a criminal’s steps to solve a case.
  • In a conversation about genealogy, someone might trace their family history back several generations.
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to trace the origin of this mysterious phone call.”

28. Monitor

Monitoring involves observing or tracking something or someone closely, usually over a period of time. It can involve using technology or simply keeping a watchful eye.

  • For example, a teacher might monitor students during an exam to prevent cheating.
  • In the context of health, someone might monitor their heart rate using a fitness tracker.
  • A parent might monitor their child’s internet usage to ensure their safety.

29. Pursue

To pursue means to chase or follow something or someone, often with the intention of catching or capturing them. In the context of tracking, it can refer to actively seeking out information or clues about someone or something.

  • For instance, a police officer might pursue a suspect on foot.
  • In a job search, someone might pursue a career in a specific field.
  • A journalist might pursue a lead to uncover a story.

30. Watch

To watch means to keep an eye on something or someone, often for the purpose of observing or monitoring their actions or behavior.

  • For example, a security guard might watch a surveillance camera feed to ensure the safety of a building.
  • In a sports game, fans might watch the players closely to see who will score the winning goal.
  • A concerned friend might watch a loved one’s social media posts for signs of distress.
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31. Hunt down

This phrase is used to describe the act of actively searching for and capturing or finding someone or something. It implies a determined and relentless effort to track down the target.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We will hunt down the criminal and bring them to justice.”
  • In a video game, a character might say, “I will hunt down every enemy and complete the mission.”
  • A person discussing a lost item might say, “I will hunt down my missing keys until I find them.”

32. Keep tabs

This phrase means to keep a close watch or monitor someone or something. It implies keeping track of their actions or whereabouts.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I always keep tabs on my children to ensure their safety.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “I like to keep tabs on my employees’ progress to ensure they are meeting their goals.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll keep tabs on the concert tickets and let you know if any become available.”

33. Monitoring

This term refers to the act of observing and tracking someone or something closely. It often implies a continuous or regular watch over the target.

  • For example, a security guard might say, “I am responsible for monitoring the surveillance cameras.”
  • In a scientific study, a researcher might say, “We are monitoring the behavior of the animals in their natural habitat.”
  • A parent might say, “I am monitoring my child’s online activity to ensure their safety.”

34. Watching

This word is used to describe the act of closely observing and tracking someone or something. It implies a vigilant and attentive watch over the target.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We have been watching the suspect’s movements for weeks.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might say, “Keep watching the opposing team’s star player and don’t let him score.”
  • A person discussing neighborhood safety might say, “We need to watch for any suspicious activity in our community.”

35. Shadowed

This term refers to the act of closely following and tracking someone’s movements. It implies staying in close proximity to the target without being detected.

  • For example, a spy might say, “I shadowed the enemy agent to gather valuable information.”
  • In a thriller novel, a character might say, “The detective realized he was being shadowed by an unknown figure.”
  • A person discussing personal safety might say, “I always make sure no one is shadowing me when I walk alone at night.”

36. Hunted

This term refers to someone who is actively being sought after or pursued. It can imply a sense of danger or being pursued by an enemy or authority figure.

  • For example, in a spy thriller, the protagonist might say, “I am being hunted by the enemy agents.”
  • In a survival game, a player might exclaim, “I’m being hunted by a pack of wolves!”
  • A fugitive on the run might say, “I can’t stay in one place for too long, I’m being hunted by the police.”

37. Tracked

This term refers to the act of following someone’s movements or activities, usually with the intent of keeping tabs on them or gathering information.

  • For instance, a private investigator might say, “I tracked the suspect’s movements for days before catching him.”
  • In a technology-related context, a person might say, “My online activities are constantly being tracked by advertisers.”
  • A concerned parent might ask their child, “Are you aware that your phone’s location is being tracked?”

38. Monitored

This term refers to the act of observing or recording someone’s actions, conversations, or behavior for a specific purpose, such as security or control.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I monitored the students during the exam to prevent cheating.”
  • In a workplace setting, an employer might say, “We monitor employee emails and internet usage for security purposes.”
  • A person discussing government surveillance might argue, “Our privacy is being violated when our communications are monitored without consent.”

39. Pursued

This term refers to the act of actively chasing or following someone with the intention of catching or capturing them.

  • For instance, in a high-speed car chase, a police officer might say, “We pursued the suspect for miles before apprehending them.”
  • In a romantic context, a person might say, “I pursued my crush for months before they finally agreed to go on a date.”
  • A person discussing a personal goal might say, “I am pursuing my dream of becoming a professional musician.”

40. Watched

This term refers to the act of being observed or monitored, often with a sense of suspicion or vigilance.

  • For example, a person might say, “I feel like I’m being watched every time I walk down that street.”
  • In a political context, a citizen might say, “We need to hold our elected officials accountable and make sure they know we’re watching.”
  • A person discussing their privacy might say, “I value my alone time and don’t like feeling constantly watched.”

41. Tailed

When someone is “tailed,” it means they are being closely followed and monitored, usually without their knowledge. This term is often used in the context of surveillance or covert operations.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We tailed the suspect for days before making an arrest.”
  • In a spy novel, a character might say, “I can’t shake the feeling that I’m being tailed.”
  • A person discussing privacy concerns might say, “We need to be aware of how our digital activities are being tailed by companies and governments.”

42. Tagged

To be “tagged” means to be identified or labeled, often in a negative or undesirable way. This term is commonly used in the context of online tracking or social media.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I got tagged in an embarrassing photo on Facebook.”
  • In a discussion about online harassment, someone might say, “People need to think before they tag others in hurtful posts.”
  • A person discussing privacy might say, “We should be cautious about what personal information we allow to be tagged on social media.”

43. Traced

When something or someone is “traced,” it means their movements or location have been determined and followed. This term is often used in the context of investigations or locating individuals.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We traced the suspect’s phone to a warehouse on the outskirts of town.”
  • In a mystery novel, a character might say, “The detective traced the stolen artifact to a hidden vault.”
  • A person discussing cybersecurity might say, “It’s important to use encrypted connections to prevent your online activities from being traced.”

44. Hunted down

To be “hunted down” means to be actively pursued with the intention of capturing or harming. This term is often used in the context of fugitives or dangerous individuals.

  • For instance, a news headline might read, “Fugitive finally hunted down after months on the run.”
  • In a thriller movie, a character might say, “They won’t stop until they’ve hunted us all down.”
  • A person discussing justice might say, “Criminals should be held accountable and hunted down by law enforcement.”

45. Tracking system

A “tracking system” refers to a mechanism or technology used to monitor and record the movement or location of something or someone. This term is commonly used in the context of logistics, transportation, or surveillance.

  • For example, a company might say, “Our tracking system allows us to efficiently manage our inventory.”
  • In a discussion about wildlife conservation, someone might say, “Satellite tracking systems help scientists study the migration patterns of animals.”
  • A person discussing privacy might say, “We should be cautious about companies collecting data through tracking systems without our consent.”

46. Surveillance

Surveillance refers to the act of monitoring or observing someone or something, usually in secret or without their knowledge. It can involve the use of cameras, listening devices, or other methods of gathering information.

  • For example, “The police used surveillance footage to identify the suspect.”
  • In a discussion about privacy, someone might say, “I don’t like the idea of constant surveillance.”
  • A person concerned about security might ask, “Are there any surveillance cameras in this area?”

47. Pursuit

Pursuit is a term used to describe the act of chasing or following someone or something in order to catch or capture them. It can refer to a physical pursuit or a metaphorical one, such as pursuing a goal or a career.

  • For instance, “The police were in hot pursuit of the suspect.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “Running is my favorite form of pursuit.”
  • A person discussing their career might say, “I’m in pursuit of a promotion.”

48. Watchdog

A watchdog is a person or organization that monitors or guards against wrongdoing, particularly in a specific area or industry. They act as a protector or guardian, keeping a close eye on activities and holding others accountable.

  • For example, “The media serves as a watchdog for democracy.”
  • In a discussion about consumer protection, someone might say, “We need more watchdog organizations to ensure fair business practices.”
  • A person concerned about government transparency might ask, “Who will be the watchdog for this new policy?”

49. Tracker

A tracker is a person or device that follows or traces the movements of others. It can refer to someone skilled in tracking animals or people, or to a technology or system that monitors and records location data.

  • For instance, “The tracker led the search party to the missing hiker.”
  • In a conversation about fitness, someone might say, “I use a fitness tracker to monitor my daily steps.”
  • A person discussing technology might ask, “Do you know of any good GPS trackers for cars?”

50. Tracer

A tracer is a device or substance that is used to mark the path or location of something. It can refer to a chemical compound that emits light or color, making it visible in low-light or dark conditions, or to a device that leaves a visible trail or mark.

  • For example, “The tracer rounds allowed the soldiers to see where their bullets were going.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might say, “I use a tracer to help me sketch the outline of my drawings.”
  • A person discussing forensic science might ask, “How do investigators use tracers to track the movement of a suspect?”

51. Snooping

Snooping refers to secretly or discreetly investigating or gathering information about someone without their knowledge or permission. It often implies prying into someone’s personal affairs or invading their privacy.

  • For example, “I caught my roommate snooping through my belongings.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t appreciate you snooping around in my business.”
  • In a conversation about privacy, someone might comment, “The government’s snooping on its citizens is a violation of civil liberties.”

52. Spying

Spying involves secretly observing or monitoring someone or something, often with the intention of gathering information or uncovering secrets. It typically implies a level of secrecy and stealth.

  • For instance, “He suspected his neighbor was spying on him through binoculars.”
  • In a spy thriller, a character might say, “I’ve been sent here to spy on the enemy.”
  • A person discussing privacy might argue, “We need stronger laws to protect against government spying.”

53. Eavesdropping

Eavesdropping refers to secretly listening to a conversation or obtaining information by stealthily overhearing it. It often implies an intrusion into a private conversation or situation.

  • For example, “She couldn’t help eavesdropping on the table next to her at the restaurant.”
  • In a discussion about privacy, someone might say, “We need to be careful about who might be eavesdropping on our conversations.”
  • A person might admit, “I couldn’t resist eavesdropping on my sister’s phone call.”

54. Surveillance state

A surveillance state refers to a society or government that closely monitors its citizens, often through extensive surveillance systems and technologies. It implies a high level of constant observation and control.

  • For instance, “Some people argue that we are living in a surveillance state.”
  • In a discussion about privacy, someone might say, “The rise of technology has led to the creation of a surveillance state.”
  • A person might express concern, “I feel like we’re constantly being watched in this surveillance state.”

55. Keeping tabs

Keeping tabs means to closely monitor or keep track of someone or something, often to stay informed or updated on their activities or whereabouts.

  • For example, “She always keeps tabs on her kids to make sure they’re safe.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “I like to keep tabs on my partner’s social media activity.”
  • A person might admit, “I’ve been keeping tabs on the competition to see what they’re up to.”

56. Eyes on

This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is keeping a close watch on a person or situation.

  • For example, “Keep your eyes on that suspect, we don’t want to lose track of them.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Keep your eyes on the ball at all times.”
  • A supervisor might tell an employee, “I’ll be keeping my eyes on you to make sure you’re following the rules.”

57. Tracing back

This term is used to describe the process of retracing or following the path of someone or something in order to find information or understand their actions.

  • For instance, “We need to trace back the source of this rumor to see where it started.”
  • In a detective story, a character might say, “I traced back the suspect’s movements and discovered they were at the scene of the crime.”
  • A historian might talk about “tracing back” the origins of a particular event or tradition.
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58. Keeping an eye on

This phrase indicates that someone is paying attention to or watching someone or something carefully.

  • For example, “I’ll be keeping an eye on the situation and providing updates.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “I’ll be keeping an eye on you while you play in the park.”
  • A security guard might be instructed to “keep an eye on” a specific area or person.

59. Following the trail

This phrase is often used to describe the act of physically or metaphorically following the path or actions of someone or something in order to gather information or understand their movements.

  • For instance, “The detective followed the trail of clues to solve the mystery.”
  • In a hiking context, someone might say, “We need to follow the trail markers to stay on the right path.”
  • A journalist might talk about “following the trail” of a breaking news story to gather more information.

60. Keeping watch

This phrase means to be alert and attentive, watching for any changes or potential threats.

  • For example, “The security guard is keeping watch over the building to ensure no unauthorized individuals enter.”
  • A lifeguard might be instructed to “keep watch” over the pool to ensure everyone’s safety.
  • A lookout on a ship might be assigned to “keep watch” for any signs of danger.

61. Keeping a close eye

This phrase means to watch or observe something or someone attentively and with great focus. It implies a sense of vigilance and awareness.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I’m keeping a close eye on my child at the playground.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “I’m keeping a close eye on the sales numbers to ensure we meet our targets.”
  • A detective investigating a suspect might say, “We need to keep a close eye on their movements to gather evidence.”